Perseid meteor shower 2021: Here’s when to watch the stunning show

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WJW FOX 8 News Cleveland 17 July, 2021 - 08:06am 76 views

When is the meteor shower 2021?

The best time to view the meteor shower will be in the hours between 2 a.m. and dawn. At its most active, the meteor shower could have more than 100 visible meteors per hour, reports Josie Fischels for NPR. SmithsonianHow to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower | Smart News

CHICAGO (NewsNation Now) – One of the year’s best meteor showers, the Perseid, has begun dazzling stargazers across the U.S.

At its peak, the shower provides 50-100 meteors an hour for sky watchers to see, according to NASA.

The Perseid meteor shower is a yearly event viewable in the months of July and August. The Perseids were first visible beginning July 14, but will last through August 24. The peak is expected around August 11-13.

Clear skies are key to viewing the meteor shower. It is visible in some places as early as 10 p.m., but the nightly peak is between 2 a.m. and sunrise.

The comet 109P/Swift-Turtle is responsible for the light show. The Perseid Meteor Shower is caused by the Earth traveling through debris and dust particles of the comet.

Those dust particles become the streaks of light visible in the sky when they collide with our atmosphere.

It’s called the Perseid meteor shower because the meteors appear to originate from the Perseus constellation — though this is not the source of the show.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

SOLON, Ohio (WJW) — Earlier this week, a thin blue line flag was removed from in front of the Solon Police Department. While another flag showing support of police officers is now flying in its place, a group of residents are rallying today in support of the original flag.

FOX 8 is taking the rally and march live in the video player above.

CLEVELAND (WJW) — The West Side Market has gone dark this Saturday.

Also, the continuation of the Black national anthem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” at flagship events. They say they’re adding in-stadium PSAs as well this year.

Read full article at WJW FOX 8 News Cleveland

Perseid meteor shower 2021: Here’s when to watch

WGHP FOX 8 Greensboro 17 July, 2021 - 09:22am

A Perseid meteor streaks across the sky above a camping site at the Negev desert near the city of Mitzpe Ramon in Israel on August 11, 2020, during the Perseids meteor shower. (Photo by Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images)

CHICAGO (NewsNation Now) – One of the year’s best meteor showers, the Perseid, has begun dazzling stargazers across the U.S.

At its peak, the shower provides 50-100 meteors an hour for sky watchers to see, according to NASA.

The Perseid meteor shower is a yearly event viewable in the months of July and August. The Perseids were first visible beginning July 14 but will last through August 24. The peak is expected around August 11-13.

Clear skies are key to viewing the meteor shower. It is visible in some places as early as 10 p.m., but the nightly peak is between 2 a.m. and sunrise.

The comet 109P/Swift-Turtle is responsible for the light show. The Perseid Meteor Shower is caused by the Earth traveling through debris and dust particles of the comet.

Those dust particles become the streaks of light visible in the sky when they collide with our atmosphere.

It’s called the Perseid meteor shower because the meteors appear to originate from the Perseus constellation — though this is not the source of the show.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Officers responded to a report of multiple injuries in the 300 block of SW 3rd Avenue just after 2 a.m. Upon their arrival officers found several victims with gunshot wounds and called in paramedics. At least one of the victims had life-threatening injuries, according to PPB.

On Thursday at around 12:23 p.m., the good Samaritan reported to police that a man — later identified as Jacobo Wright Mendoza — and a girl were standing outside of a car in the middle of a Glen Haven road, and the girl was yelling for help, according to police.

The $8,000, ten-week-old puppy was taken from the Furry Babies store inside the Yorktown Mall at approximately 3:45 p.m., while the store was fairly busy.

Perseids meteor shower: What time is the meteor shower tonight?

Daily Express 16 July, 2021 - 03:59pm

The Perseids meteor shower is back again this week, giving stargazers the perfect chance to crack out their deckchairs and enjoy the light show in the sky. But if you wanted to see the meteors over the next five weeks or so, you'll need to get up very early...

