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Destructoid 29 June, 2021 - 01:10pm 26 views

What are the PS Plus games for July 2021?

A list of PlayStation Plus games for July 2021 have leaked online and they are Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, WRC 9 and A Plague Tale: Innocence. Screen RantPS Plus July 2021 Game Leak Names Uncharted: The Lost Legacy & Two Others

Failure was the catalyst for its biggest innovations. When Sony realized that big publishers and even its own studios had turned their back on Vita - citing disappointing sales - it fell upon Ahmad and fellow team members to find a strategy that would elevate Vita to cult status, and make a mark on the industry forever. 

It's been more than two years since the last Vita was produced, and it's been six years since Sony ceased developing Vita games. But it still has a legion of dedicated fans.

Industry sources confirmed that the negative fan response took Sony by surprise. It was no easy decision to keep the stores open despite the outcry. The sources estimate that the storefronts probably cost a few hundred thousand dollars a year to run. It's not much money for a huge corporation like Sony - PlayStation turned a $3.1 billion profit in the company's most recent financial year - but it's not nothing. 

The people still working directly on Vita at Sony always understood that there would be a big backlash, according to sources. Some of those who suspected it might be an issue warned senior management prior to the closure, but were reportedly ignored. 

As those who waved away the warnings quickly learned, Vita fandom is still a force to be reckoned with. Partly, this passion is Sony's own doing. Although the Vita was a commercial disappointment for Sony - and the company definitely made a lot of mistakes throughout its lifetime - it remains a beautifully designed machine. A lack of big first party, and triple-A games hampered the Vita, but the company's attempts to bring cool, smaller games to the handheld were nothing short of heroic, and certainly lengthened the life of the Vita. 

All of these lessons were watched and learned by Sony's great gaming rival Nintendo, so when that company launched the Nintendo Switch in 2017, it took the Vita team's indie playbook, and created a diverse library of games as a core of the platform. Vita may be Sony's greatest failure in gaming, but it's created an aura and a legacy that's impressive in its own right. 

"I'm okay with it not necessarily selling a huge amount on the platform. It'll go to the Vita super fans. That community is pretty fantastic and that's important to me, as well as having a version of the game on my Vita that I can play."

He too is relieved that the Vita store is staying open, citing game preservation as an important issue, and argues that it has a great deal of nostalgic relevance.

"I also think there's the argument for keeping the diehard fan base happy," he says. "The Vita diehard fan base is still there, and they are still playing. Sony has changed since Vita launched, they don't have these big personalities up front, who would make us feel like the company isn't some faceless monolith. Vita is this time capsule to an idea of PlayStation that doesn't exist anymore, but people still feel attached to."

That attachment continues to draw developers to the platform. Lillymo Games released retro space shooter Habroxia 2 in February. "We knew we wanted to support the system as long as we were able to. The player base on PS Vita has never been very large, but there is a dedicated group of people who still support the console to this day,” developer Barry Johnson says.

"We have sold thousands of copies of each of our last three games on physical Vita limited releases. Trophy tracking websites tell us that thousands more players have played the games on Vita digitally as well. For a small team like us those thousands of additional sales of each game make a big difference."

Johnson says he's working with Sony with a view to releasing another title for Vita, a non-violent arcade game called Forest Guardian. 

To understand why Vita attracted such a die-hard fan base - without AAA support - let's go back and look at the history.

Sony launched the PlayStation Vita in Japan in December 2011, and a debut in the U.S, and Europe a few months later, with launch titles including Uncharted: Golden Abyss, Rayman Origins and ModNation Racers: Road Trip. 

Then Sony employee and Vita enthusiast Shahid Ahmad decided something ought to be done. He had a very specific vision for Vita. 

"I wanted to turn it into a portable Steam machine," he says. 

At the time of Vita's development and launch, Ahmad was working as a special projects manager for PlayStation, drumming up developer support in India. Although his efforts were successful, he knew he was operating at the margins. "Special projects usually means your next step is going to be out the door, because you're working on a bunch of things that nobody cares about."

