Polls close in California Gov. Newsom recall election, results begin to be tallied

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NBC News 14 September, 2021 - 10:00pm 31 views

What is a governor recall?

The recall has been part of California's political system since 1911. It provides a mechanism for the public to attempt to remove elected public officials from office before the end of their term of office. ca.govCalifornia Gubernatorial Recall Election - Frequently Asked Questions :: California Secretary of State

BREAKING: California Gov. Gavin Newsom staves off recall effort, NBC News projects

Newsom, a Democrat, faced serious headwinds and multiple crises as polls over the summer showed him in real jeopardy. But Newsom, with the help of party leaders like President Joe Biden, succeeded in rousing Democratic voters with a message that warned a Republican replacement would roll back Covid protections and betray the state's progressive character.

The recall election asked voters whether Newsom should be removed — "yes" or "no" — and gave voters who wanted to him ousted the choice of 46 alternatives.

Newsom thanked California voters for keeping him in office.

"We said yes to science. We said yes to vaccines," Newsom said in brief remarks at a news conference. "We said yes to ending his pandemic. We said yes to people's right to vote without fear. We said yes to women’s constitutional right to decide."

Newsom and national Democrats took no chances, pouring millions of dollars into what should have been a cakewalk, with memories fresh from the last recall in 2003, when California voters terminated Democratic Gov. Gray Davis and replaced him with Republican movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Newsom from the beginning sought to portray the recall as a right-wing power grab, but struggled to get Democratic voters to pay attention until the entrance of controversial conservative radio host Larry Elder, who jumped into the race late and immediately shot to the top of the polls of replacement candidates.

Registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans in California nearly 2 to 1, so the only way the recall could succeed was if Democrats didn't bother voting or got behind the effort to remove Newsom. In the end, the state's liberals showed up in droves to back the Democrat and keep California out of the hands of someone like Elder.

National Democrats hope the race can be a model for next year's midterm elections, since Democrats have typically had a hard time motivating their voters in nonpresidential races.

Frustration with Covid-19 restrictions helped recall organizers gather the roughly 1.5 million signatures they needed to force the vote. But Newsom ended up making his support for mask and vaccine mandates the closing argument of his campaign, warning that a Republican replacement would undo his health restrictions if elected.

An NBC News exit poll found voters sided with Newsom on the public health measures, with a plurality, or 45 percent, saying Newsom’s Covid policies are about right, compared to 32 percent who said the measures are too strict. Another 18 percent said they aren’t strict enough.

The NBC News exit poll results of early and Election Day voters found 70 percent support Newsom’s mandate requiring students to wear masks in schools and 63 percent said getting vaccinated against the coronavirus is more a “public health responsibility” than a “personal choice."

The governor has been weighed down by a slew of issues facing the state, but those voting for and against recalling him had different views of which issues were most important, according to NBC News exit poll.

Among voters who wanted Newsom removed, the economy was the top issue for 27 percent of them, followed by homelessness, which was the top issue for 23 percent of those in favor of recall. Crime was the top issue for 17 percent, and the Covid pandemic for 15 percent, according to the exit poll.

The pandemic was the top issue for 42 percent of those who wanted to keep Newsom in office. That was followed by homelessness, cited by 22 percent; wildfires, 18 percent; the economy, 9 percent; and crime, 2 percent.

As polls showed Newsom likely to survive the recall, Republicans began to sow baseless seeds of doubt about the integrity of the vote, with former President Donald Trump calling it "rigged" and Elder's campaign promoting a website that claimed it had found fraud in the results before any were even released.

Read full article at NBC News

Newsom cruises to victory in recall election, will stay in office, NBC News projects

NBC News 14 September, 2021 - 11:01pm

BREAKING: California Gov. Gavin Newsom staves off recall effort, NBC News projects

Newsom, a Democrat, faced serious headwinds and multiple crises as polls over the summer showed him in real jeopardy. But Newsom, with the help of party leaders like President Joe Biden, succeeded in rousing Democratic voters with a message that warned a Republican replacement would roll back Covid protections and betray the state's progressive character.

