Nintendo Switch OLED pre-orders now live: where to buy the new console

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Eurogamer.net 09 July, 2021 - 02:00am 31 views

What is the Nintendo switch OLED?

The Nintendo Switch OLED edition is exactly that, a Nintendo Switch with a slightly bigger, brighter OLED screen as its main draw, combined with improved sound, larger base storage and a wired LAN port. ... The internals of this new Switch are identical to the current one, including the battery. ForbesWho Is The Nintendo Switch OLED Model For, Exactly?

Is the switch OLED the switch pro?

It's officially called the Nintendo Switch (OLED model), eschewing the rumoured Nintendo Switch Pro moniker. And it's quite an upgrade, offering a 7-inch OLED screen and enhanced audio. It will launch this October, nearly a year after the PS5 and Xbox Series X went on sale. What Hi-Fi?Nintendo Switch OLED: price, release date, specs and all the details

What is the new Nintendo switch?

Nintendo has announced a new version of the Nintendo Switch, due out on 8 October this year. The Nintendo Switch OLED model will have a larger and brighter 7in screen, a wide kickstand for tabletop play, enhanced audio in handheld mode and 64GB of storage for games. The GuardianNew Nintendo Switch model announced for October

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The OLED Switch is not the Switch Pro, and that's ok

Engadget 10 July, 2021 - 01:35am

The Nintendo Switch OLED is a let-down for TV mode purists

TrustedReviews 10 July, 2021 - 01:35am

The main selling point of the Nintendo Switch is obvious: you can use it as both a handheld device and a console but Nintendo has been neglecting the latter use case ever since it first launched the Switch. 

While the Switch Lite increases the portable prowess of the console, I expected Nintendo to improve the ‘docked mode’ experience with the fabled Switch Pro. But the newly revealed Switch OLED has done the opposite, once again focusing on the portable method of play with a new OLED panel.

4K output had previously been rumoured, and while it didn’t make much sense for portable mode, I did fancy the idea of Nintendo putting a more powerful GPU inside the dock to allow for 4K upscaling. Maybe it could have even allowed the Switch OLED to natively play titles that can currently only be played via the cloud such as Control, Hitman 3 and the upcoming Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy. 

Or maybe Nintendo could have just fitted in a slightly more powerful Nvidia chip, ensuring a smoother performance so you don’t encounter framerate drops in action-packed scenes. Even New Pokémon Snap has suffered this issue.

Sadly, the only improvement that Nintendo has introduced to the dock is a new LAN port to allow for smoother online connections. This is a good addition, but hardly a game changer when accessories are already available to bypass this obstacle. The Switch OLED also includes an expanded 64GB storage capacity, but again, microSD cards are so affordable right now that it hasn’t really been a problem. I’d have preferred a more powerful chipset.

I’m genuinely surprised by the Switch OLED’s poor offering for those who use TV mode the most, especially since Nintendo has so many couch multiplayer titles such as Super Smash Bros Ultimate, Mario Kart, Mario Party and more. 

I understand Nintendo didn’t want to split the game library with this new Switch, but that hasn’t stopped Nintendo introducing more powerful handhelds halfway through a generation before – the New Nintendo 3DS springs to mind.

If you never use the Switch as a portable, there simply isn’t a good enough reason to justify the cost of the Switch OLED. And with the original Switch launching as far back as 2017, it’s looking increasingly unlikely that Nintendo will improve the TV mode before it launches the fully fledged sequel. 

If you primarily use the Switch in its TV dock, are you disappointed by the lack of upgrade options? Or are you perfectly happy using the vanilla console for the foreseeable future? Let us know by firing over a message on Twitter

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Editorial independence means being able to give an unbiased verdict about a product or company, with the avoidance of conflicts of interest. To ensure this is possible, every member of the editorial staff follows a clear code of conduct.

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New Nintendo Switch: The New OLED Screen vs. LCD, And Why It Matters - IGN

IGN 06 July, 2021 - 05:31pm

But what does that mean exactly? Well, previous Nintendo Switch models used an LCD display. While it does not sound like a significant upgrade, there are a few benefits from switching from an LCD to an OLED display.