When a comet gets too close to the sun, it starts to heat up and break apart, forming numerous different fragments - known as meteors.

If the Earth crosses through the debris' path during its rotation of the sun, people on the surface will be able to see a meteor shower.

Every year, between July and August, the Earth crosses through the path of the Perseids, and they're back once again in 2021.

Anybody hoping to catch a glimpse of the meteor shower faces a very early start - or a late night.

The best time to see them is when it's completely dark outside; essentially the middle of the night.

In the UK, you'll most likely see the Perseids between midnight and 5.30am.

Thankfully though, you might also be able to see them just as the sun sets.

"For meteor showers, this usually occurs between midnight and the very early hours of the morning.

"The radiant of the Perseids is actually always above the horizon as seen from the UK, which means that observers in the UK should be able to see some meteors as soon as the Sun sets. Therefore, it is worth looking up in the early evening.

"It is always favourable to try and spot meteors when the Moon is below the horizon or when it is in its crescent phase, because otherwise it will act as a natural light pollution and will prevent the fainter meteors from being visible.

But, they're expected to peak between August 12 and 13, which is when you're more likely to see the most meteors.

If you're hoping to catch a glimpse of the meteor shower tonight, you're in luck.

All you'll need to do is simply look out of your window and into the night sky.

Try heading out to a quiet field or park, and give your eyes at least 15 minutes to become attuned to the dark.

There's always a high chance to see fireballs, which are essentially very bright meteors.

The smaller meteors, however, tend to vaporise on their descent, leaving behind a trail of light.

Delta Aquariids, Perseid Meteors In Tewksbury: Peak Dates

Patch.com 16 July, 2021 - 12:59pm

TEWKSBURY, MA — If you've been longing since spring for meteor showers, you're in luck as the rambling Delta Aquariid meteor shower got underway Monday. The peak isn't for a couple of weeks, but don't be surprised if you see a few shooting stars over Tewksbury before that.

Check the National Weather Service forecast for clear nights.

The Delta Aquariids reliably produce meteors for a couple of days on either side of the peak date and will continue to fire through about Aug. 23, intersecting with the Perseids, often regarded as the best meteor shower of the year — though the Geminid meteor shower in December is special in its own right.

The 2021 Delta Aquariids could be a disappointment, though. Harsh light from a waning gibbous moon will likely wash out a good number of the meteors, which are faint to begin with because the shower favors the Southern Hemisphere, according to Earthsky.org.

To see the Delta Aquariids, it's best to head outside between midnight and dawn, regardless of where you live.

That bright moon will wane in the first week of August. The Perseid meteor shower, which runs July 17-Aug. 24, will be well underway by that point, and viewing conditions should be ideal for the Aug. 11-12 peak.

So, is the shooting star a Delta Aquariid or a Perseid?

The alternate answer is that either way, a falling star is a beautiful thing to behold, but if you really want to distinguish a Delta Aquariid from a Perseid meteor, the short answer is that the former appear to fly from the south and the Perseids from the north-northeast.

NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke told Space.com that 2021 should be a stellar year for the Perseids, which are known for bright, persistent trains. If skies are clear, skywatchers will be able to see about 100 shooting stars an hour, Cooke said, though he explained that in more typical conditions, people should be able to see one meteor every minute.

"The Perseids are rich in fireballs, so they'll be bright," Cooke said.

Cooke, who leads the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, said meteor shower watching requires an investment in time and preparation. Some tips:

Also, Cooke told Space.com, ditch the cell phone.

"The bright screen can throw a wrench in your efforts to adjust your night vision," he said. "My suggestion to my friends who want to observe meteors is, leave your phone inside."

Perseid meteor shower 2021 active now: How to watch the stunning show

CNET 16 July, 2021 - 12:26pm

One of the best celestial displays in the solar system has kicked into gear with the annual Perseid meteor shower. We can thank large comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle for the little pieces of space debris that hit Earth's atmosphere and turn into the distinctive "shooting stars" of the meteor shower.

