New 'world-first' weight-loss device locks mouth shut, forcing a liquid diet

Health

KOMO News 28 June, 2021 - 03:59pm 60 views

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New weight-loss tool prevents mouth from opening more than 2mm

The Guardian 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

The device, developed by medical professionals from the University of Otago in New Zealand and scientists from Leeds in the UK, can be fitted by dentists and uses magnetic components with locking bolts.

It has been criticised online, however, with people likening it to a medieval torture device.

The University of Otago tweeted that it was “a world-first” weight-loss device “to help fight the global obesity epidemic: an intra-oral device that restricts a person to a liquid diet.”

Called the DentalSlim Diet Control, the device allows its users to open their mouths only 2mm wide. Initially, it was trialled on seven otherwise healthy obese women from Dunedin in New Zealand for two weeks, who were given a low-calorie liquid diet.

But participants complained that the device was hard to use, causing discomfort with their speech. They said they felt tense and that “life in general was less satisfying”.

One participant did not follow the rules and instead consumed foods they were not supposed to, such as chocolate, by melting them.

Prof Paul Brunton from the University of Otago said the main barrier that stopped weight loss was “compliance”. He said that the tool helped to establish new habits that could kickstart the process”.

He said: “It is a non-invasive, reversible, economical and attractive alternative to surgical procedures.”

The DentalSlim Diet Control has received criticism online, with people on Twitter saying: “You don’t need this torture device to go on a liquid diet.”

The University of Otago said: “To clarify, the intention of the device is not intended as a quick or long-term weight-loss tool. Rather, it is aimed to assist people who need to undergo surgery and who cannot have the surgery until they have lost weight.”

The research team behind the product included Dr Jonathan Bodansky of Leeds and Dr Richard Hall of RMH consultancy in Leeds.

DentalSlim weight-loss device literally locks your mouth shut

New Atlas 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

The researchers say this medieval-sounding machine, which is fixed to the first molars with orthodontic cement by a dentist, doesn't restrict breathing or speech, but holds people to a liquid diet.

In a study published in the British Dental Journal, seven healthy, obese participants wore the devices for 14 days. They were given a commercially-available liquid diet to follow, giving them 1,200 kcal of energy per day. The mean weight loss over this period was 6.36 kg (14 lb).

The jaw-lock device appears to have been conceived as a less invasive, less dangerous and more humane way to achieve what doctors were going for in the 1980s when some obese patients had their jaws surgically wired shut – a practice that left people at serious risk of choking if they vomited.

To avoid that possibility, the DentalSlim Diet Control comes with an emergency unlocking tool for users to carry with them at all times. No participant in the study reported having used this key, although one patient admitted to "cheating" by sneaking in some melted chocolate and fizzy drinks.

"It’s hard yards" says Brunton. "Patients who really want to do this have to be committed. But for those people who are really struggling – and let’s face it, that’s millions of people across the world – this is a way of getting them back into normal lifestyle diet habits by really pump priming the process."

The paper is open access in the British Dental Journal.

Source: University of Otago

Weight-loss device uses magnets to clamp your TEETH together

Daily Mail 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

By Jonathan Chadwick For Mailonline

In a jaw-dropping attempt to curb the obesity epidemic, scientists have created a weight-loss device that uses magnets and locking bolts to clamp the teeth together.

DentalSlim Diet Control, created by researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand, is fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth. 

It only lets the wearer open their mouths by about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but without preventing speech or – more importantly – breathing. 

Once fitted, the device aims to stop anyone from gorging on solid foods that may go against their strict diet plan. 

The creators describe it as 'non-invasive' – even though it requires 'custom-manufactured locking bolts' clamped inside the mouth.  

In trials detailed in the British Dental Journal, participants lost an average of one stone (6.36kg) in two weeks and 'were motivated to continue with their weight loss journey', the experts claim. 

This is not a joke: DentalSlim Diet Control has been created as a way to curb obesity - by clamping the mouth shut

Lead researcher, Professor Paul Brunton at the University of Otago, thinks the device will be an effective, safe and affordable tool for people battling obesity. 

