Rolling Stones Honor Charlie Watts In A Gig For Robert Kraft And Moderna Executive

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HuffPost 22 September, 2021 - 09:25am 20 views

"I stayed in an all-Black dorm at MIT, and I'm not sure we were the demographic you would have envisioned for that show," Patterson says with a laugh. "But it meant something to all of us because of the emotions involved. That speaks to how that show cut across so many different demos."

It also speaks to The Wonder Years' powerful approach to its coming-of-age story, which followed the 1960s adolescence of Kevin Arnold (Fred Savage) with a poignant mixture of nostalgia, wistfulness, and wry hindsight (courtesy of narration by Daniel Stern, as the adult Kevin).

"The thing that was so special about the show, and more broadly, about that time in your life, is that it was a very finite period of time that you can't revisit — this time of innocence and waking up to the world," muses Savage. "It only exists in this haze of memory and nostalgia to each one of us." That's why he always resisted the idea of rebooting the series, he adds: "I felt like to revisit those characters was antithetical not just to the show, but to that time in all of our lives."

"We've seen a lot of stories about the struggle of Black people during that time," says Patterson, "and those stories are important and necessary and needed. But what we haven't seen as much is the point of view of the Black middle class during that time, to see how the concept of the American Dream applied to them."

The new Wonder Years, debuting Wednesday on ABC, follows 12-year-old Dean Williams (Elisha "EJ" Williams) growing up in 1968 Montgomery. Patterson, who serves as showrunner, calls the series a "reimagining" of the original, or "a parallel story that also exists in the Wonder Years universe."

"People should not expect it to feel like a remake or reboot," he explains.

Still, the new series has a familiar flavor, as Patterson and his creative team strove to capture the original show's spirit while forging a new path for themselves. Like Kevin, Dean lives with his family (played by Dulé Hill, Saycon Sengbloh, and Laura Kariuki) in the suburbs, and struggles with the turbulent era he's coming of age in, as well as everyday adolescent challenges like school, bullies, and romance. And of course, his experiences are also narrated by his older self, with the voice of Don Cheadle.

"Dean's so relatable to me," says Williams, who won the role of Dean after an extensive national casting search. (His previous credits include the Nickelodeon series Henry Danger and Danger Force.) "I've mainly been doing it by just keeping it natural. And watching the old show definitely helped a lot with my comedic timing."

He also got an assist from someone who knows what it's like to carry a TV show at 12 years old. Savage came on board at Patterson's request to executive produce the series and direct the pilot, contributing both his plentiful experience directing television (Savage has helmed dozens of episodes for such shows as Modern Family and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and his firsthand knowledge of how The Wonder Years pulled off its tonal balancing act.

"Fred is our EJ whisperer," Patterson says. "He knows the language to use for a 12-year-old to tap into to be able to carry the show on his shoulders."

Recalls Williams, "One thing he always tells me is, when you're doing the scene, make sure it's through your eyes. Because eyes can tell a lot of story; you can sell fear in your eyes, you can sell energy in your eyes. That definitely helps."

He adds, "A lot of people ask how Black people can look back at the late '60s with nostalgia. The reality is, we have nostalgia because of the resilience of the Black family, because of the fortitude that we've had to develop as Black people. And what we really want to tap into is those universal feelings about growing up. There's something about human nature where we look back to those formative years of adolescence, regardless of what happened, and still find moments of joy and happiness. Our show is going to show those moments, but not pretend like the moments of sadness, frustration, disappointment, and discouragement didn't exist."

Adds Savage, "We want to keep that same sense of nostalgia and warmth, of optimism and joy, but also that sense of how you feel when your heart gets broken for the first time, or when you see your parents as actual human beings for the first time. We want to really toe that line between comedy and drama that I think the original did so well."

But again: Don't call it a remake. "I felt like we were in familiar territory," Savage says, "but it didn't feel like déjà vu. It felt like we were building something brand new."

The Wonder Years premieres Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on ABC.

This reimagining of the classic coming-of-age series follows young Dean Williams growing up in a middle-class Black family in 1960s Montgomery, Ala.

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That Time Charlie Watts, Ringo Starr and John Bonham Hung Out

Ultimate Classic Rock 22 September, 2021 - 02:23pm

Ringo Starr remembered an amusing encounter he had with Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts at a party at Starr's home in the '70s. The night also included an appearance from Led Zeppelin's John Bonham.

"I had a drum kit up in the attic - it was like a cinema attic, music, whatever you want to do up there," Starr said during a recent press conference. "Charlie came, and so did John Bonham. We’ve got three drummers, just hanging out. Bonham got on the kit. But because it was just like … you know, it’s not like onstage, where you nail them down, so they’re steady. It was just like there. So as he was playing, the bass drum was hopping away from him."

