Queen makes heartbreaking change to her social media after Prince Philip's death

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Mirror Online 28 April, 2021 - 10:18am 14 views

Will Prince Charles become king?

No: Charles will become King the moment the Queen dies. The Accession Council merely acknowledges and proclaims that he is the new King, following the death of the Queen. It is not necessary for the monarch to be crowned in order to become King: Edward VIII reigned as King without ever being crowned. ucl.ac.ukPlanning the next Accession and Coronation: FAQs | The Constitution Unit - UCL – University College London

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Queen seen via videolink conducting first engagements since Prince Philip's funeral

Daily Mail 30 April, 2021 - 04:01am

By James Robinson for MailOnline

The Queen's stoic spirit shone through today as she returned to work with a beaming smile in her first photographed engagement since the funeral of her beloved Prince Philip.

No longer dressed in a black mourning outfit, the monarch, 95, was seen via videolink from Windsor Castle while welcoming dignitaries to Buckingham Palace.

Appearing on screen dressed in a pale blue floral dress with pearls, she held a virtual audience to receive Her Excellency Ivita Burmistre, the Ambassador of Latvia, at Buckingham Palace. 

She also received Her Excellency Sara Affoue Amani, the Ambassador of Cote d'Ivoire, during the virtual meeting.

It comes 10 days after the funeral of her husband Prince Philip, who died at the age of 99 earlier this month. 

The Queen has returned to work as she today conducted her first engagements since Prince Philip's funeral

She appeared on screen with a beaming smile during a virtual audience to receive Her Excellency Ivita Burmistre, the Ambassador of Latvia, at Buckingham Palace

She also received Her Excellency Sara Affoue Amani, the Ambassador of Cote d'Ivoire, at Buckingham Palace

It comes after the funeral of her husband Prince Philip, who died at the age of 99 earlier this month. Pictured: The Queen at the funeral of her beloved husband Prince Philip on April 17

Though it is the first time the Queen has been photographed working since the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral, on April 17, it is not the first time she has been back to work since his death.

The Queen returned to royal duties just four days after the death of the Duke of Edinburgh on April 9.

On that occasion she attended retirement ceremony for the former Lord Chamberlain Earl Peel on Tuesday. 

Then, in her second official engagement since Prince Philip's death, she welcomed her new Lord Chamberlain to his post.

Notably, in her most recent appearance today the Queen was pictured no longer in a black mourning outfit.

She was dressed in a pale blue floral dress which featured large purple, white and yellow flowers, with a three-string pearl necklace and a diamond brooch as accessories. 

Two weeks of royal mourning in memory of the Queen's husband of 73 years ended for the monarchy and their households on Friday April 23, meaning the Windsors were allowed to go back to work full-time.

The royal family gathered for a poignant final farewell to Philip on April 17 at a socially-distanced funeral service in St George's Chapel, with the Queen pictured sat alone as she grieved for her consort. 

The Queen turned 95 just 12 days after the duke died and used her birthday to release a message thanking well-wishers for their tribute to Philip.

She said she and her family were in a 'period of great sadness' but were comforted by words of praise for the duke.

'We have been deeply touched and continue to be reminded that Philip had such an extraordinary impact on countless people throughout his life,' she added.

The Queen appears on a screen by videolink from Windsor Castle, where she is in residence, during a virtual audience to receive Her Excellency Sara Affoue Amani, the Ambassador of Cote d'Ivoire

It was all smiles for both the Queen and Her Excellency Ivita Burmistre, the Ambassador of Latvia during the virtual meeting at Buckingham Palace today

Ivita Burmistre, ambassador from the Republic of Latvia, presented the Letters of Recall of her predecessor and her own Letters of Credence at the audience, as did Sara Affoue Amani, ambassador from the Republic of Cote d'Ivoire.

Earlier this month, and just four days after the death of Prince Philip, the Queen bid farewell to Earl Peel - a key royal aide who retired after 14 years of service.

