Ohio judge ordered hospital to use ivermectin to treat COVID-19 patient

Health

Business Insider 30 August, 2021 - 10:42pm 39 views

Butler County Judge Gregory Howard ruled in favor of a woman who asked that her husband, who is on a ventilator with COVID-19 at West Chester Hospital — located north of Cincinnati — be treated with the unproven drug, the Ohio Capital Journal and The Enquirer reported.

Jeffrey Smith, 51, contracted COVID-19 in early July. His wife, Julie Smith, asked the court on August 20 for an emergency order to have the drug used on her husband.

On August 23, Howard ruled that Dr. Fred Wagshul should be allowed to give Smith 30 mg of the drug daily for three weeks, WXIX reported.

Wagshul is a pulmonologist in Dayton, Ohio, who cofounded the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance, a nonprofit that touts the use of ivermectin for COVID-19.

"From the countries that we've seen that have emptied their hospitals, this medicine is very, very effective," Wagshul told WXIX.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration, however, have warned that the drug is not proved to treat COVID-19 and can have serious side effects.

Wagshul and the FLCCC did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

In a health advisory last week, the CDC said the FDA-approved drug could be safely used to treat some parasitic infections but could be harmful in other settings.

The CDC is especially concerned as calls to poison control rise from people taking variations of the drug meant for horses and cows. Poison-control calls about the drug rose fivefold last month compared with the baseline number of calls before the pandemic, the CDC said.

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Ivermectin Demand Surges Though It Doesn’t Work for Covid-19

The New York Times 31 August, 2021 - 06:40am

Prescriptions for ivermectin have jumped to more than 88,000 per week, some pharmacists are reporting shortages and people are overdosing on forms of the drug meant for horses.

For the past week, Dr. Gregory Yu, an emergency physician in San Antonio, has received the same daily requests from his patients, some vaccinated for Covid-19 and others unvaccinated: They ask him for ivermectin, a drug typically used to treat parasitic worms that has repeatedly failed in clinical trials to help people infected with the coronavirus.

Dr. Yu has refused the ivermectin requests, he said, but he knows some of his colleagues have not. Prescriptions for ivermectin have seen a sharp rise in recent weeks, jumping to more than 88,000 per week in mid-August from a prepandemic baseline average of 3,600 per week, according to researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Some pharmacists are even reporting shortages of the drug. Travis Walthall, a pharmacist in Kuna, Idaho, a town of about 20,000 people, said that this summer alone he had filled more than 20 ivermectin prescriptions, up from two or three in a typical year. For the past week he has not been able to obtain the drug from his suppliers; they were all out.

Mr. Walthall was astonished, he said, at how many people were willing to take an unapproved drug for Covid. “I’m like, gosh, this is horrible,” he said.

While sometimes given to humans in small doses for head lice, scabies and other parasites, ivermectin is more commonly used in animals. Physicians are raising alarms about a growing number of people getting the drug from livestock supply centers, where it can come in highly concentrated paste or liquid forms.

Calls to poison control centers about ivermectin exposures have risen dramatically, jumping fivefold over their baseline in July, according to C.D.C. researchers, who cited data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Mississippi’s health department said earlier this month that 70 percent of recent calls to the state poison control center had come from people who ingested ivermectin from livestock supply stores.

Dr. Shawn Varney, a toxicologist and medical director for the South Texas Poison Center, said that in 2019 his center received 191 calls about exposure to ivermectin; so far this year the center has received 260 calls and is on pace to reach 390 by the end of the year. The vast majority of the recent calls came from people who took a veterinary product in an attempt to treat or prevent Covid-19.

“Everyone wants some cure for Covid because it’s such a devastating illness,” Dr. Varney said. “I plead with people to stop using ivermectin and get the vaccine because it’s the best protection we have at this point. Everything else is risk after risk.”

Dr. Varney said people calling the poison control center after taking ivermectin sometimes reported nausea, muscle pain and diarrhea. He noted that there have been ivermectin overdose deaths in the past, though he did not know of any specifically associated with Covid-19.