DentalSlim Diet Control can be released by the user in the case of an emergency and can be repeatedly fitted and removed. 

'The main barrier for people for successful weight loss is compliance and this helps them establish new habits, allowing them to comply with a low-calorie diet for a period of time. It really kick-starts the process,' Professor Brunton said.  

Being overweight or obese results in about 2.8 million deaths a year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Pictured, a morbidly obese man 

'It is a non-invasive, reversible, economical and attractive alternative to surgical procedures. The fact is, there are no adverse consequences with this device.'

The tool could be helpful for those having to lose weight to undergo surgery, and for diabetes patients for whom weight loss could initiate remission.  

Obesity is defined by your body mass index (BMI) - a measure of body fat based on your weight in relation to your height. 

If you have a BMI of 30 or over, you are obese. If it's between 25 and 29.9, you're overweight.  

DentalSlim Diet Control is also a better option than expensive weight loss surgery, according to the Otago team, which costs thousands of pounds.

Weight loss surgery plays a major role in the management of morbid obesity, but it cannot be relied upon to manage the global epidemic of obesity, Professor Brunton believes. 

MailOnline has contacted Professor Brunton regarding how much the DentalSlim Diet Control would cost, and how far away it is from appearing on the market. 

The practice of surgically wiring people's jaws shut became popular in the 1980s, but it came with risks – namely, vomiting and the risk of choking, as well as gum disease after long-term use. 

In some cases, there were continuing issues with restriction of jaw movement and some developed acute psychiatric conditions. 

'Alternative strategies are required which may obviate surgery, or which reduce weight prior to surgery and so make it easier and safer,' Professor Brunton said. 

'The beauty of it is that once patients are fitted with the device, after two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged. 

'They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment.

'This would allow for a phased approach to weight loss support- term weight loss goals to be realised.'

In the trials, the volunteers were given a tool to open the device in an emergency, but none of them needed to use it. 

They all described the device as 'tolerable'. However, the design has since been improved, making it smaller to improve comfort. 

'Overall, people felt better about themselves, they had more confidence and they were committed to their weight loss journey,' Professor Brunton said. 

'It's hard yards – patients who really want to do this have to be committed.

'But for those people who are really struggling – and let's face it, that's millions of people across the world – this is a way of getting them back into normal lifestyle diet habits by really pump priming the process. 

'This could actually help a lot of people.' 

The terms 'obese' and 'overweight' are based on body mass index (BMI) – a measure of body fat based on your weight in relation to your height. 

Recent studies revealed 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight (with a BMI of between 25 and 29.9) and 650 million are obese (with a BMI of 30 or more). 

Being overweight or obese results in about 2.8 million deaths a year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). 

It is also estimated about 57 per cent of the world's adult population will be overweight or obese by 2030.  

In 2020, researchers observed a difference in weight loss between the sexes even when they stick to same amount of calories. 

Men found it easier to lose weight than women, they revealed. 

The findings came from The Direct Trial, a project led by Newcastle and Glasgow universities involving almost 300 men and women with type 2 diabetes.

They were put on a low-calorie (850 calories a day) diet to see if this would help them quickly lose 15 kg (about 2 st 3 lb) — a drop in weight it was hoped would reverse their diabetes.

'Both men and women were on the same amount of calories so there should be no confusion,' says Dr George Thom, a research dietitian at the University of Glasgow and co-author of the latest research.

The initial results, published in 2017 in The Lancet, found that half of the participants went into remission from type 2 diabetes.

But a new analysis (based on studying participants for another three years, published in the journal Diabetic Medicine) found that despite being asked to stick to virtually identical soups and shakes, there was a marked difference between the sexes.

After a year on the diet, the men had lost, on average, 11 per cent of their body weight. Women, by comparison, lost 8.4 per cent.

And the gap continued. After two years, men lost 8.5 per cent of their body weight and women lost 6.9 per cent. So why might this be?