The recall election asked voters whether Newsom should be removed — "yes" or "no" — and gave voters who wanted to him ousted the choice of 46 alternatives.

Newsom thanked California voters for keeping him in office.

"We said yes to science. We said yes to vaccines," Newsom said in brief remarks at a news conference. "We said yes to ending his pandemic. We said yes to people's right to vote without fear. We said yes to women’s constitutional right to decide."

Newsom and national Democrats took no chances, pouring millions of dollars into what should have been a cakewalk, with memories fresh from the last recall in 2003, when California voters terminated Democratic Gov. Gray Davis and replaced him with Republican movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Newsom from the beginning sought to portray the recall as a right-wing power grab, but struggled to get Democratic voters to pay attention until the entrance of controversial conservative radio host Larry Elder, who jumped into the race late and immediately shot to the top of the polls of replacement candidates.

Registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans in California nearly 2 to 1, so the only way the recall could succeed was if Democrats didn't bother voting or got behind the effort to remove Newsom. In the end, the state's liberals showed up in droves to back the Democrat and keep California out of the hands of someone like Elder.

National Democrats hope the race can be a model for next year's midterm elections, since Democrats have typically had a hard time motivating their voters in nonpresidential races.

Frustration with Covid-19 restrictions helped recall organizers gather the roughly 1.5 million signatures they needed to force the vote. But Newsom ended up making his support for mask and vaccine mandates the closing argument of his campaign, warning that a Republican replacement would undo his health restrictions if elected.

An NBC News exit poll found voters sided with Newsom on the public health measures, with a plurality, or 45 percent, saying Newsom’s Covid policies are about right, compared to 32 percent who said the measures are too strict. Another 18 percent said they aren’t strict enough.

The NBC News exit poll results of early and Election Day voters found 70 percent support Newsom’s mandate requiring students to wear masks in schools and 63 percent said getting vaccinated against the coronavirus is more a “public health responsibility” than a “personal choice."

The governor has been weighed down by a slew of issues facing the state, but those voting for and against recalling him had different views of which issues were most important, according to NBC News exit poll.

Among voters who wanted Newsom removed, the economy was the top issue for 27 percent of them, followed by homelessness, which was the top issue for 23 percent of those in favor of recall. Crime was the top issue for 17 percent, and the Covid pandemic for 15 percent, according to the exit poll.

The pandemic was the top issue for 42 percent of those who wanted to keep Newsom in office. That was followed by homelessness, cited by 22 percent; wildfires, 18 percent; the economy, 9 percent; and crime, 2 percent.

As polls showed Newsom likely to survive the recall, Republicans began to sow baseless seeds of doubt about the integrity of the vote, with former President Donald Trump calling it "rigged" and Elder's campaign promoting a website that claimed it had found fraud in the results before any were even released.

David Marcus: California recall result hinges on this key issue

Fox News 14 September, 2021 - 11:00pm

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Co-owner of Sonoma Fit Adam Kovacs joins 'Fox & Friends First' and tells his story of how the pandemic and the governor's lockdowns hurt his business, says it's time to recall Gavin Newsom

As the sun set over the great Pacific in Venice Beach on Monday, so too did it set on the California recall election. With only Election Day left to go most ballots have already been cast. Gavin Newsom’s future rests in votes that now mostly just have to be counted.

On the Venice boardwalk with its burger spots and mildly offensive T-shirts for sale, signs of the election were few and far between.

A small camera crew for a cable news network interviewed some passersby. One older gentleman doing a workout in his Make America Great Again hat exercised while listening to conservative radio. But mostly what was in the air was the wafting smell of weed, not excitement over Election Day.

"I want him to be recalled but it’s not going to happen," J.J. told me. I heard that a lot. 

He is a retired Los Angeles cop who lives in Venice Beach. "I’m a conservative," he told me, somewhat quietly, adding, "but have all the drugs and abortions you want." 

We landed on the idea that maybe he is more of a libertarian. His pessimism regarding the recall was rooted in a belief that most Californians just don’t care. 