In an attempt to boost developer interest in all PlayStation mobile gaming platforms, which now included Vita, Ahmad visited the Game Developer Conference in 2012. He started hanging out with indie developers, many of whom were enjoying success on Steam. 

"I was shocked to find out that there were devs who didn't know what a Vita was," he recalls. He found that developers did not trust console manufacturers, did not want to work inside their closed systems and rigorous procedures. They were thriving on Steam. "They just weren't interested in us, or in anything we were doing."

That sentiment struck Ahmad, but he also saw an opportunity.

"I went back to the office and I was in a big meeting with a lot of execs there. And I said, we are losing the next generation, this machine is going to die. We have to do open heart surgery now."

He showed them a chart listing the games due out for Vita in 2013. There were just 13 games on the list. He pitched them his idea: to invest in indies, and to spend hard cash on persuading them to make games for Vita, or to port their best games. 

He told them that stringent approval policies needed to be relaxed. This was bigger than the success or failure of Vita, he argued; their efforts now would affect the future of PlayStation as a whole. "It's not just about [finanical] return, it's also about securing the next generation of developers," he told them.

By the time he was done with his first round of pitches to indies, he had signed 55 more games to Vita. It didn't save the handheld from commercial failure - at that point, nothing could - but it gave people a reason to keep playing, and it bound the PlayStation identity closer to indies than ever before. 

Ahmad, alongside fellow developer relations executive Adam Boyes, went out on the road, persuading developers to work on Vita games, connecting devs with second-party companies with technical Vita experience, and picking up the tab. 

"We worked like crazy,' he says. "By GDC 2013, everyone knew about us. Everyone knew that we were trying to get independent developers on board and that PlayStation is now a much more friendly place for developers. The whole thing just built up an awful lot of steam. If you'll pardon the expression."

Despite the fact that it was no longer profitable, the Vita enjoyed a ‘golden age’ of sorts during 2013-2014. In those years, games released on the Vita included The Binding of Isaac, Don't Starve, Guacamelee, Hotline Miami, Fez, Limbo, Luftrausers, OlliOlli, Nidhogg, Rogue Legacy, Spelunky, and The Unfinished Swan. Many of these games were not available on any other mobile platform. 

Of course, console manufacturers worked with indies before, such as with Microsoft's Xbox Live Arcade. But the rapidity and fruitfulness of the Vita effort was unprecedented.  

"The terms we offered at the time set the standard that the industry has since followed,” Ahmad said. “They were the most developer-friendly terms anybody had seen. It certainly made it easier for us to get games for PS4 during the launch period. "

Developers I spoke to said they felt, at the time, that they were dealing with something new, and the money Sony was offering - a guaranteed advance on royalties - earned their trust and commitment. 

Some give Vita credit for their subsequent success. Mike Bithell recalls the Vita release of Thomas Was Alone (2013) as pivotal in his career. "It legitimized the game," he says. "For me, that was a way into consoles that wasn't available anywhere else. There was an enormous number of indie projects that were getting visibility on Vita, and punching way above our weight in terms of store presence."

Cellar Door Games released Rogue Legacy for Vita in 2013, following an approach from Sony. Designer Teddy Lee recalls that "Sony was awesome to work with," adding "Shahid was super, super cool. And we did pretty well when the game came out, so I ended up making three games for Vita. 

"Shahid saw that it was a great handheld, especially for playing pixel games. That should have been Sony's approach from the beginning, instead of trying to get triple-A games. It was such a fun handheld and it's cool that people are still making games and people are buying them."

Drinkbox was also a keen supporter of Vita, releasing Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack at launch. Graham Smith, co-founder and producer, says the team were encouraged to make use of Vita's particular features, including the backpad, tilt, and touchscreen. 

"We made the game really feel like it was at home on Vita. It was great to be there at launch. We got a lot of sales, there weren't that many games available. And people really checked us out because of being on Vita,” Smith said.