'We had asked people to stop all their normal foods and replace them with four formulated shakes or soups a day, so it's really quite strict, and this 'black and white' approach to weight loss may suit men better,' said Dr Thom.

In other words, they stick to it.

'That's possibly because the diet culture targets women from an early age, whereas men are more likely to feel the need to lose weight in middle age, so women are more diet-weary,' he adds.

This fat distribution pattern in females tends to be protective against a host of metabolic health problems — a combination of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, according to various studies which have shown that subcutaneous fat is associated with better health.

On the other hand, the visceral fat seen in men leaves them at greater risk, particularly from cardiovascular disease.

The result is that when men lose fat, it's visceral fat, which improves metabolic risk factors leading to a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.

Women who diet are successfully losing subcutaneous fat, but without the same impressive results in either weight loss, the new study suggests, or marked health improvement.     

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Prof backs beleaguered apparatus

Otago Daily Times 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

You are not permitted to download, save or email this image. Visit image gallery to purchase the image.

The device was was widely ridiculed after being shared on social media yesterday afternoon, tweeters calling it "creepy" and "bizarre".

However, the project’s lead researcher, University of Otago health sciences pro-vice-chancellor Paul Brunton, said critics of the invention misunderstood the intention of the device.

Otago and United Kingdom researchers developed the world-first weight-loss device, which uses magnets to lock the mouth almost shut, to help fight the global obesity epidemic.

DentalSlim Diet Control is an intra-oral device fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth.

It used magnetic devices with unique custom-manufactured locking bolts.

Prof Brunton said it was not intended to be used for general weight-loss purposes, but instead for specific cases where there was a clinical need to lose weight quickly.

"Sometimes the first step [of losing weight] is quite difficult ... so it was developed with a view of being an additional treatment that could be used in selected cases where it’s appropriate."

Feedback from colleagues in the field had been positive he said.

The device allows the wearer to open their mouths only about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but it allows free speech and does not restrict breathing.

Participants in a Dunedin trial lost an average of 6.36kg in two weeks and were motivated to continue with their weight loss journey.

It would fitted by a dentist, and could be released by the user in case of an emergency and could be repeatedly fitted and removed.

"The main barrier for people for successful weight loss is compliance and this helps them establish new habits, allowing them to comply with a low-calorie diet for a period of time.

"It is a non-invasive, reversible, economical and attractive alternative to surgical procedures," Prof Brunton said.

The practice of surgically wiring people’s jaws shut became popular in the 1980s, but it came with risks; vomiting brought with it the risk of choking and after nine to 12 months the patients developed gum disease.

In some cases, there were continuing issues with restriction of jaw movement and some developed acute psychiatric conditions.

"Alternative strategies are required which may obviate surgery, or which reduce weight prior to surgery and so make it easier and safer.

"The beauty of it is that once patients are fitted with the device, after two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged.

"They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment."

Patients given the device described it as tolerable, though the design had since been improved.

"This could actually help a lot of people."

The research team consisted of Prof Brunton, Dr Jithendra Ratnayake, Dr Peter Mei and Dr Arthi Veerasamy, all of the University of Otago, Dr Jonathan Bodansky, of Leeds, and Dr Richard Hall, of RMH Consultancy, Leeds.

The paper was published in the British Dental Journal.

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Otago Uni weight-loss device slammed as 'creepy'

Otago Daily Times 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

You are not permitted to download, save or email this image. Visit image gallery to purchase the image.

The device was was widely ridiculed after being shared on social media yesterday afternoon, tweeters calling it "creepy" and "bizarre".

However, the project’s lead researcher, University of Otago health sciences pro-vice-chancellor Paul Brunton, said critics of the invention misunderstood the intention of the device.

Otago and United Kingdom researchers developed the world-first weight-loss device, which uses magnets to lock the mouth almost shut, to help fight the global obesity epidemic.

DentalSlim Diet Control is an intra-oral device fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth.

It used magnetic devices with unique custom-manufactured locking bolts.