It was clear that this attitude was informed by his police work, where he felt his hands were tied by the government. 

He used to work at Los Angeles International Airport, where he told me homeless and mentally ill people would just take over spaces, in part because of free WiFi, and that police couldn’t stop it. 

On the Venice promenade it did seem like efforts by Sheriff Alex Villenueva this summer had helped to remove encampments along the beach. And yet still, there were many lost souls, with seemingly nothing to do and little life in their eyes. I also saw a quick fist fight which seemed to amuse the tourists filming it on their phones.

But not everybody thinks that there is a crisis in California under Newsom’s leadership. Kasey, a CPA, told me that he fully supports the governor, saying, "I think he’s done a pretty good job." 

You can see why someone in Los Angeles might feel differently about Newsom’s performance than someone in San Francisco. In the Bay area COVID restrictions are harsher. Nobody asked for my vaccination in card in L.A. and the put on your mask -- take off your mask dance entering restaurants is more silly than onerous.

One question I asked several people who think Newsom will survive the recall effort, and that was most people, was if it might be different if Election Day had been six months ago. 

Almost all told me that back then Newsom would probably have lost. It is difficult to tell how much of that attitude is driven by a sense that California is coming out of the COVID crisis, or if they have simply resigned themselves to it.

After spending 7 days in California, from San Francisco, to the Central Valley, to the beaches of L.A., what I saw was not a state in crisis but one in which a state of crisis seems to hang over certain areas. But the people I spoke to for the most part can compartmentalize the very obvious bad signs, the lack of order in some places and what impacts their day to day life. 

If Gavin Newsom survives the recall it will be because their day to day lives do not feel like emergencies that must be addressed by removing the governor.

David Marcus is a columnist living in New York City and the author of "Charade: The Covid Lies That Crushed A Nation." 

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This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2021 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. Quotes displayed in real-time or delayed by at least 15 minutes. Market data provided by Factset. Powered and implemented by FactSet Digital Solutions. Legal Statement. Mutual Fund and ETF data provided by Refinitiv Lipper.

California Recall Election Results

The New York Times 14 September, 2021 - 11:00am

Disabling auto-updates may improve reliability when using a screen reader or keyboard to navigate.

If more than 50 percent of voters vote yes on the recall, Mr. Newsom must step down as governor.

There are 46 candidates listed on the ballot — a mix of politicians, entertainers and business people, more than half of them Republican. If a majority votes in favor of a recall on Question 1, the challenger who receives the most votes will become governor. Larry Elder, a conservative talk radio host, leads the challengers in most polls. Since 1960, every California governor has faced a recall attempt. Only one has ever reached an election. In 2003, Governor Gray Davis, a Democrat, lost to Arnold Schwarzenegger.

This election might be over, but Gov. Gavin Newsom faces another one in November 2022. No doubt he’ll use this recall as evidence that voters want him to stay in office.

This election might be over, but Gov. Gavin Newsom faces another one in November 2022. No doubt he’ll use this recall as evidence that voters want him to stay in office.

Republicans have made it clear that they will sow doubt in the results of the election, but a large margin of victory will make it more difficult for them to do so without any evidence.

I’d caution against extrapolating too many national political lessons from this recall. Is it telling us something about pandemic politics? Sure. Is a recall a highly idiosyncratic process? Also, yes.

John Francis Peters for The New York Times

I’m getting emails from big unions taking credit for powering the governor’s victory. Many orchestrated big get-out-the-vote efforts. I suspect they won’t hesitate to remind him of this down the line.

Gavin Newsom just became the second governor in U.S. history to beat back a recall attempt. The only other person to ever do so was Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin in 2012.

Expect to hear comparisons between the last successful California recall — which put Schwarzenegger in office in 2003 — and today. California was still a blue state two decades ago, but Schwarzenegger ran on local issues. Larry Elder, the leading Republican this time, really leaned into the national culture war.

Gov. Gavin Newsom is speaking now. “No is not the only thing that was expressed tonight,” he says. “We said yes to science, yes to vaccines, yes to ending this pandemic.”