Earl Peel was the Lord Chamberlain - the most senior officer role in the royal household.

While the Queen has returned to work following her husband's death, she is unlikely to return to her hectic schedule of busy meetings, garden parties and receptions, and may only go to Buckingham Palace two days a week for meetings. The Queen and Prince Philip are pictured in Windsor Castle's quadrangle in June 2020 to mark the Duke's 99th birthday

It comes as a former BBC royal correspondent claimed the Queen is now set to step back from royal duties as she prepares for a future without Prince Philip

Speaking to the New York Times,  Peter Hunt, who worked as at the BBC until 2017, said: 'Fundamentally, the Queen will fade away gracefully.

'Covid has helped in the sense that it has accelerated what any sensible 95-year-old woman would want to do, which is not stand on your feet all day long'.

He added that while the Queen has returned to work following her husband's death, she is unlikely to return to her hectic schedule of busy meetings, garden parties and receptions, and may only go to Buckingham Palace two days a week for meetings.

Instead she is likely to stay at Windsor Castle, where she has been in quarantine for most of the last year.  

Prince Charles will likely take on more duties, including joining his mother in the state opening on parliament next month.

The monarch has overseen every one of the constitutional set pieces since taking the throne in 1952, apart from in 1959 and 1963 when she was pregnant with Prince Andrew and Prince Edward respectively.

While the Duke of Edinburgh only missed the event once, 12 months before he retired in 2018, when he was hospitalised.

It comes as a royal expert claimed Prince Charles wants to slim the monarchy down in order to save money.

Royal biographer Angela Levin said the Duke and Duchess of Sussex - who currently live in an £11million mansion in California with their son Archie could be 'cut' from The Firm, with a shrunk down version just including Charles, Camilla, William, Kate Middleton, Princes George and Louis and Princess Charlotte as senior royals.

The Queen will attend the State Opening of Parliament in May accompanied by her son Prince Charles, who has supported her at the ceremonial event since his father retired in 2018

Other royals could be encouraged to take on paid work to help support themselves - and may lose their titles and patronages. 

Ms Levin said on talkRADIO: 'Prince Charles has wanted for a very long time to cut the monarchy down to save costs and to make people be worth the money that they got from the taxpayer.

'I imagine that might be when Harry and Meghan are ditched from being members of the Royal family. 

'I think the outer edge, which the Queen has wanted to keep together for a very long time for sentimental reasons, which at her age she didn't really particularly want change which I think is understandable.

'But he wants to change and I think he will do that.'  

The Countess of Wessex has said the Queen 'loves it when people get together and make things happen' as she celebrated The Gambia's achievement of becoming trachoma free.

Sophie, who is a global ambassador for the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), held a video call last month ahead of the official announcement, and described the news as 'wonderful'.

The Countess of Wessex has said the Queen (pictured together in 2019) 'loves it when people get together and make things happen' as she celebrated The Gambia's achievement of becoming trachoma free

The World Health Organisation (WHO) confirmed last week that The Gambia had successfully eliminated trachoma - which is a type of bacterial eye infection and the world's number one infectious cause of blindness. 

Sophie (pictured), who is a global ambassador for the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), held a video call last month ahead of the official announcement, and described the news as 'wonderful'

Sophie, 56, also praised the Queen, who is now mourning the loss of the Duke of Edinburgh, for her support for tackling avoidable blindness across the Commonwealth. 

She said the monarch had taken a personal interest and 'loves it when people get together and make things happen'.

The countess revealed: 'Her Majesty is so supportive of this kind of work. For her to have chosen sight as the main pillar of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust Fund during its time was so reaffirming.

'She has genuinely taken a personal interest in that work. 

'When I was travelling on her behalf to be able to come back and tell her what I've seen, what I've learnt, the work that was going on ... she loves collaboration; she loves it when people get together and make things happen.'