Prof Brunton said it was not intended to be used for general weight-loss purposes, but instead for specific cases where there was a clinical need to lose weight quickly.

"Sometimes the first step [of losing weight] is quite difficult ... so it was developed with a view of being an additional treatment that could be used in selected cases where it’s appropriate."

Feedback from colleagues in the field had been positive he said.

The device allows the wearer to open their mouths only about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but it allows free speech and does not restrict breathing.

Participants in a Dunedin trial lost an average of 6.36kg in two weeks and were motivated to continue with their weight loss journey.

It would fitted by a dentist, and could be released by the user in case of an emergency and could be repeatedly fitted and removed.

"The main barrier for people for successful weight loss is compliance and this helps them establish new habits, allowing them to comply with a low-calorie diet for a period of time.

"It is a non-invasive, reversible, economical and attractive alternative to surgical procedures," Prof Brunton said.

The practice of surgically wiring people’s jaws shut became popular in the 1980s, but it came with risks; vomiting brought with it the risk of choking and after nine to 12 months the patients developed gum disease.

In some cases, there were continuing issues with restriction of jaw movement and some developed acute psychiatric conditions.

"Alternative strategies are required which may obviate surgery, or which reduce weight prior to surgery and so make it easier and safer.

"The beauty of it is that once patients are fitted with the device, after two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged.

"They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment."

Patients given the device described it as tolerable, though the design had since been improved.

"This could actually help a lot of people."

The research team consisted of Prof Brunton, Dr Jithendra Ratnayake, Dr Peter Mei and Dr Arthi Veerasamy, all of the University of Otago, Dr Jonathan Bodansky, of Leeds, and Dr Richard Hall, of RMH Consultancy, Leeds.

The paper was published in the British Dental Journal.

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Weight loss device developed in Dunedin locks mouth almost shut

Otago Daily Times 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

You are not permitted to download, save or email this image. Visit image gallery to purchase the image.

University of Otago and United Kingdom researchers developed the world-first weight-loss device, which uses magnets to lock the mouth almost shut, to help fight the global obesity epidemic.

DentalSlim Diet Control is an intra-oral device fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth. It used magnetic devices with unique custom-manufactured locking bolts.

It allowed the wearer to open their mouths only about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but it allowed free speech and doesn’t restrict breathing.

Participants in a Dunedin-based trial lost an average of 6.36kg in two weeks and were motivated to continue with their weight loss journey.

"It is a non-invasive, reversible, economical and attractive alternative to surgical procedures.

"The fact is, there are no adverse consequences with this device," Prof Brunton said.

Recent studies revealed 1.9 billion adults worldwide were overweight and 650 million were obese.

Being overweight or obese resulted in about 2.8 million deaths a year. It was estimated about 57% of the world’s adult population will be overweight or obese by 2030.

"In addition, psychological symptoms may be present, including embarrassment, depression and loss of self-esteem and obese people may suffer eating disorders together with stigmatisation and discrimination."

The tool could be particularly helpful for those having to lose weight before they can undergo surgery, and for diabetes patients for whom weight loss could initiate remission.

While bariatric surgery played a major role in the management of morbid obesity, it could not be relied upon to manage  what was a "global epidemic".

It costed about $24,000 and patients “live with the consequences of that for life, which can be quite unpleasant”.

“Alternative strategies are required which may obviate surgery, or which reduce weight prior to surgery and so make it easier and safer.

“The beauty of it is that once patients are fitted with the device, after two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged. They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment.

“This would allow for a phased approach to weight loss supported by advice from a dietician allowing long term weight loss goals to be realised.”

All the patients given the device described it as tolerable, the design has since been improved, making it smaller to improve functional comfort and aesthetics.

“Overall, people felt better about themselves, they had more confidence and they were committed to their weight loss journey.

"It’s hard yards. Patients who really want to do this have to be committed. But for those people who are really struggling - and let’s face it, that’s millions of people across the world - this is a way of getting them back into normal lifestyle diet habits by really pump priming the process.

"This could actually help a lot of people.”