Guacamelee was released in 2013 and proved to be another success. In fact, DrinkBox says it still received modest royalty checks for its Vita games. 

Poppy Works is a development studio that's also published a string of games on Vita, including Factotum 90, Halloween Forevert, and Super Skull Smash GO! 2 Turbo. Company head Wolfgang Wozniak praised Sony’s approach to indies during the handheld’s more prominent years.

"Sony had their asses kicked by Microsoft for digital download stuff in the 360 era. So they were being aggressive with pursuing new development partnerships,” Wozniak said. 

"Things have changed a lot since then, but with Vita they did everything right. Even the dev kit is really great. Before this, dev kits were these huge bulky things and you needed a physics degree to even operate one. The Vita dev kit is fantastic. It's basically a Vita with extra ports. 

"So it was cheaper for us to develop on Vita, and Sony hired all these people who were always helpful. These people knew their shit. They knew what was cool and they knew how to work with developers."

While individual developers saw success during the system’s life, there's no doubt that the PlayStation Vita was a failure for Sony. Sony was frightened that the handheld might cannibalize sales of its PS3 and PS4 consoles, and so the machine shipped without an HDMI port, to connect easily with TV sets. The company failed to meaningfully invest in first-party development, leaving their studios with the too-easy option of focusing on console development, at the expense of handheld. 

Innovations like cross-play were handled poorly, with mixed messaging and fluffed launches.The 2014 cross-play launch of Rogue Legacy on PlayStation Plus crashed Sony's servers, according to Teddy Lee. In the end, the game's cross-play capabilities were deleted. 

But for a few short years, the company created a template for console manufacturers who want to attract indie talent to their platforms. Major beneficiaries of this are Nintendo and Microsoft, both of which have been hugely successful in recent years in attracting indie games to Switch and Xbox. 

Nintendo's recent and specific branding of "Nindies Showcases" shows how much the company now values independent games. Microsoft notably takes great care to showcase independent games on Xbox Game Pass, giving them breathing room - and revenues - alongside more lavish productions from large studios and publishers. 

"It's maybe too soon to clearly see Vita's legacy," says Ahmad. "But I think that we learned that openness is better than being closed. That communication is better than silence. That having a more level playing field is good for innovation. That inspiring creativity is good for the advancement of the industry, which is good for the health of gaming.

"I have it on good authority that the other console companies just took our playbook. And my response is, well, that's fantastic. That's all I ever wanted. We were too closed off, and then we opened up and good things started to happen. Clearly, the approach that we took was a net positive for business, because if it wasn't, other corporations wouldn't do similar or exactly the same thing."

Colin Campbelll has been writing about games for three decades. Check out his daily newsletter How Games Are Changing The World.

Read full article at Destructoid

PlayStation's First State of Play - What Happened To The Games?

Cultured Vultures 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

All PlayStation State of Play July 2021 Rumors | Game Rant

GameRant 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

The last PlayStation State of Play was in February 2021. This showcase primarily focused on already-announced titles, but it featured the announcement of Sifu and Final Fantasy 7 Remake Intergrade. A portion of fans considered the last State of Play event to be somewhat disappointing, despite the fresh looks at games like Returnal and Oddworld: Soulstorm. The State of Play exhibition that's rumored for July could be a huge deal for PlayStation fans. While all rumors should be taken with a grain of salt, it might be difficult for PlayStation gamers not to be excited about what could take place in July.

The last news on God of War: Ragnarok came just a few weeks ago when it was officially delayed in 2022. With this in mind, it could seem unlikely to some God of War fans that it'll have its gameplay revealed so soon after the delay. While this is effectively an unverified rumor connected to another unverified rumor, God of War fans are still excited to see if the gameplay will be revealed on July 8.

The big surprise at the event could be related to one of these games, and there have been rumors of everything from a new Uncharted game, a Bloodborne successor, and even a remake of The Last of Us. Almost half of the new PS5 games are said to be new IPs, which could mean there is an equal chance of seeing something fresh as much as a familiar franchise.