Trachoma is a type of bacterial eye infection and the world's number one infectious cause of blindness.

The bacterial infection can, if left untreated, cause irreversible blindness. Some 137million people are at risk of trachoma globally.

It is a public health problem in 44 countries, and responsible for the blindness or visual impairment of about 1.9million people.

The disease is caused by infection with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. 

Commenting on the news, the countess added: 'In our lifetime, to see something that has been so prevalent and has destroyed so many lives actually being beaten is wonderful.'

She continued: 'Without the commitment from the top down and the bottom up, none of this would have come about. We stand in awe of what has been achieved.'  

In October, the Queen and her daughter-in-law joined a call with eye health professionals throughout the Commonwealth to mark World Sight Day.

At the end of March, Sophie spoke with key representatives from The Gambian government, including vice-president Isatou Touray, and the international community, who have collaborated for decades to fight the disease.

The country's ministry of health has worked with organisations including the International Trachoma Initiative, WHO, the Medical Research Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Unicef and Sightsavers.

The bacterial infection can, if left untreated, cause irreversible blindness. Some 137million people are at risk of trachoma globally.

It is a public health problem in 44 countries, and responsible for the blindness or visual impairment of about 1.9million people. 

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The Earl and Countess of Wessex, with their daughter Lady Louise Windsor, during a television interview at the Royal Chapel of All Saints, Windsor, following the announcement on Friday April 9, of the death of the Duke of Edinburgh at the age of 99 

Meanwhile, Sophie is one of four loyal, discreet and ‘utterly trustworthy’ women of the Queen’s inner circle who are offering crucial support as she faces life without her beloved Prince Philip, who died on April 9, aged 99.

‘Sophie is like another daughter to the Queen, they are that close,’ said a royal source. ‘She is trusted and relied on like few others.’ 

The pair are said to speak at least once a day and enjoy regular Saturday ‘movie afternoons’ when they watch old films together. 

Bless her. Her Majesty really is a remarkable woma...

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Prince Charles' plans could see senior royals cut to just seven

Coventry Live 30 April, 2021 - 04:01am

An expert has claimed that Prince Charles plans a radical royal shake-up with a slimmed-down monarchy of potentially just seven people.

Royal biographer Angela Levin has said the Prince of Wales intends to ‘cut the monarchy down’ in a bid to save money.

The expert on the Royal Family also thinks the move could see Prince Harry and Meghan Markle cut loose.

The speculation comes after Prince Charles and Prince William were set to discuss the future of the monarchy following Prince Philip’s death.

A scaled-down monarchy could see just Charles, Camilla, William, the Duchess of Cambridge, Princes George and Louis and Princess Charlotte as senior royals, the MailOnline reports.

Ms Levin said on talkRADIO: “Prince Charles has wanted for a very long time to cut the monarchy down to save costs and to make people be worth the money that they got from the taxpayer."

She added: “I imagine that might be when Harry and Meghan are ditched from being members of the royal family.

“I think the outer edge, which the Queen has wanted to keep together for a very long time for sentimental reasons, which at her age she didn’t really particularly want change which I think is understandable.

“But he wants to change and I think he will do that.”

Ongoing speculation of the role the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will or will not play in the royal family, comes ahead of the publication of a new version of a best-selling biography of the couple - Finding Freedom.

It is set to be released this summer.

The first edition, by authors Omid Scobie and Carolyn Durand, was published on August 11 last year .

It told the story of of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex from when they met in 2016 to their break from the royal family in 2020.

The Sunday Times said it is now being updated with new chapters, covering their interview with Oprah Winfrey last month, the allegations that Meghan, 39, bullied royal staff - which she denies - and the death of Prince Philip.

The new version, which is also expected to discuss their multi-million pound deals with Netflix and Spotify and their new life in California.

It will go on sale on August 5.

Prince Harry has now returned to the US, having flown to the UK for Prince Philip’s funeral.