The research team consisted of Prof Brunton, Dr Jithendra Ratnayake, Dr Peter Mei and Dr Arthi Veerasamy, all of Otago University, Dr Jonathan Bodansky, of Leeds, and Dr Richard Hall, of RMH Consultancy, Leeds. The paper was published in the British Dental Journal.

"DentalSlim Diet Control is an intra-oral device fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth" too bad if you don't have those teeth or you are wearing dentures.......

What about comfort factor for the device? The only other issue was psychological; the belief that the device was going to help them lose weight could be a factor in the results they got.

Too bad indeed. Obviously this solution is not going to be for everyone who needs to lose weight.

Please tell me this inhumane device is a prank?

Torture machine! Keep away from it...

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

These Scientists Created a Controversial ‘Weight-Loss Device’ that Locks People’s Jaws Shut

VICE 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

The DentalSlim Diet Control, developed by researchers at New Zealand’s University of Otago, is a magnetic contraption fitted to patients’ upper and lower back teeth that uses locking bolts to prevent them from properly opening their mouths – and, in turn, eating solid foods.

“It allows the wearer to open their mouths only about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but it allows free speech and doesn’t restrict breathing,” the University of Otago said in a media release on Monday. “Participants in a Dunedin-based trial lost an average of 6.36kg [about 14 pounds] in two weeks and were motivated to continue with their weight loss journey.”

“The fact is,” Professor Brunton said, “there are no adverse consequences with this device.”

Many disagreed. Within hours of the University of Otago announcing the apparatus on Twitter, detractors were lashing out at it, with some calling the device “evil,” “hateful” and “disturbing.” Others pointed out that obesity is often the product of complex factors including biology and socioeconomic disadvantage, and not something that can be resolved by simply clamping people’s mouths shut. More than a handful described the DentalSlim Diet Control as a “torture device.”

The University of Otago Twitter account has since backpedalled, posting several follow-up tweets that sought to better explain their position.

“To clarify, the intention of the device is not intended as a quick or long-term weight-loss tool; rather it is aimed to assist people who need to undergo surgery and who cannot have the surgery until they have lost weight,” the University claimed. “After two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged and device removed. They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment. This would allow for a phased approach to weight loss supported by advice from a dietician.”

This may also be the reason they’re calling it a “world-first” device in spite of the fact there have been numerous similar contraptions since as far back as the Middle Ages – more recently as a controversial and extreme method of attempted weight loss in countries such as Nigeria and South Africa.

The paper conceded that participants indicated they “occasionally had discomfort and felt that life in general was less satisfying,” but concluded overall that participants “tolerated the device for a two-week period with satisfactory weight loss.”

Professor Brunton did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Weight loss device locks jaw shut with magnets to restrict eating

Insider 29 June, 2021 - 01:31am

Dubbed the Dentalslim Diet Control, the device uses magnets to restrict the jaw from opening by more than 2 millimeters, while still allowing users to breath normally. It includes an emergency release mechanism in case of choking or a panic attack. 

It's designed to make sure patients stick to a liquid diet, according to lead researcher Paul Brunton of the University of Otago. 

"The main barrier for people for successful weight loss is compliance and this helps them establish new habits," Brunton said in a press release

The device was tested on seven healthy volunteers with obesity who followed a liquid diet of 1,200 calories a day. They lost an average of 14 pounds in the two week study, published June 25 in the British Dental Journal.

The participants reported they were satisfied with the results and motivated to continue. They also had trouble speaking, felt uncomfortable, tense, and embarrassed, and generally felt their quality of life was worse, the researchers wrote. 

The announcement of the device generated immediate backlash on Twitter, with critics comparing it to a torture instrument from the "Saw" horror movie franchise. 

Commentators said the concept pathologizes and punishes people in larger bodies.

Previously, doctors have tried to treat obesity by using orthodontic wires to hold the jaw partially closed. Research suggests patients did lose weight, but regained it when the wires were removed. The procedure also had a risk of causing choking and gum disease.

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