If the rumors prove to be true, it could be an exciting State of Play on July 8 for gamers. Sony hasn't made an official statement on the next State of Play yet, so the rumors shouldn't be taken as confirmation. With Ghost of Ikishima, God of War: Ragnarok , and Death Stranding: Director's Cut allegedly set for appearances, it could be the most memorable State of Play event in some time. Hopefully, for PlayStation gamers, these rumors turn out to be accurate come July 8.

The PlayStation Vita's Legacy Is More Important Than Its Sales Numbers - IGN

IGN 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

Failure was the catalyst for its biggest innovations. When Sony realized that big publishers and even its own studios had turned their back on Vita - citing disappointing sales - it fell upon Ahmad and fellow team members to find a strategy that would elevate Vita to cult status, and make a mark on the industry forever.

It's been more than two years since the last Vita was produced, and it's been six years since Sony ceased developing Vita games. But it still has a legion of dedicated fans.

Industry sources confirmed that the negative fan response took Sony by surprise. It was no easy decision to keep the stores open despite the outcry. The sources estimate that the storefronts probably cost a few hundred thousand dollars a year to run. It's not much money for a huge corporation like Sony - PlayStation turned a $3.1 billion profit in the company's most recent financial year - but it's not nothing.

The people still working directly on Vita at Sony always understood that there would be a big backlash, according to sources. Some of those who suspected it might be an issue warned senior management prior to the closure, but were reportedly ignored.

As those who waved away the warnings quickly learned, Vita fandom is still a force to be reckoned with. Partly, this passion is Sony's own doing. Although the Vita was a commercial disappointment for Sony - and the company definitely made a lot of mistakes throughout its lifetime - it remains a beautifully designed machine. A lack of big first party, and triple-A games hampered the Vita, but the company's attempts to bring cool, smaller games to the handheld were nothing short of heroic, and certainly lengthened the life of the Vita.

All of these lessons were watched and learned by Sony's great gaming rival Nintendo, so when that company launched the Nintendo Switch in 2017, it took the Vita team's indie playbook, and created a diverse library of games as a core of the platform. Vita may be Sony's greatest failure in gaming, but it's created an aura and a legacy that's impressive in its own right.

"I'm okay with it not necessarily selling a huge amount on the platform. It'll go to the Vita super fans. That community is pretty fantastic and that's important to me, as well as having a version of the game on my Vita that I can play."

He too is relieved that the Vita store is staying open, citing game preservation as an important issue, and argues that it has a great deal of nostalgic relevance.

"I also think there's the argument for keeping the diehard fan base happy," he says. "The Vita diehard fan base is still there, and they are still playing. Sony has changed since Vita launched, they don't have these big personalities up front, who would make us feel like the company isn't some faceless monolith. Vita is this time capsule to an idea of PlayStation that doesn't exist anymore, but people still feel attached to."

That attachment continues to draw developers to the platform. Lillymo Games released retro space shooter Habroxia 2 in February. "We knew we wanted to support the system as long as we were able to. The player base on PS Vita has never been very large, but there is a dedicated group of people who still support the console to this day,” developer Barry Johnson says.

"We have sold thousands of copies of each of our last three games on physical Vita limited releases. Trophy tracking websites tell us that thousands more players have played the games on Vita digitally as well. For a small team like us those thousands of additional sales of each game make a big difference."

Johnson says he's working with Sony with a view to releasing another title for Vita, a non-violent arcade game called Forest Guardian.

To understand why Vita attracted such a die-hard fan base - without AAA support - let's go back and look at the history.

Sony launched the PlayStation Vita in Japan in December 2011, and a debut in the U.S, and Europe a few months later, with launch titles including Uncharted: Golden Abyss, Rayman Origins and ModNation Racers: Road Trip.

Then Sony employee and Vita enthusiast Shahid Ahmad decided something ought to be done. He had a very specific vision for Vita.

"I wanted to turn it into a portable Steam machine," he says.

