'No Time To Die' gives Daniel Craig's last outing as James Bond the top box office spot in opening weekend

Entertainment

Fox Business 10 October, 2021 - 02:36pm 10 views

Where did they film No Time to Die?

Filming locations included Italy, Jamaica, Norway, the Faroe Islands and London, in addition to Pinewood Studios. In March 2019, production commenced in Nittedal, Norway, with the second unit capturing scenes at a frozen lake. On 28 April 2019, principal photography officially began in Jamaica, including Port Antonio. wikipedia.orgNo Time to Die - Wikipedia

Who is the villain in No Time to Die?

Every great James Bond movie need its villain – and in No Time To Die, it's Rami Malek's job to frighten the living daylights out of 007. He plays Safin, a mysterious figure linked to the past of Lea Seydoux's Madeleine Swann and wreaking havoc for the future of Daniel Craig's Bond in typically theatrical style. EmpireRami Malek Interview: No Time To Die, How Freddie Mercury Influenced Safin, And Working With Daniel Craig

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After over 18 months of pandemic delays, "No Time to Die" opened on target. The final James Bond film of the Daniel Craig era grossed $56 million from 4,407 North American theaters, according to studio estimates on Sunday, to easily take the first-place spot.

It didn’t break any pandemic or 007 records, but it didn’t fall significantly short either and is in fact the fourth-best opening in the 25-film series. James Bond isn't Marvel when it comes to opening weekends. Bond has always had an older audience which is typically less inclined to rush out for the first weekend. In fact, the best Bond opening ever didn’t even crack $100 million. It was $88.4 million for "Skyfall" which debuted to in 2012.

"It’s been a long time coming to get this movie on the big screen," said Erik Lomis, the head of distribution for United Artists Releasing. "It’s right where we thought it would be and right where tracking predicted it would be."

Cary Joji Fukunaga directed this installment, which co-stars Lea Seydoux, Ben Whishaw, Naomie Harris, Ana de Armas, Lashana Lynch and Rami Malek, as the antagonist. Both critics and audiences have responded positively (84% on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore). According to exit data, audiences were heavily male (64%) and over 35 (57%).

Unlike many films released during the pandemic, a streaming or hybrid release was never even a consideration for "No Time to Die." In addition to being the longest Bond film ever at two hours and 43 minutes, it was also an expensive one with a reported production budget of around $250 million. And that doesn’t include marketing costs, which reportedly exceeded $100 million.

"Michael Wilson and Barbara Broccoli are huge believers in the theatrical experience," Lomis said of the film's producers. "They delivered us a terrific movie and together we held it for theatrical. That was hugely important to us, to them and to the theater owners. And when you see this kind of result, it’s very gratifying."

According to North American distributor United Artists Releasing, 25% of moviegoers returned to theaters for the first time in 18 months this weekend, suggesting that the film will have legs.

"That, I thought, was a pretty significant statistic," Lomis added.

He said he’s been getting calls from theater owners around the country saying that audiences have been regularly applauding at the end of the movie.

But the profitability of Bond movies ultimately comes down to international, which in the Craig era has regularly accounted for over 70% of the global total. "No Time to Die" launched abroad last weekend, with Universal handling some territories and MGM others, and as of Sunday global grosses were estimated to be over $313.3 million.

"This movie became bigger than life because it was really the first high profile movie to move off of its release date when the pandemic began," said Paul Dergarabedian, Comscore's senior media analyst. "To have Bond still be appealing and viable and relevant some 60 years on is quite amazing."

In second place was last week’s No. 1 film " Venom: Let There Be Carnage," which fell 64% from its record $90 million launch, earning $32 million in its second weekend. The Sony sequel, which is also playing exclusively in movie theaters, has earned $185.6 million globally to date.

Aside from Bond, it was a relatively quiet week at the box office. Other newcomers included A24’s haunting Icelandic film "Lamb," which earned $1 million from only 583 theaters and Bleecker Street’s "Mass," which opened on four screens to $14,457.

Meanwhile, Disney is expecting on Monday to cross the $2 billion in global box office earnings in 2021. And the momentum should keep going through October, with "Halloween Kills" and "Dune," which has already made $117 million internationally, on the horizon.

"A year ago we were in dire straights," Dergarabedian said. "The year to date is now 32% up from last year. We’re gaining ground here and we have a lot of big movies on the way. The industry is chugging along and ‘Halloween Kills’ could be much bigger than anyone expects."

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. "No Time to Die," $56 million.

2. "Venom: Let There Be Carnage," $32 million.

3. "The Addams Family 2," $10 million.

4. "Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings," $4.2 million.

5. "The Many Saints of Newark," $1.5 million.

8. "Dear Evan Hansen," $1 million.

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Read full article at Fox Business

Daniel Craig gets a 007 sendoff like no other. How Sean Connery, Roger Moore said goodbye to Bond

USA TODAY 10 October, 2021 - 07:12pm

Disney announced on the Disney Parks Blog that their new itinerary system will be launching in mid-October.

