Osama bin Laden was found because his family hung their clothes out to dry

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Fox News 31 July, 2021 - 11:51am 45 views

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'Justice with Judge Jeanine' host Jeanine Pirro gives her legal analysis, says Governor Abbott is responsible for health and safety of Texas citizens

The U.S. Justice Department on Friday filed a lawsuit against Texas and its governor, Greg Abbott, over an order the Republican governor signed barring ground transportation of migrants who could be carrying COVID-19.  

In a complaint filed with the U.S. District Court for the Western District in El Paso, the Justice Department said Abbott’s order interferes with the federal government’s ability to deal with immigration.  

It followed Attorney General Merrick Garland's threat of legal action Thursday after the governor's order. Garland told Abbott to "immediately rescind" the executive order he called "both dangerous and unlawful." 

"The Order violates federal law in numerous respects, and Texas cannot lawfully enforce the Executive Order against any federal official or private parties working with the United States," Garland wrote in a letter to Abbott. 

The executive order issued Wednesday by Abbott restricted ground transportation of migrants "who pose a risk of carrying COVID-19 into Texas communities." 

Abbott argued his order was necessary to counter the rise in illegal immigration under the Biden administration. He has accused President Biden's border policies of being complicit in the spread of COVID-19. 

"The Biden administration is knowingly admitting hundreds of thousands of unauthorized migrants, many of whom the federal government knows full well have COVID-19," Abbott said in a response to Garland's lawsuit. 

"To be clear, the Biden administration is openly pondering looming shutdowns and mandates on U.S. citizens to control the spread of COVID-19, at the same time the Administration is knowingly worsening the problem by importing COVID-19 at extreme rates." 

Abbott issued the order a day after police in La Joya, Texas said that migrants in the country illegally, who may have tested positive for COVID-19, had been released from federal custody and placed in a local hotel by a charity, which left them free to wander off. Police learned of the situation when people at a nearby Whataburger complained about a group of sick-looking people not wearing masks as they coughed and sneezed inside the restaurant.

Meanwhile, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said the Lone Star state "won’t back down" and vowed to defend the governor’s order and "keep President Biden out of Texas’s business." 

The lawsuit escalates tensions between the Biden administration and Abbott over the governor's actions on the border, which have included jailing migrants on state crimes and building new barriers. 

The Border Patrol's Rio Grande Valley sector, the busiest corridor for illegal crossings, had more than 8,300 migrants in custody Wednesday, with an average processing time of 57 hours, said Brian Hastings, the sector chief. The sector has released more than 100,000 migrants since Oct. 1, including 9,000 in the last week.

The Homeland Security Department reported that 646 children traveling alone were taken into custody across the Mexico border on Thursday, compared with a daily average of 480 over the previous 30 days.

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This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital Solutions. Legal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

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The Last Days of Osama bin Laden

The Wall Street Journal 30 July, 2021 - 10:01am

But bin Laden’s bodyguards had become fed up with the risks that came with protecting and serving the world’s most wanted man. Bin Laden confided to one of his wives that the brothers were “getting exhausted” and planned to quit. Things got so bad that on January 15, he wrote a formal letter to them, despite the fact that they all lived together, acknowledging how angry they were with him and begging them to give him time to find new protectors and a new hideout (the compound was registered in the name of one of the brothers). He set down in writing that they had agreed to separate by mid-July.

Bin Laden never did find a new hiding place, however. He was killed, along with his son, Khalid, his two bodyguards and one of their wives, when U.S. Navy SEALs raided the compound on May 2, 2011. The operation not only rid the world of a terrorist mastermind; it recovered some 470,000 computer files from a trove of ten hard drives, five computers and around one hundred thumb drives and disks.

To understand the man who directed the attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, 2001, and set the course of American foreign policy for two decades to follow, there is no better resource than these documents—thousands of pages of his private letters and secret memos. Released in full only at the end of 2017, the files reside on the website of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Among them is a handwritten journal, kept by two of bin Laden’s daughters, that records the last few weeks of his life. Its script is difficult to decipher, so it has previously received scant attention from journalists and researchers. But together with the other Abbottabad documents, it helps to clear up some important mysteries about bin Laden and al Qaeda.

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