At the time of Vita's development and launch, Ahmad was working as a special projects manager for PlayStation, drumming up developer support in India. Although his efforts were successful, he knew he was operating at the margins. "Special projects usually means your next step is going to be out the door, because you're working on a bunch of things that nobody cares about."

In an attempt to boost developer interest in all PlayStation mobile gaming platforms, which now included Vita, Ahmad visited the Game Developer Conference in 2012. He started hanging out with indie developers, many of whom were enjoying success on Steam.

"I was shocked to find out that there were devs who didn't know what a Vita was," he recalls. He found that developers did not trust console manufacturers, did not want to work inside their closed systems and rigorous procedures. They were thriving on Steam. "They just weren't interested in us, or in anything we were doing."

That sentiment struck Ahmad, but he also saw an opportunity.

"I went back to the office and I was in a big meeting with a lot of execs there. And I said, we are losing the next generation, this machine is going to die. We have to do open heart surgery now."

He showed them a chart listing the games due out for Vita in 2013. There were just 13 games on the list. He pitched them his idea: to invest in indies, and to spend hard cash on persuading them to make games for Vita, or to port their best games.

He told them that stringent approval policies needed to be relaxed. This was bigger than the success or failure of Vita, he argued; their efforts now would affect the future of PlayStation as a whole. "It's not just about [finanical] return, it's also about securing the next generation of developers," he told them.

By the time he was done with his first round of pitches to indies, he had signed 55 more games to Vita. It didn't save the handheld from commercial failure - at that point, nothing could - but it gave people a reason to keep playing, and it bound the PlayStation identity closer to indies than ever before.

Ahmad, alongside fellow developer relations executive Adam Boyes, went out on the road, persuading developers to work on Vita games, connecting devs with second-party companies with technical Vita experience, and picking up the tab.

"We worked like crazy,' he says. "By GDC 2013, everyone knew about us. Everyone knew that we were trying to get independent developers on board and that PlayStation is now a much more friendly place for developers. The whole thing just built up an awful lot of steam. If you'll pardon the expression."

Of course, console manufacturers worked with indies before, such as with Microsoft's Xbox Live Arcade. But the rapidity and fruitfulness of the Vita effort was unprecedented.

"The terms we offered at the time set the standard that the industry has since followed,” Ahmad said. “They were the most developer-friendly terms anybody had seen. It certainly made it easier for us to get games for PS4 during the launch period. "

Developers I spoke to said they felt, at the time, that they were dealing with something new, and the money Sony was offering - a guaranteed advance on royalties - earned their trust and commitment.

Some give Vita credit for their subsequent success. Mike Bithell recalls the Vita release of Thomas Was Alone (2013) as pivotal in his career. "It legitimized the game," he says. "For me, that was a way into consoles that wasn't available anywhere else. There was an enormous number of indie projects that were getting visibility on Vita, and punching way above our weight in terms of store presence."

Cellar Door Games released Rogue Legacy for Vita in 2013, following an approach from Sony. Designer Teddy Lee recalls that "Sony was awesome to work with," adding "Shahid was super, super cool. And we did pretty well when the game came out, so I ended up making three games for Vita.

"Shahid saw that it was a great handheld, especially for playing pixel games. That should have been Sony's approach from the beginning, instead of trying to get triple-A games. It was such a fun handheld and it's cool that people are still making games and people are buying them."

Drinkbox was also a keen supporter of Vita, releasing Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack at launch. Graham Smith, co-founder and producer, says the team were encouraged to make use of Vita's particular features, including the backpad, tilt, and touchscreen.

"We made the game really feel like it was at home on Vita. It was great to be there at launch. We got a lot of sales, there weren't that many games available. And people really checked us out because of being on Vita,” Smith said.

Guacamelee was released in 2013 and proved to be another success. In fact, DrinkBox says it still received modest royalty checks for its Vita games.

Poppy Works is a development studio that's also published a string of games on Vita, including Factotum 90, Halloween Forevert, and Super Skull Smash GO! 2 Turbo. Company head Wolfgang Wozniak praised Sony’s approach to indies during the handheld’s more prominent years.