Watts and Starr stepped up to hold down the bass drum down for Bonham as he played. "You think, 'Ah, man! That would have been a great little video, a TikTok or a photo [that] would have gone worldwide!'" Starr said. "But in the ‘70s, I had parties, and you’ll never find any photos because I wouldn’t let you take photos, you know, in my house. But I always think, That would have been a great shot to have."

In a 2005 interview with Rolling Stone, Watts cited Bonham as an example of how the dynamic of close-knit rock bands can shift dramatically depending on the drummer. Even so, replacements don't necessarily spell the end of a group, he said. When asked if he could imagine the Stones continuing to play without him one day, he said yes, "if Mick [Jagger] and Keith [Richards] wanted to do it."

"There’s no reason why they shouldn’t, if people turn up to see them," Watts, who died last month, said. "The greatest thing, I suppose, is the combination of the four of us. The Stones is that. Technical ability is another thing. It’s like the Who. They’ve had some fine drummers. They’ve got one now — Ringo Starr’s son Zak. He’s great. He’s not Keith Moon. That was a personality. Pete Townshend and Keith — they were fantastically mad, the pair of them, onstage. John Bonham was the same with Led Zeppelin — it was a sound, thunderous."

Starr recalled his relationship with Watts fondly, noting he was a "great guy" and "a lot of fun." The pair lived near each other in London and would occasionally run into one another at events. "He had a harder band than I did to keep together," Starr said. "He was a beautiful human being. He was like the quiet man."

Change the World, Starr's new EP, will be released Friday and includes cameos by Joe WalshToto members Joseph Williams and Steve Lukather, Linda Perry, Trombone Shorty and others. "Though I’m making the EP for me, I get to play with all of these different people and have a lot of fun," Starr said of the project. "I’m not here to be tortured. I’m here to have fun and play with good musicians and hang. That’s what it is."

How the new 'Wonder Years' captured the spirit of the original — and why it's not a remake

Yahoo Entertainment 22 September, 2021 - 12:30pm

"I stayed in an all-Black dorm at MIT, and I'm not sure we were the demographic you would have envisioned for that show," Patterson says with a laugh. "But it meant something to all of us because of the emotions involved. That speaks to how that show cut across so many different demos."

It also speaks to The Wonder Years' powerful approach to its coming-of-age story, which followed the 1960s adolescence of Kevin Arnold (Fred Savage) with a poignant mixture of nostalgia, wistfulness, and wry hindsight (courtesy of narration by Daniel Stern, as the adult Kevin).

"The thing that was so special about the show, and more broadly, about that time in your life, is that it was a very finite period of time that you can't revisit — this time of innocence and waking up to the world," muses Savage. "It only exists in this haze of memory and nostalgia to each one of us." That's why he always resisted the idea of rebooting the series, he adds: "I felt like to revisit those characters was antithetical not just to the show, but to that time in all of our lives."

"We've seen a lot of stories about the struggle of Black people during that time," says Patterson, "and those stories are important and necessary and needed. But what we haven't seen as much is the point of view of the Black middle class during that time, to see how the concept of the American Dream applied to them."

The new Wonder Years, debuting Wednesday on ABC, follows 12-year-old Dean Williams (Elisha "EJ" Williams) growing up in 1968 Montgomery. Patterson, who serves as showrunner, calls the series a "reimagining" of the original, or "a parallel story that also exists in the Wonder Years universe."

"People should not expect it to feel like a remake or reboot," he explains.

Still, the new series has a familiar flavor, as Patterson and his creative team strove to capture the original show's spirit while forging a new path for themselves. Like Kevin, Dean lives with his family (played by Dulé Hill, Saycon Sengbloh, and Laura Kariuki) in the suburbs, and struggles with the turbulent era he's coming of age in, as well as everyday adolescent challenges like school, bullies, and romance. And of course, his experiences are also narrated by his older self, with the voice of Don Cheadle.

"Dean's so relatable to me," says Williams, who won the role of Dean after an extensive national casting search. (His previous credits include the Nickelodeon series Henry Danger and Danger Force.) "I've mainly been doing it by just keeping it natural. And watching the old show definitely helped a lot with my comedic timing."

He also got an assist from someone who knows what it's like to carry a TV show at 12 years old. Savage came on board at Patterson's request to executive produce the series and direct the pilot, contributing both his plentiful experience directing television (Savage has helmed dozens of episodes for such shows as Modern Family and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and his firsthand knowledge of how The Wonder Years pulled off its tonal balancing act.