According to NASA, the Perseids will be active from now through Aug. 24, with the peak coming in mid-August. The space agency says it's "considered the best meteor shower of the year."

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The Perseids are popular for their reliability and the potential for spectacular fireballs. "The Perseids are one of the most plentiful showers (50 to 100 meteors seen per hour) and occur with warm summer nighttime weather, allowing sky watchers to easily view them," said NASA in a Perseids explainer geared for the Northern Hemisphere. 

Fireballs happen when larger pieces of comet debris strike the atmosphere, creating long, bright streaks, the kind that make you say "Whoa!" Ready to get excited? Check out these photos from last year's shower:

At its simplest, viewing the meteor shower is just about heading out at night and looking up, but there are some steps you can take to improve your chances at catching a good show. You're in luck if you're a super-early riser. The pre-dawn hours are a prime viewing time, but NASA also says you can see the meteors as early as 10 p.m. local time.

Some of the biggest obstacles to good meteor viewing are cloudy weather and light pollution. Aim for a clear night and try to get away from city lights. A hammock, blanket or a chair that leans back will save you from craning your neck. Give your eyes plenty of time to adjust to the darkness.

You can spot the meteors anywhere in the sky, though they get their name because they appear to be radiating from the constellation Perseus. To find Perseus, check out a stargazing app that will help you locate the constellation. Perseus isn't the actual source of the shower, but it can be helpful in tracking down the sometimes elusive streaks of light.    

You don't have to wait for the mid-August peak to enjoy the action. A dark spot on a clear night can deliver a worthwhile viewing experience throughout the Perseids' visit. Catch those shooting stars while you can.

Follow CNET's 2021 Space Calendar to stay up to date with all the latest space news this year. You can even add it to your own Google Calendar.      

Perseids Meteor Shower 2021: Watch Shooting Stars In Vernon

Patch.com 16 July, 2021 - 10:45am

VERNON, CT — Prepare to be dazzled. One of the year's most stunning skywatching shows is back to light up the night sky in Vernon and around the world.

Now through Aug. 24, stargazers can watch the Perseids meteor shower streak through the nighttime sky with its large explosions of light and color illuminating its path. According to NASA, the Perseids are considered the best meteor shower of the year, with up to 100 meteors seen per hour.

The best chance to see this "celestial fireworks" show in Vernon is generally during the wee hours before dawn, though NASA says at times it is possible to view a few of the meteors from this shower as early as 10 p.m. Meteor numbers increase after midnight, EarthSky.org reports.

While the Perseids are active now, the American Meteor Society says these fast and bright meteors will peak in Vernon the night of Aug. 11-13. To see the greatest number of shooting stars, look up at the dark sky starting around 2 a.m. EST in Vernon.

Along with good timing, location is also key. To get a good view of these fireballs soaring through the heavens, find a dark sky. If that's not possible, just know the number of visible meteors per hour drops to about 30 or 40 in the suburbs, and those in downtown city centers will see almost nothing at all.

Here are some tips to get the most out of your nighttime meteor-watching excursion, courtesy of the Old Farmer's Almanac:

If the weather, a bright moon, or your location in Vernon prevents you from seeing the Perseids meteor shower, don't worry! NASA has you covered. A live broadcast of the meteor shower from a camera at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama will be available on the NASA Meteor Watch Facebook starting around 8 p.m. CDT on Aug. 11 and continuing until sunrise on Aug. 12.

Fireballs light up sky: Perseid meteor shower visible in Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky

WLWT Cincinnati 16 July, 2021 - 06:24am

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One of the year's most spectacular light shows is back, lighting up our skies through August.

The celestial event will begin this week, and is expected to peak in mid-August.

It's considered "the best meteor shower of the year," according to NASA.

Each year, Earth passes by debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle, which burns up in our atmosphere, appearing as shooting stars. The Perseids get their name from the constellation Perseus—they appear to originate from that spot in the northern sky, AMS reports.