"Sony had their asses kicked by Microsoft for digital download stuff in the 360 era. So they were being aggressive with pursuing new development partnerships,” Wozniak said.

"Things have changed a lot since then, but with Vita they did everything right. Even the dev kit is really great. Before this, dev kits were these huge bulky things and you needed a physics degree to even operate one. The Vita dev kit is fantastic. It's basically a Vita with extra ports.

"So it was cheaper for us to develop on Vita, and Sony hired all these people who were always helpful. These people knew their shit. They knew what was cool and they knew how to work with developers."

While individual developers saw success during the system’s life, there's no doubt that the PlayStation Vita was a failure for Sony. Sony was frightened that the handheld might cannibalize sales of its PS3 and PS4 consoles, and so the machine shipped without an HDMI port, to connect easily with TV sets. The company failed to meaningfully invest in first-party development, leaving their studios with the too-easy option of focusing on console development, at the expense of handheld.

Innovations like cross-play were handled poorly, with mixed messaging and fluffed launches.The 2014 cross-play launch of Rogue Legacy on PlayStation Plus crashed Sony's servers, according to Teddy Lee. In the end, the game's cross-play capabilities were deleted.

But for a few short years, the company created a template for console manufacturers who want to attract indie talent to their platforms. Major beneficiaries of this are Nintendo and Microsoft, both of which have been hugely successful in recent years in attracting indie games to Switch and Xbox.

Nintendo's recent and specific branding of "Nindies Showcases" shows how much the company now values independent games. Microsoft notably takes great care to showcase independent games on Xbox Game Pass, giving them breathing room - and revenues - alongside more lavish productions from large studios and publishers.

"It's maybe too soon to clearly see Vita's legacy," says Ahmad. "But I think that we learned that openness is better than being closed. That communication is better than silence. That having a more level playing field is good for innovation. That inspiring creativity is good for the advancement of the industry, which is good for the health of gaming.

"I have it on good authority that the other console companies just took our playbook. And my response is, well, that's fantastic. That's all I ever wanted. We were too closed off, and then we opened up and good things started to happen. Clearly, the approach that we took was a net positive for business, because if it wasn't, other corporations wouldn't do similar or exactly the same thing."

Colin Campbelll has been writing about games for three decades. Check out his daily newsletter How Games Are Changing The World.

PS Plus July 2021 FREE PS4, PS5 games reveal time, leaks, predictions, PlayStation DEALS

Express 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

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UPDATE: The PS Plus free games have been revealed for July 2021.

The PlayStation Plus games include A Plague Tale Innocence for PS5, as well as Call of Duty Black Ops 3 and WWE 2K Battlegrounds for PS4.

The free PlayStation Plus games will be available to download from July 6.

ORIGINAL: Sony is about to announce the July 2021 PlayStation Plus games for PS5 and PS4.

It's been a bumper year for PlayStation Plus free games, which have included titles like Final Fantasy 7 Remake, Destruction All-Stars, Control: Ultimate Edition and Days Gone.

The current line-up for June is equally as strong, featuring Star Wars Squadrons, Virtua Fighter 5 and Operation Tango.

Fingers crossed the next batch of free PS Plus games - which will be revealed at 4.30pm BST on June 30 - will be just as strong. The games will be available to download less than a week later on July 6.

While the full line-up will be officially revealed on June 30, one of the games may have leaked early.

According to recent reports, the next-gen version of A Plague Tale: Innocence will be the free PS5 game for July 2021.

The PS5 upgrade is pencilled in for a July 6 launch, which has led to speculation that it will be join the PlayStation Plus line-up.

The PlayStation 5 version will feature 4K visuals, 60 frames-per-second gameplay, as well as 3D audio and presumably some DualSense features.

"Hunted by Inquisition soldiers and surrounded by unstoppable swarms of rats, Amicia and Hugo will come to know and trust each other. As they struggle to survive against overwhelming odds, they will fight to find purpose in this brutal, unforgiving world."