The Disney Genie service is being touted by the parks as letting you create "your best Disney day," and will be available inside your My Disney Experience app starting Oct. 19.

Officials say the new service will give you more flexibility with your day at the parks.

The system will prioritize ways to reduce time spent in lines, help you pace your day and build around your existing plans like dinner reservations.

The launch will coincide with the introduction of the Lightning Lane entrances throughout the parks.

The Lightning Lanes will be available for purchase through the Disney Genie+ add-on, however "most highly demanded attractions" will need to be purchased individually.

Individual Lightning Lane selections will include rides like Star Wars: Rise of Resistance at Disney's Hollywood Studios and Frozen Ever After at Epcot.

The Disney Genie+ service will cost $15 a day, however, the cost for the individual Lightning Lane selections will vary by day, attraction and park.

Purchase will be made the same day of your visit. You can purchase individual selections for up to two different attractions a day.

Click here to see the full list of attractions in each category.

READ THE FULL STORY:Disney Genie, Lightning Lanes finally have launch date

CHECK OUT WESH:Stay in the know with the latest Orlando news, weather and sports. Get the top stories and all the scores from the team at WESH.

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'No Time To Die' gives Daniel Craig's last outing as James Bond the top box office spot in opening weekend

Honolulu Star-Advertiser 10 October, 2021 - 02:36pm

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This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - New Privacy Policy

After over 18 months of pandemic delays, "No Time to Die" opened on target. The final James Bond film of the Daniel Craig era grossed $56 million from 4,407 North American theaters, according to studio estimates on Sunday, to easily take the first-place spot.

It didn’t break any pandemic or 007 records, but it didn’t fall significantly short either and is in fact the fourth-best opening in the 25-film series. James Bond isn't Marvel when it comes to opening weekends. Bond has always had an older audience which is typically less inclined to rush out for the first weekend. In fact, the best Bond opening ever didn’t even crack $100 million. It was $88.4 million for "Skyfall" which debuted to in 2012.

"It’s been a long time coming to get this movie on the big screen," said Erik Lomis, the head of distribution for United Artists Releasing. "It’s right where we thought it would be and right where tracking predicted it would be."

Cary Joji Fukunaga directed this installment, which co-stars Lea Seydoux, Ben Whishaw, Naomie Harris, Ana de Armas, Lashana Lynch and Rami Malek, as the antagonist. Both critics and audiences have responded positively (84% on Rotten Tomatoes and an A- CinemaScore). According to exit data, audiences were heavily male (64%) and over 35 (57%).

Unlike many films released during the pandemic, a streaming or hybrid release was never even a consideration for "No Time to Die." In addition to being the longest Bond film ever at two hours and 43 minutes, it was also an expensive one with a reported production budget of around $250 million. And that doesn’t include marketing costs, which reportedly exceeded $100 million.

"Michael Wilson and Barbara Broccoli are huge believers in the theatrical experience," Lomis said of the film's producers. "They delivered us a terrific movie and together we held it for theatrical. That was hugely important to us, to them and to the theater owners. And when you see this kind of result, it’s very gratifying."

According to North American distributor United Artists Releasing, 25% of moviegoers returned to theaters for the first time in 18 months this weekend, suggesting that the film will have legs.

"That, I thought, was a pretty significant statistic," Lomis added.

He said he’s been getting calls from theater owners around the country saying that audiences have been regularly applauding at the end of the movie.

But the profitability of Bond movies ultimately comes down to international, which in the Craig era has regularly accounted for over 70% of the global total. "No Time to Die" launched abroad last weekend, with Universal handling some territories and MGM others, and as of Sunday global grosses were estimated to be over $313.3 million.

"This movie became bigger than life because it was really the first high profile movie to move off of its release date when the pandemic began," said Paul Dergarabedian, Comscore's senior media analyst. "To have Bond still be appealing and viable and relevant some 60 years on is quite amazing."

In second place was last week’s No. 1 film " Venom: Let There Be Carnage," which fell 64% from its record $90 million launch, earning $32 million in its second weekend. The Sony sequel, which is also playing exclusively in movie theaters, has earned $185.6 million globally to date.

Aside from Bond, it was a relatively quiet week at the box office. Other newcomers included A24’s haunting Icelandic film "Lamb," which earned $1 million from only 583 theaters and Bleecker Street’s "Mass," which opened on four screens to $14,457.

Meanwhile, Disney is expecting on Monday to cross the $2 billion in global box office earnings in 2021. And the momentum should keep going through October, with "Halloween Kills" and "Dune," which has already made $117 million internationally, on the horizon.

"A year ago we were in dire straights," Dergarabedian said. "The year to date is now 32% up from last year. We’re gaining ground here and we have a lot of big movies on the way. The industry is chugging along and ‘Halloween Kills’ could be much bigger than anyone expects."