The biggest risk, he added, comes from people taking the livestock product and ingesting a far higher dose than is appropriate for humans — sometimes 10 to 15 times the amount that a capsule approved for humans might contain.

“People are going to animal feed stores and getting a formulation that’s highly concentrated because it’s for 1,000-pound animals,” Dr. Varney said. “They’re opening themselves to great potential harm.”

Ivermectin was introduced as a veterinary drug in the late 1970s, and the discovery of its effectiveness in combating certain parasitic diseases in humans won the 2015 Nobel Prize for medicine.

Though it has not been shown to be effective in treating Covid, people are now clamoring to get the drug, trading tips in Facebook groups and on Reddit. Some physicians have compared the phenomenon to last year’s surge of interest in hydroxychloroquine, though there are more clinical trials evaluating ivermectin.

The Food and Drug Administration weighed in last week. “You are not a horse,” the agency tweeted, with a warning explaining that ivermectin is not F.D.A.-approved for treating or preventing Covid-19 and that taking large doses can cause serious harm.

A recent review of 14 ivermectin studies, with more than 1,600 participants, concluded that none provided evidence of the drug’s ability to prevent Covid, improve patient conditions or reduce mortality. Another 31 studies are still underway to test the drug.

“There is great interest in repurposing well-known inexpensive drugs such as ivermectin that are readily available as an oral tablet,” Maria-Inti Metzendorf and Stephanie Weibel, the authors of the review, said in an email to The Times. “Even if these circumstances seem ideal, the results from the available clinical studies carried out so far cannot confirm the widely advertised benefits.”

One of the largest trials studying ivermectin for Covid-19 treatment, called the Together Trial, was halted by the data safety monitoring board on Aug. 6 because the drug had been shown to be no better than a placebo at preventing hospitalization or prolonged stay in the emergency room. Dr. Edward Mills, a professor at McMaster University who led the study, which enrolled more than 1,300 patients, said the team would have discontinued it earlier were it not for the level of public interest in ivermectin.

“The data safety person said, ‘This is now futile and you’re offering no benefit to patients involved in the trial,’” Dr. Mills said.

Another study of the drug found that ivermectin could be fairly benign unless taken at high doses. Dr. Eduardo López-Medina, a researcher at the Center for Pediatric Infectious Diseases in Colombia, led a randomized control trial for the study last spring on the effects of ivermectin and found that it had no statistically significant effect on reducing the duration of Covid symptoms. But he also found that there was no statistically significant increase in adverse events for the patients receiving ivermectin, though they were taking a fairly high dose of 300 micrograms per kilogram.

“It appears to be a safe medication, but that is not enough to prescribe it openly,” Dr. López-Medina said. “People should use it in trials but not necessarily to treat patients. The data is not robust enough to support its use.”

Researchers and physicians are particularly alarmed by people seeking out ivermectin as a form of possible prevention or treatment instead of getting one of the highly effective Covid vaccines. The F.D.A. fully approved the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid vaccine for people 16 and older last week, and an approval of Moderna’s vaccine is expected in the coming weeks.

“The only functional strategy we have for getting control of Covid-19 is vaccination,” said Dr. Irwin Redlener, a physician in New York and founding director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University. “If people are not getting vaccinated because of nonsense they’re reading on the internet, that interferes with our ability to get this pandemic under control.”

An Ohio judge ordered a hospital to use the deworming drug ivermectin to treat a patient with COVID-19

Business Insider 31 August, 2021 - 12:00am

Butler County Judge Gregory Howard ruled in favor of a woman who asked that her husband, who is on a ventilator with COVID-19 at West Chester Hospital — located north of Cincinnati — be treated with the unproven drug, the Ohio Capital Journal and The Enquirer reported.

Jeffrey Smith, 51, contracted COVID-19 in early July. His wife, Julie Smith, asked the court on August 20 for an emergency order to have the drug used on her husband.

On August 23, Howard ruled that Dr. Fred Wagshul should be allowed to give Smith 30 mg of the drug daily for three weeks, WXIX reported.