Without any leaks on the PS4 side of things, fans have been filling in the blanks by predicting the line-up.

Among the most popular predictions are Uncharted Lost Legacy and Predator Hunting Grounds.

Uncharted is one of the few PlayStation exclusives yet to feature on PS Plus, while Predator Hunting Grounds is the kind of multiplayer release that tends to feature.

Other popular choices include PlayStation exclusives like Gravity Rush 2, Death Stranding and Gran Turismo Sport.

Indie favourites like Untitled Goose Game and Firewatch get a few votes, as well as The Forest, Celeste and Visage.

If you want to grab the June and July free PS4 and PS5 games, then it's worth heading over to ShopTo for cheap PlayStation Plus subscriptions.

The UK retailer is currently selling 12-month PlayStation Plus subscriptions for just £39.85, compared to £49.99 on PSN.

As a digital membership, the PS Plus subscription will be delivered immediately, which means you can use it to bag the latest batch of free PlayStation Plus games.

When Sony's Next PlayStation Showcase Is | Screen Rant

Screen Rant 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

Sony has been using the PlayStation Showcase format since 2019, with each State of Play highlighting updates for the biggest upcoming PlayStation titles. Previous State of Play events revealed the release date for The Last of Us Part 2, as well as releasing new gameplay for Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart and Ghost of Tsushima. The most recent State of Play took place at the end of May, with a segment fully dedicated to brand new gameplay for Horizon Forbidden West.

It is important to note that Sony has not revealed any official date for the upcoming State of Play as of yet, so the rumors that have been circulating online concerning any potential event are not incredibly reliable. Sony could have a completely different date in mind for the State of Play, or a large-scale event might not be in the works at all. However, with Sony's absence from E3 and limited involvement in Summer Game Fest, it stands to reason that there may be something in the works.

The July date makes sense, as Sony typically presents a State of Play showcase during the summer months. Taking things one step further is the prediction of a Thursday presentation, which is the standard day of the week that Sony usually holds their presentations. State of Play events also tend to occur every couple of months, and with the last event being in May, a July presentation date fulfills this trend.

However, it remains to be seen whether Sony will confirm this specific date as the official State of Play date or wait for sometime later in the year. Whenever the showcase does take place, players can most likely expect updates on upcoming titles for PS5 and PS4, like the recently delayed God of War Ragnarok and the Death Stranding: Director's Cut that was announced at Summer Game Fest. Sony might even have new games to announce, but PlayStation fans will have wait until the State of Play event (hopefully) happens in the coming weeks.

Source: QuimStix

Sony State of Play event summer 2021: HUGE PS5 gameplay reveal to take centre stage

Express 30 June, 2021 - 11:34am

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they'll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Sony is reportedly getting ready to hold a big State of Play event for the summer.

The next State of Play event is rumoured to take place in the coming weeks, and will focus on upcoming PS4 and PS5 games.

Fans can expect plenty of new game reveals, as well as updates on previously announced releases.

And if the latest reports are to be believed, this will include a first look at PlayStation exclusive God of War Ragnarok.

That's according to respected leaker @Shpeshal_Nick, whose track record with Sony leaks is not to be scoffed at.

"I’m being told we’ll see our first gameplay of the new God of War at Sony’s show too. Will be exciting to see," he tweets.

As a reminder, God of War Ragnarok was announced during last year's PS5 release date event.

God of War Ragnarok was initially expected to launch in 2021, but was later pushed back until 2022.

Without delving into spoiler territory, plans for a sequel were teased at the end of Kratos and Atreus's adventure in God of War.

The game is free for PS Plus subscribers, as part of the PlayStation Plus Collection on PS5.

If you haven't already, God of War is well worth checking out, if only to witness the new gameplay style and unique story.

"Together with his son Atreus, the pair will venture into the brutal realm of Midgard and fight to fulfil a deeply personal quest.

The game features various creatures and characters from Norse mythology, including Baldur, Modi and Magni.

The sequel is expected to introduce even more characters, including some of the more iconic beings from Norse mythology.

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