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Comscore. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. "No Time to Die," $56 million.

2. "Venom: Let There Be Carnage," $32 million.

3. "The Addams Family 2," $10 million.

4. "Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings," $4.2 million.

5. "The Many Saints of Newark," $1.5 million.

8. "Dear Evan Hansen," $1 million.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. FAQ - New Privacy Policy

Ah, Mr Bond. I was expecting you – to entertain me | David Mitchell

The Guardian 10 October, 2021 - 04:00am

The main spoiler is: they’ve spoiled it. The producers of No Time to Die have spoiled Bond – either a bit or totally, only time will tell. It’s an enjoyable film: it’s exciting, it looks great and is, perhaps surprisingly, quite a conventional Bond film in structure. It’s a bit grittier aesthetically than in the franchise’s 1960s and 70s camp pomp, but the fights, the attractive people, the exotic locations, the snazzy cars, the cheesy gadgets, the wacky villains and the stolen super weapon are all in place.

The problem with it is that, at the end, James Bond dies. I really hope that everyone still reading either already knew that or doesn’t give a shit about James Bond, though I warn the latter group: I’m not going to get on to anything important like economics or gardening. This whole Bond death thing is buzzing around my head like a miniaturised Sean Connery on Little Nellie.

James Bond shouldn’t die. It’s a key attribute of the character that he doesn’t. He’s a man called James Bond who gets into exceptionally dangerous scrapes and doesn’t die. Those are the three main things. Everything else is subject to change: his appearance, accent, the extent and nature of his misogyny, his choice of gun, his favourite car. They’ve had him drinking Heineken for the last couple of films and it just about holds and we all understand it probably buys us a couple of extra car chases. Fine. But if you make him die, you might as well change his name to Eric. I wouldn’t have minded a film about someone called Eric Bond who died. Instead of the dangerous scrapes, it could be a family drama about the scourge of cancer.

And he definitely dies. They’re not playing with the idea, like at the start of You Only Live Twice. You don’t actually see his corpse, but there’s no twinkly possibility left open that he escaped. What happens in the story – the canonical story made by Eon Productions and endorsed by Ian Fleming’s estate – is that James Bond, agent 007, is killed. At the end of the credits it still says “James Bond will return” but I’m assuming it will be a prequel, a telling of another part of his life. The death of James Bond at the end of No Time to Die is, and will remain, the character’s fate.

The fact that the film’s title encapsulates my feelings about this creative choice is a joke I’m sure the film-makers are entirely in control of. They’re very clever and, as many of those who enjoyed the film will certainly be clamouring to tell me, the death is beautifully, perhaps brilliantly, done. It’s exceptionally affecting and sad. Daniel Craig has turned the character into someone much more real, with human emotions, needs and weaknesses, whose thrill-packed but ultimately vacuous peripatetic lifestyle has left him desolate and broken. It is well directed and brilliantly performed and the film ends with an elegant if melancholic coda that genuinely says something insightful about storytelling.

The trappings of human drama – plausible characterisation, sadness, empathy, tragedy, loss – are an easy way to stop a film being boring. But it’s a technique that displaces boredom with anguish, not fun, and that’s not what Bond films are supposed to do. Craig is a great actor and, throughout his James Bond tenure, has clearly yearned to make the character a believable human being. But the job of playing James Bond is to remain watchable despite not being believable. That’s harder than acting – it requires magnetic star power. Only Sean Connery ever really mastered it, but all of the others, except Craig, at least tried.

The climax of the film is riveting and tragic, but it’s not just Craig’s acting or the film’s direction that gives it its power – we are moved because of the vast hinterland of warmth and nostalgia we feel for a character we’ve been watching all our lives. The current film-makers are wantonly expending emotional capital the vast majority of which was earned by other people. A precious resource has been squandered in one attention-grabbing and ultimately miserable moment.

As a result, every film, every scene, every hat landed on a hatstand, every grin at Desmond Llewelyn’s sternness, is now brutally recontextualised. When Connery wins at roulette, when Roger Moore attempts re-entry, when Pierce Brosnan merrily drives a tank through St Petersburg, they are all portraying a man destined to lie bleeding, heartbroken and alone, missing the daughter he never really knew, waiting to be blown to bits by his own country’s missiles. It’s quite the buzzkill.

It’s not the producers’ fault that the release was delayed by a pandemic, but what would have been a bad idea before Covid is a real kick in the teeth after it. The world has been overwhelmed by loss and, as we tentatively try to embrace life’s pleasures again with a trip to the cinema, we are made to watch James Bond die.

At the beginning of The Spy Who Loved Me, a famous sequence ends with Bond skiing off a cliff and falling, in silence, towards what looks like his inevitable demise. Then a union jack parachute opens, the Bond theme kicks in and all is well. It’s ridiculous but lovable. It makes us feel happy. This time, I waited for that moment in vain. To my mind, that’s a far cheaper trick.

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