Wagshul is a pulmonologist in Dayton, Ohio, who cofounded the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance, a nonprofit that touts the use of ivermectin for COVID-19.

"From the countries that we've seen that have emptied their hospitals, this medicine is very, very effective," Wagshul told WXIX.

Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration, however, have warned that the drug is not proved to treat COVID-19 and can have serious side effects.

Wagshul and the FLCCC did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

In a health advisory last week, the CDC said the FDA-approved drug could be safely used to treat some parasitic infections but could be harmful in other settings.

The CDC is especially concerned as calls to poison control rise from people taking variations of the drug meant for horses and cows. Poison-control calls about the drug rose fivefold last month compared with the baseline number of calls before the pandemic, the CDC said.

Rand Paul says scientists won't study horse-deworming drug ivermectin's use as a potential COVID cure because of their 'hatred for Trump'

Yahoo! Voices 29 August, 2021 - 11:57pm

Paul said he was "in the middle" on whether ivermectin should be used and wanted more research done.

The FDA and CDC are asking people to avoid the drug, which is used to deworm horses and cows.

See more stories on Insider's business page.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said researchers won't study the toxic livestock-deworming drug ivermectin as a potential COVID treatment because of their dislike for former President Donald Trump.

The Cincinnati Enquirer first reported on the remarks Paul made at a town hall event for 60 people held at the Cold Spring City Council chambers on August 27.

"The hatred for Trump deranged these people so much that they're unwilling to objectively study it," Paul said, The Cincinnati Enquirer reported. "So someone like me that's in the middle on it, I can't tell you because they will not study ivermectin. They will not study hydroxychloroquine without the taint of their hatred for Donald Trump."

Paul told The Cincinnati Enquirer that he doesn't know whether ivermectin works, but that he keeps "an open mind."

Trump has not pushed ivermectin but has continually advocated for using hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID. But neither drug has proved to be effective in preventing or curing COVID-19 infections, and US health authorities have warned people against using them.

Scientists are studying ivermectin as a coronavirus treatment, and they previously investigated hydroxychloroquine as well. In the US, the National Institutes of Health is conducting a large, late-stage trial to see whether ivermectin can help people with mild or moderate COVID-19 cases feel better more quickly. The University of Oxford's PRINCIPLE trial is also studying ivermectin as a COVID-19 treatment.

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration urged people not to self-medicate with ivermectin because it is intended for horses and other livestock.

-U.S. FDA (@US_FDA) August 21, 2021

The FDA also said in a statement that it received reports that people were being hospitalized after using the drug. It acknowledged that initial research was being carried out on the drug's efficacy but that the formula used for animals differed greatly from what humans were supposed to take.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also released a health advisory last week, cautioning that people could become severely ill from self-medicating with ivermectin because an overdose could cause a coma, seizures, and death. Even the milder side effects of taking too much ivermectin are extremely unpleasant, the FDA said, and include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, dizziness, and other allergic reactions.

Nonetheless, people continue to take ivermectin. The CDC's numbers showed that from early July until the week of August 13, pharmacies filled more than 88,000 prescriptions of ivermectin.

Clinical studies have also shown that hydroxychloroquine, an antimalarial drug, does not help treat or prevent COVID-19. The FDA cautioned against using hydroxychloroquine after finding that the drug could cause serious heart problems, blood and lymph-node disorders, kidney injuries, and liver problems, including liver failure.

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Kentucky senator tells constituents he is ‘in the middle’ on use of deworming medication FDA has implored Americans not to take Senator Rand Paul: ‘The hatred for Trump deranged these people so much, they’re unwilling to objectively study it.’ Photograph: Rex/Shutterstock Federal researchers will not objectively study ivermectin as a treatment for Covid-19, the Kentucky senator Rand Paul claimed, because “hatred for Donald Trump” has tainted their view of those who say the drug used to deworm ho

After people began purchasing doses meant for horses in order to self-medicate for the coronavirus, the FDA warned against using the drug.

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