It was his first trip back to Britain in a year and the first meet-up with his family following the much talked about Oprah interview.

Prince Philip's Secrets to Long Life & a Favorite Recipe

msnNOW 30 April, 2021 - 04:01am

Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth II were married in 1947 and had been married for more than 70 years at the time of his death. He officially departed from his royal duties at age 96, and after that he spent most of his time at Queen Elizabeth II's estate in Sandringham.

The Duke of Edinburgh would have turned 100 on June 10 and would have become the only royal man to achieve this historic milestone—and still, he was the third oldest member of the Royal Family in British history. Discover the the secrets to His Majesty's longevity, as well as one of his personal favorite recipes.

Prince Philip was a known foodie, so much so that he thoroughly enjoyed cooking for himself, the Queen and his family on various occasions. In the book Dinner at Buckingham Palace by former royal footman Charles Oliver, the Duke is said to have brought his electric glass-lidded frying pan wherever he went, preparing breakfast and supper snacks as his specialties. Former royal chef Darren McGrady also said on his YouTube channel that during summer stays at Balmoral, Prince Philip would often grill several days a week. Though most of his dishes were simple, he didn't shy away from experimenting with different flavors and new preparations.

While he hasn't directly shared his eating habits with the public, royal chefs have said that Prince Philip followed a mostly low-carb diet that focused on meats, fish, fruits, low-starch vegetables, nuts, seeds, vegetable oils and high-fat dairy. He also happened to be a very light drinker, avoiding alcohol and sticking mainly to beer for certain occasions. Both of these habits contributed to the fact that he was able to remain roughly the same size his entire life.

Prince Philip quit smoking cold turkey sometime before his wedding to Queen Elizabeth II. It is said that he was influenced to quit, following King George VI's death from lung cancer, which resulted from a heavy smoking habit throughout his lifetime. That decision alone could have added almost a decade to his life.

In 2016, Prince Philip famously said he hadn't had the flu in the past 40 years. He rarely fell ill, thanks to his strong immune system, which was almost certainly reinforced by his healthy diet and active lifestyle. It wasn't until the past few years that he started to suffer various health problems, more likely associated with his old age.

Prince Philip remained a working member of the royal family until the age of 96. While it's certainly not mandatory (or even recommended) for people to work well past retirement age, studies have shown that it may improve one's chances at maintaining good health and keeping severe health problems at bay. Staying active, social and busy for so long may also have helped keep Prince Philip's mind sharp and increased his overall happiness and fulfillment. Having a sense of purpose has been seen as a common factor of longevity among peoples who live exceptionally long lives. The important thing is to love what you do!

Prince Philip alway had his first meal of the day at 8:30 am in the palace. While he enjoyed a good English breakfast time and again, he also often stuck with a routine of cereal, porridge, marmalade, maple syrup, fresh fruit and yogurt. According to Charles Oliver, when preparing breakfast for himself, Prince Philip usually went for bacon, eggs and sausages, or omelettes and kidneys. Despite the rise in popularity of intermittent fasting (which usually involves skipping breakfast), it can be very beneficial to start one's day with hearty breakfast, to kick-start the metabolism and avoid hunger pangs before lunchtime.

Besides serving in the Royal Navy for nearly 14 years (he finished as a commander), Prince Philip was athletic for most of his life, having taken an interest in cricket, hockey, rowing, polo, sailing, and later on carriage driving—the latter is an actual equestrian sport that provides plenty of adrenaline. He also apparently completed HIIT workouts on the daily, such as a simple 5BX routine, created by the Royal Canadian Air Force in the 50's. This includes an 11-minute workout of 5 basic exercises: stretching, sit-ups, back extensions, push-ups and running in place. And of course, he enjoyed hunting, fishing and shooting as outdoor leisure pursuits.

Try one of Prince Philip's favorite recipes: Mushrooms à la crème!

Hungry for more?  Here are 30 facts about the royals and their food.