Many of the biggest pro-recall numbers we’re seeing are from smaller, rural counties in far northern California, where residents bridled at pandemic restrictions.

What we’re seeing now are the most Democratic friendly votes, but the results mirror the most recent polls that showed Newsom with a comfortable lead. The recall would need to have a massive surge of in-person voting in multiple counties to catch up.

After this round of early mail ballots is reported, expect things to slow to crawl. The Election Day vote could take as long as 24 hours to count. After that, the late mail ballots could take weeks.

Gavin Newsom was expected to speak early tonight, and it will be interesting to watch how fast he comes out in Sacramento. If he’s feeling confident, we could hear from him soon.

Why haven’t any news organizations made a call? They might want to see at least a little bit of the Election Day vote and turnout before projecting the outcome, given the wide split between Election Day and mail voting in the last election.

As the way Californians vote shifts increasingly toward mail and early voting, election officials will need to figure out how to ensure that anyone who wants to vote in person on Election Day can do so without encountering long waits. I heard some grumbling in Irvine this afternoon.

Early result: “no” at 72 percent in Napa County, the heavily Democratic wine country north of the Bay Area. Newsom won 65 percent of the vote in Napa in 2018, so this is a strong showing for him in the early going.

Wow, the effects of mail-in voting. It hasn’t even been 30 minutes since the polls closed and the estimates are that more than 40 percent of the count is already in.

There are two ways this could go down, and both are arguably historic. Newsom could become the third governor to be recalled from office in U.S. history, or he could be the second to beat back a recall effort (the other is Wisconsin’s Scott Walker).

The first batch of votes to be reported are mail-in ballots returned before Election Day. Democrats have historically voted in higher numbers by mail. Newsom strategists expect a big advantage in these early returns — particularly in populous counties like San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Several of Newsom’s advisers have pointed to Senator Dianne Feinstein as a hopeful precedent. In 1983, Feinstein, then mayor of San Francisco, beat back an attempted recall by more than 80 percent and emerged stronger than ever.

Special elections tend to attract fewer people to the polls, but mail-in voting may give the numbers a boost. During the last recall election of a California governor, in 2003, 61 percent of registered voters cast ballots.

A crucial group with relatively low turnout: young voters. 28 percent of the ballots mailed for this election went to voters 18 to 34, the largest share of any age group. But those voters have returned the fewest ballots so far.

Ryan Young for The New York Times

Source: Election results and race calls from The Associated Press

By Michael Andre, Aliza Aufrichtig, Andrew Fischer, Jasmine C. Lee and Isaac WhiteShawn Hubler contributed reporting.

California Recall Election Results

CNN 14 September, 2021 - 11:00am

Disabling auto-updates may improve reliability when using a screen reader or keyboard to navigate.

If more than 50 percent of voters vote yes on the recall, Mr. Newsom must step down as governor.

There are 46 candidates listed on the ballot — a mix of politicians, entertainers and business people, more than half of them Republican. If a majority votes in favor of a recall on Question 1, the challenger who receives the most votes will become governor. Larry Elder, a conservative talk radio host, leads the challengers in most polls. Since 1960, every California governor has faced a recall attempt. Only one has ever reached an election. In 2003, Governor Gray Davis, a Democrat, lost to Arnold Schwarzenegger.

I’d caution against extrapolating too many national political lessons from this recall. Is it telling us something about pandemic politics? Sure. Is a recall a highly idiosyncratic process? Also, yes.

I’d caution against extrapolating too many national political lessons from this recall. Is it telling us something about pandemic politics? Sure. Is a recall a highly idiosyncratic process? Also, yes.

I’m getting emails from big unions taking credit for powering the governor’s victory. Many orchestrated big get-out-the-vote efforts. I suspect they won’t hesitate to remind him of this down the line.

Gavin Newsom just became the second governor in U.S. history to beat back a recall attempt. The only other person to ever do so was Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin in 2012.