With very fast and bright meteors, Perseids frequently leave long "wakes" of light and color behind them as they streak through Earth's atmosphere.

The Perseid meteor shower began on Wednesday, and will remain active through Aug. 24, according to NASA.

Look to the northern sky between midnight and dawn and you may get lucky enough to catch one of the meteors flying by. This will be possible for only the next few nights, so don't wait too long.

For the best viewing, it's advised to go to a darker sky to avoid light pollution from the city lights.

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How To Watch The Best Meteor Shower Of The Year

Screen Rant 15 July, 2021 - 06:00pm

Meteor showers are a regular, and stunning, occurrence on Earth. There are about 30 distinct showers that happen each year, with each one featuring unique characteristics that set it apart from the others. The Quadrantids shower in January, for example, has a peak viewing of just a few hours and is known for lighting up the sky with bright fireballs. By comparison, the Lydris shower in April is iconic for its sheer unpredictability —  showcasing anywhere between 20 and 100 meteors per hour.

In the case of the Perseids, NASA says it's "the best meteor shower of the year" — filling the sky with up to 100 meteors every hour! Peak viewing occurs in mid-August, though the showers are active anytime between July 14 and August 24. Perseids consists of fast, bright meteors that leave long strands of light/color in the night sky. Along with smaller meteor streaks, Perseids is also home to fireball sightings. As NASA describes, "Fireballs are larger explosions of light and color ...this is due to the fact that fireballs originate from larger particles of cometary material." The best part is that Perseids are easily seen from virtually anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere. So long as someone is above the equator, catching a glimpse of Perseids should be relatively easy.

Outside of that, all general meteor shower viewing tips apply with Perseids. Rather than heading outside right when the shower is expected to be visible, try going out around 20-30 minutes ahead of time. This should allow someone's eyes to properly adjust to the darkness of the night, ensuring they can see the shower as clearly as possible. It's also a good idea to view Perseids from an area with minimal light pollution. Get far away from the city, find a cozy spot in the country, and that'll allow the meteor shower to shine without any disturbance from surrounding light sources. Keep these tips in mind, be safe, and enjoy the Perseids show!

Source: NASA

'Fireballs' light up the sky: How to watch the Perseid meteor shower

USA TODAY 14 July, 2021 - 01:53pm

It's time to catch the meteor shower that will last for over the next month. Here's everything to know about the Perseid meteor shower.

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The peak of the best summertime meteor shower, the Perseids, will be coming to a sky near you. USA TODAY

Gaze upon the night sky as the best meteor shower of the year makes its annual return. 

It has been an incredible year to witness some of the solar system's visually stunning phenomena, from the super flower blood moon in May, the ring of fire solar eclipse in early June and the strawberry supermoon late last month. Now, it's time for the annual meteor shower NASA has called the best of the year.

The Perseid shower began Wednesday and will continue through Aug. 24, with the peak coming in mid-August. This year, that peak will be Aug. 11-13.

Discovered in 1862 by Lewis Swift and Horace Tuttle, the shower originates from Earth entering the orbit of debris from the comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, which takes 133 years to orbit the sun. 

What makes the event so stunning is the shower's bright, long streaks of light and dazzling "fireballs," which are large bursts that last longer than typical meteors, according to NASA.

Luckily for people in the United States, the shower is more visible in the Northern Hemisphere. But, it does require staying up late, and a clear view of the sky.

The showers are best seen around 2 a.m. local time but can be visible as early as 9 p.m. It can be seen until just before dawn.

If staying up late every night for the chance to see the shower isn't ideal, it may be best to wait for the peak. From Aug. 11 to 13, up to 100 meteors an hour can be seen in the night sky.

Last year, the moon's light made it harder for people to catch a glimpse of the showers. This year will be better, because the moon is in its the waxing crescent phase and will be in it again during the peak period, meaning it won't have much light to compete with the meteors. 

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