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Prince Charles blamed Queen and Philip for 'abandoning him' during his 'dark years'

Express 29 April, 2021 - 02:07am

Prince Charles has spoken about his childhood on several occasions and gave a detailed account to Jonathan Dimbleby for his 1994 biography and documentary on the royal. The Prince of Wales, then 46, told the journalist he felt "neglected and abandoned when he was a child". But a royal expert has explained why Prince Charles decided to speak publicly about this - and was adamant this was not an accurate portrayal of the heir's childhood.

As a result, the expert felt the Prince of Wales lashed out at the world and looked for someone to blame for how he was feeling, which unfortunately fell on his parents.

Mr Brandreth told Express.co.uk: "Prince Charles was I think in the 1990s in what we would now call a dark place.

"And when you are in a dark place dark thoughts come into your head.

"And the dark thoughts that were in his head, and we know this because he gave interviews himself, he talked about feelings of elements of neglect and abandonment when he was a child.

"Not being loved. Those were the feelings that he had."

Mr Brandreth explained that his resentment at the time lay largely because he was grappling with his failed marriage - having separated from Princess Diana two years before.

But Prince Charles harsh portrayal of his parents was completely inaccurate, according to the biographer, who said the comments were just "a reflection of where Charles was at that time".

He added: "Often where you are is how you see the world.

"So if you are in a dark corner personally, the world seems in a dark place.

"And you look back on your childhood and that seems a dark place and you feel you need to blame somebody."

But Mr Brandreth said Prince Charles' ill feelings towards his childhood "completely changed" in the years to come when he returned to a better place. 

Mr Brandreth further discussed the issue of Charles's supposed neglectful childhood in his new book, Philip: The Final Portrait.

He wrote: " In the early 1990s, when he cooperated with the broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby to produce a documentary and a book about his life, the Prince of Wales made it clear to all the world that, as a boy, he had felt neglected at home and abandoned at school.

"His parents did not cherish him, or understand him, in the way that his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, did."

But in the years to come, Mr Brandreth said "it became clear... that his view had changed.

"It was evident from those old family films – as it always had been from the accounts of those who had been there at the time – that the Queen and Prince Philip had been loving parents: caring, concerned, and, given the style of parenting of those of their class and generation and the restrictions imposed on them by their official duties, remarkably hands-on."

Queen Elizabeth Wore a Brooch in Tribute to Prince Philip During Her First Official Public Appearance Since His Funeral

Vanity Fair 28 April, 2021 - 01:11pm

Queen Elizabeth subtly paid tribute to her late husband Prince Philip during her first official public appearance since his funeral.

On Tuesday, the monarch held two virtual royal audiences over a video call from Windsor Castle where she has been staying throughout the pandemic. She spoke with Ivita Burmistre, ambassador from the Republic of Latvia, and Sara Affoue Amani, ambassador from the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, who met with the royal remotely from Buckingham Palace. At one point during the conversation, the royal even broke into a big smile.

For the occasion, the Queen chose to wear a very symbolic piece of jewelry—as she often does—opting for a diamond-encrusted Cartier rose brooch that was given to her by Asaf Jah VII, the Nizam of Hyderabad, to commemorate her 1947 marriage to the Duke of Edinburgh. At the time, India was still under British colonial rule and, as the richest man in the world, Jah instructed Cartier to let the then-princess pick anything from their existing stock for her wedding gift. Elizabeth chose an ornate tiara and coordinating necklace which date to 1935. Ever since then, the necklace has remained a staple of the Queen's extensive collection, and she even lent it to her granddaughter-in-law, Kate Middleton, in 2014. The tiara, however, was dismantled in 1973, but the Queen did preserve three diamond rosettes from the original piece, turning them into brooches—the largest of which the royal wore on Tuesday.

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Opinion: Empathetic leaders like Prince Philip are needed to reduce global strife

The Globe and Mail 27 April, 2021 - 01:30pm

Audio for this article is not available at this time.