Expect to hear comparisons between the last successful California recall — which put Schwarzenegger in office in 2003 — and today. California was still a blue state two decades ago, but Schwarzenegger ran on local issues. Larry Elder, the leading Republican this time, really leaned into the national culture war.

Gov. Gavin Newsom is speaking now. “No is not the only thing that was expressed tonight,” he says. “We said yes to science, yes to vaccines, yes to ending this pandemic.”

Many of the biggest pro-recall numbers we’re seeing are from smaller, rural counties in far northern California, where residents bridled at pandemic restrictions.

What we’re seeing now are the most Democratic friendly votes, but the results mirror the most recent polls that showed Newsom with a comfortable lead. The recall would need to have a massive surge of in-person voting in multiple counties to catch up.

After this round of early mail ballots is reported, expect things to slow to crawl. The Election Day vote could take as long as 24 hours to count. After that, the late mail ballots could take weeks.

Gavin Newsom was expected to speak early tonight, and it will be interesting to watch how fast he comes out in Sacramento. If he’s feeling confident, we could hear from him soon.

Why haven’t any news organizations made a call? They might want to see at least a little bit of the Election Day vote and turnout before projecting the outcome, given the wide split between Election Day and mail voting in the last election.

As the way Californians vote shifts increasingly toward mail and early voting, election officials will need to figure out how to ensure that anyone who wants to vote in person on Election Day can do so without encountering long waits. I heard some grumbling in Irvine this afternoon.

Early result: “no” at 72 percent in Napa County, the heavily Democratic wine country north of the Bay Area. Newsom won 65 percent of the vote in Napa in 2018, so this is a strong showing for him in the early going.

Wow, the effects of mail-in voting. It hasn’t even been 30 minutes since the polls closed and the estimates are that more than 40 percent of the count is already in.

There are two ways this could go down, and both are arguably historic. Newsom could become the third governor to be recalled from office in U.S. history, or he could be the second to beat back a recall effort (the other is Wisconsin’s Scott Walker).

The first batch of votes to be reported are mail-in ballots returned before Election Day. Democrats have historically voted in higher numbers by mail. Newsom strategists expect a big advantage in these early returns — particularly in populous counties like San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Several of Newsom’s advisers have pointed to Senator Dianne Feinstein as a hopeful precedent. In 1983, Feinstein, then mayor of San Francisco, beat back an attempted recall by more than 80 percent and emerged stronger than ever.

Special elections tend to attract fewer people to the polls, but mail-in voting may give the numbers a boost. During the last recall election of a California governor, in 2003, 61 percent of registered voters cast ballots.

A crucial group with relatively low turnout: young voters. 28 percent of the ballots mailed for this election went to voters 18 to 34, the largest share of any age group. But those voters have returned the fewest ballots so far.

Ryan Young for The New York Times

Newsom has been warning that he is what stands between California becoming Texas or Florida, and has pointed to Florida’s high Covid-19 numbers and Texas’s stringent abortion ban.

The recall probably couldn’t have happened without Covid-19. It gave Gov. Gavin Newsom's opponents an extension to circulate petitions, made Californians anxious and agitated, and got Newsom in trouble with that dinner at The French Laundry.

Ariana Drehsler for The New York Times

Source: Election results and race calls from The Associated Press

By Michael Andre, Aliza Aufrichtig, Andrew Fischer, Jasmine C. Lee and Isaac WhiteShawn Hubler contributed reporting.

California Recall Election Results

The Arizona Republic 14 September, 2021 - 11:00am

Disabling auto-updates may improve reliability when using a screen reader or keyboard to navigate.

If more than 50 percent of voters vote yes on the recall, Mr. Newsom must step down as governor.

There are 46 candidates listed on the ballot — a mix of politicians, entertainers and business people, more than half of them Republican. If a majority votes in favor of a recall on Question 1, the challenger who receives the most votes will become governor. Larry Elder, a conservative talk radio host, leads the challengers in most polls. Since 1960, every California governor has faced a recall attempt. Only one has ever reached an election. In 2003, Governor Gray Davis, a Democrat, lost to Arnold Schwarzenegger.