The big difference between LCD and OLED screens are that they use different methods to light up and display an image on the screen. The screen, whether a TV or a tablet, uses display pixels; the image you see on a screen is produced by combining blue, green, and red subpixels to generate colors you see on a screen, but require to be lit up for the color combinations to appear.

LCD or Liquid-crystal displays use one or more backlights which is essentially a panel as large as the actual gadget's screen, to create a constant white light anytime you power on the screen, thus evenly lighting everything. However, the caveat with LCDs is that it draws a lot of power, which can be a downside for devices like smartphones that use an LCD, such as the original Nintendo Switch, yet LCDs are also inexpensive.

OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diodes), however, do not rely on backlights. Instead, it has self-lit pixels. The pixels in OLED display work on a pixel-by-pixel basis, meaning it will only light up where there is an image to display, thus creating a better contrast than an LCD and has a lower power consumption. But the OLED displays are pricier than LCDs and do not get as bright as an LCD.

Both displays have their advantages and disadvantages, so the main takeaway for the new Nintendo Switch replacing the LCD with an OLED is that the device should provide deeper blacks, better contrast, a lower power draw, increased brightness, and improved image quality.

With a lower power consumption, that would mean, in theory, that the Nintendo Switch with an OLED screen should have a better battery performance. However, both Switch iterations are powered by a 4310mAh Lithium-ion battery, with both sharing the same battery life expectancy before it needs a charge. But as Nintendo notes, the battery life varies on the games you play.

Unfortunately, the new Nintendo Switch model will not feature an improved processor, meaning that it won't be able to output in 4K. It will also use the same Joy-Cons as before — suggesting that persistent issues like Joy-Con drift will not be addressed with this new model. That makes the OLED screen the main selling point for this new version of the Switch, which at $350 may be too much for existing Switch owners.

Either way, we'll have a better idea of what the Nintendo Switch OLED version has to offer when it releases October 8.

New Nintendo Switch: The New OLED Screen vs. LCD, And Why It Matters - IGN

IGN 06 July, 2021 - 05:31pm

But what does that mean exactly? Well, previous Nintendo Switch models used an LCD display. While it does not sound like a significant upgrade, there are a few benefits from switching from an LCD to an OLED display.

The big difference between LCD and OLED screens are that they use different methods to light up and display an image on the screen. The screen, whether a TV or a tablet, uses display pixels; the image you see on a screen is produced by combining blue, green, and red subpixels to generate colors you see on a screen, but require to be lit up for the color combinations to appear.

LCD or Liquid-crystal displays use one or more backlights which is essentially a panel as large as the actual gadget's screen, to create a constant white light anytime you power on the screen, thus evenly lighting everything. However, the caveat with LCDs is that it draws a lot of power, which can be a downside for devices like smartphones that use an LCD, such as the original Nintendo Switch, yet LCDs are also inexpensive.

OLEDs (Organic Light Emitting Diodes), however, do not rely on backlights. Instead, it has self-lit pixels. The pixels in OLED display work on a pixel-by-pixel basis, meaning it will only light up where there is an image to display, thus creating a better contrast than an LCD and has a lower power consumption. But the OLED displays are pricier than LCDs and do not get as bright as an LCD.

Both displays have their advantages and disadvantages, so the main takeaway for the new Nintendo Switch replacing the LCD with an OLED is that the device should provide deeper blacks, better contrast, a lower power draw, increased brightness, and improved image quality.

With a lower power consumption, that would mean, in theory, that the Nintendo Switch with an OLED screen should have a better battery performance. However, both Switch iterations are powered by a 4310mAh Lithium-ion battery, with both sharing the same battery life expectancy before it needs a charge. But as Nintendo notes, the battery life varies on the games you play.

Unfortunately, the new Nintendo Switch model will not feature an improved processor, meaning that it won't be able to output in 4K. It will also use the same Joy-Cons as before — suggesting that persistent issues like Joy-Con drift will not be addressed with this new model. That makes the OLED screen the main selling point for this new version of the Switch, which at $350 may be too much for existing Switch owners.

Either way, we'll have a better idea of what the Nintendo Switch OLED version has to offer when it releases October 8.

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