This translation has been automatically generated and has not been verified for accuracy. Full Disclaimer

It has been more than two weeks since the passing of Prince Philip. That has given us all time to reflect on the lessons from his life. For me the most compelling of these is the idea of the servant leader.

Other eulogists have reflected on his grace, dedication, loyalty, ease and wit. They have applauded his consistency, wondered at his energy and acknowledged his seemingly boundless curiosity in matters technological, military, environmental, ceremonial, matrimonial and, given that he designed his own hearse, automotive. Appropriately they have saluted the global success of the youth-leadership program he conceived in the 1940s and formalized in the Duke of Edinburgh Awards program in the mid-1950s.

We should look deeper and urgently at his enduring legacy, given how the world is wobbling right now. It’s not just pessimists who are rightly dismayed by the continued rise of autocratic authority even in nations and states that were once democratic, inclusive and progressive. We can all be appalled by the degree to which leaders in both industry and government pursue their own interests rather than those of their constituents. And of course we are alarmed by the grossly selfish actions of segments of the public, whose reactions to those around them have become unbalanced, smug and vicious. Amid a global eruption of ego, the peaceful societies we have worked for centuries to build are in many ways unravelling.

The issues are numerous and complex. The risk of ignoring them, or even just mismanaging our responses, is life-threatening, both to individuals and to a rapidly growing number of species – humans among them. While we may be mystified why selfishness appeals to so many as defensible behaviour, we have no doubt what brought us to this crisis point: a lack of empathy from leadership.

The Duke was an extraordinary character. He was gracious, down to earth, loyal and enthusiastic in every aspect of his life. But most important, he lived a life of service and was never diminished by it. I saw that on many occasions, beginning in 2010 when my wife Sharon and I were to have our first audience with the Queen at Balmoral Castle before my installation as governor-general. At breakfast on Saturday, Her Majesty suggested Sharon spend a few hours at the stables, tending to the horses. Sharon was eager but surprised: not expecting a recreational weekend, she had packed only dress shoes. Prince Philip peered under the table, glanced at Sharon’s feet, turned to the Queen and said, “I think she’s your size.” Her Majesty disappeared from the breakfast table, returning moments later with a pair of well-worn brogues. Problem solved. In this moment, the Queen’s consort had overcome one possible obstacle to the Queen’s plans. His duty was to solve the Queen’s problems, however small.

Prince Philip worked his whole life to inspire others to move from self-interest to selfless service. He saw that dynamic in the military, where men and women dedicate themselves to keeping chaos at bay, routinely putting their lives on the line to do so. He revered them for it. That’s why he enthusiastically served as Colonel-in-Chief – or the equivalent – of 11 Canadian regiments and units. And it’s why he came to Canada on more than 60 separate occasions.

The Duke saw his role as that of servant. He knew he enjoyed a life of exceptional privilege; keenly aware of that he kept his life free of arrogance. He searched for where he could make a difference and, whether directed or on his own, dove in. For 70 years, he was everybody’s helper. He matters to us now precisely because he gave the world a long and steady view of the profound difference leaders can make when they act not in their own interests but rather in the interests of those who follow them. He was the model of the empathetic servant leader – one who puts the needs of others first, enabling them to develop and perform their duties better. Secure in that role, he stayed eager in his duty, confident in his role, comfortable in his own skin and, throughout, effective.

That’s why we all trusted him. If today’s leaders wish to be trusted, they would do well to follow the Prince’s footsteps by working harder to serve those who rely on them. No one needs to be dominated by their leaders; they need to be known, understood, supported and guided. Empathy at every level is the way out of this mess; if leaders learn, exercise and insist on such empathy, our world will soon be a better place, and a legacy Prince Philip might be pleased to see has at last been achieved.

Rest in peace, Prince Philip, as Scripture says, our “Good and faithful servant.” We salute you as we continue to send our deepest condolences to Her Majesty.

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