I’d caution against extrapolating too many national political lessons from this recall. Is it telling us something about pandemic politics? Sure. Is a recall a highly idiosyncratic process? Also, yes.

I’d caution against extrapolating too many national political lessons from this recall. Is it telling us something about pandemic politics? Sure. Is a recall a highly idiosyncratic process? Also, yes.

I’m getting emails from big unions taking credit for powering the governor’s victory. Many orchestrated big get-out-the-vote efforts. I suspect they won’t hesitate to remind him of this down the line.

Gavin Newsom just became the second governor in U.S. history to beat back a recall attempt. The only other person to ever do so was Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin in 2012.

Expect to hear comparisons between the last successful California recall — which put Schwarzenegger in office in 2003 — and today. California was still a blue state two decades ago, but Schwarzenegger ran on local issues. Larry Elder, the leading Republican this time, really leaned into the national culture war.

Gov. Gavin Newsom is speaking now. “No is not the only thing that was expressed tonight,” he says. “We said yes to science, yes to vaccines, yes to ending this pandemic.”

Many of the biggest pro-recall numbers we’re seeing are from smaller, rural counties in far northern California, where residents bridled at pandemic restrictions.

What we’re seeing now are the most Democratic friendly votes, but the results mirror the most recent polls that showed Newsom with a comfortable lead. The recall would need to have a massive surge of in-person voting in multiple counties to catch up.

After this round of early mail ballots is reported, expect things to slow to crawl. The Election Day vote could take as long as 24 hours to count. After that, the late mail ballots could take weeks.

Gavin Newsom was expected to speak early tonight, and it will be interesting to watch how fast he comes out in Sacramento. If he’s feeling confident, we could hear from him soon.

Why haven’t any news organizations made a call? They might want to see at least a little bit of the Election Day vote and turnout before projecting the outcome, given the wide split between Election Day and mail voting in the last election.

As the way Californians vote shifts increasingly toward mail and early voting, election officials will need to figure out how to ensure that anyone who wants to vote in person on Election Day can do so without encountering long waits. I heard some grumbling in Irvine this afternoon.

Early result: “no” at 72 percent in Napa County, the heavily Democratic wine country north of the Bay Area. Newsom won 65 percent of the vote in Napa in 2018, so this is a strong showing for him in the early going.

Wow, the effects of mail-in voting. It hasn’t even been 30 minutes since the polls closed and the estimates are that more than 40 percent of the count is already in.

There are two ways this could go down, and both are arguably historic. Newsom could become the third governor to be recalled from office in U.S. history, or he could be the second to beat back a recall effort (the other is Wisconsin’s Scott Walker).

The first batch of votes to be reported are mail-in ballots returned before Election Day. Democrats have historically voted in higher numbers by mail. Newsom strategists expect a big advantage in these early returns — particularly in populous counties like San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Several of Newsom’s advisers have pointed to Senator Dianne Feinstein as a hopeful precedent. In 1983, Feinstein, then mayor of San Francisco, beat back an attempted recall by more than 80 percent and emerged stronger than ever.

Special elections tend to attract fewer people to the polls, but mail-in voting may give the numbers a boost. During the last recall election of a California governor, in 2003, 61 percent of registered voters cast ballots.

A crucial group with relatively low turnout: young voters. 28 percent of the ballots mailed for this election went to voters 18 to 34, the largest share of any age group. But those voters have returned the fewest ballots so far.

Ryan Young for The New York Times

Newsom has been warning that he is what stands between California becoming Texas or Florida, and has pointed to Florida’s high Covid-19 numbers and Texas’s stringent abortion ban.

The recall probably couldn’t have happened without Covid-19. It gave Gov. Gavin Newsom's opponents an extension to circulate petitions, made Californians anxious and agitated, and got Newsom in trouble with that dinner at The French Laundry.

Ariana Drehsler for The New York Times

Source: Election results and race calls from The Associated Press

By Michael Andre, Aliza Aufrichtig, Andrew Fischer, Jasmine C. Lee and Isaac WhiteShawn Hubler contributed reporting.

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