"Fred is our EJ whisperer," Patterson says. "He knows the language to use for a 12-year-old to tap into to be able to carry the show on his shoulders."

Recalls Williams, "One thing he always tells me is, when you're doing the scene, make sure it's through your eyes. Because eyes can tell a lot of story; you can sell fear in your eyes, you can sell energy in your eyes. That definitely helps."

He adds, "A lot of people ask how Black people can look back at the late '60s with nostalgia. The reality is, we have nostalgia because of the resilience of the Black family, because of the fortitude that we've had to develop as Black people. And what we really want to tap into is those universal feelings about growing up. There's something about human nature where we look back to those formative years of adolescence, regardless of what happened, and still find moments of joy and happiness. Our show is going to show those moments, but not pretend like the moments of sadness, frustration, disappointment, and discouragement didn't exist."

Adds Savage, "We want to keep that same sense of nostalgia and warmth, of optimism and joy, but also that sense of how you feel when your heart gets broken for the first time, or when you see your parents as actual human beings for the first time. We want to really toe that line between comedy and drama that I think the original did so well."

But again: Don't call it a remake. "I felt like we were in familiar territory," Savage says, "but it didn't feel like déjà vu. It felt like we were building something brand new."

The Wonder Years premieres Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on ABC.

This reimagining of the classic coming-of-age series follows young Dean Williams growing up in a middle-class Black family in 1960s Montgomery, Ala.

How the new 'Wonder Years' captured the spirit of the original — and why it's not a remake

TMZ 22 September, 2021 - 12:30pm

"I stayed in an all-Black dorm at MIT, and I'm not sure we were the demographic you would have envisioned for that show," Patterson says with a laugh. "But it meant something to all of us because of the emotions involved. That speaks to how that show cut across so many different demos."

It also speaks to The Wonder Years' powerful approach to its coming-of-age story, which followed the 1960s adolescence of Kevin Arnold (Fred Savage) with a poignant mixture of nostalgia, wistfulness, and wry hindsight (courtesy of narration by Daniel Stern, as the adult Kevin).

"The thing that was so special about the show, and more broadly, about that time in your life, is that it was a very finite period of time that you can't revisit — this time of innocence and waking up to the world," muses Savage. "It only exists in this haze of memory and nostalgia to each one of us." That's why he always resisted the idea of rebooting the series, he adds: "I felt like to revisit those characters was antithetical not just to the show, but to that time in all of our lives."

"We've seen a lot of stories about the struggle of Black people during that time," says Patterson, "and those stories are important and necessary and needed. But what we haven't seen as much is the point of view of the Black middle class during that time, to see how the concept of the American Dream applied to them."

The new Wonder Years, debuting Wednesday on ABC, follows 12-year-old Dean Williams (Elisha "EJ" Williams) growing up in 1968 Montgomery. Patterson, who serves as showrunner, calls the series a "reimagining" of the original, or "a parallel story that also exists in the Wonder Years universe."

"People should not expect it to feel like a remake or reboot," he explains.

Still, the new series has a familiar flavor, as Patterson and his creative team strove to capture the original show's spirit while forging a new path for themselves. Like Kevin, Dean lives with his family (played by Dulé Hill, Saycon Sengbloh, and Laura Kariuki) in the suburbs, and struggles with the turbulent era he's coming of age in, as well as everyday adolescent challenges like school, bullies, and romance. And of course, his experiences are also narrated by his older self, with the voice of Don Cheadle.

"Dean's so relatable to me," says Williams, who won the role of Dean after an extensive national casting search. (His previous credits include the Nickelodeon series Henry Danger and Danger Force.) "I've mainly been doing it by just keeping it natural. And watching the old show definitely helped a lot with my comedic timing."

He also got an assist from someone who knows what it's like to carry a TV show at 12 years old. Savage came on board at Patterson's request to executive produce the series and direct the pilot, contributing both his plentiful experience directing television (Savage has helmed dozens of episodes for such shows as Modern Family and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia) and his firsthand knowledge of how The Wonder Years pulled off its tonal balancing act.

"Fred is our EJ whisperer," Patterson says. "He knows the language to use for a 12-year-old to tap into to be able to carry the show on his shoulders."

Recalls Williams, "One thing he always tells me is, when you're doing the scene, make sure it's through your eyes. Because eyes can tell a lot of story; you can sell fear in your eyes, you can sell energy in your eyes. That definitely helps."

He adds, "A lot of people ask how Black people can look back at the late '60s with nostalgia. The reality is, we have nostalgia because of the resilience of the Black family, because of the fortitude that we've had to develop as Black people. And what we really want to tap into is those universal feelings about growing up. There's something about human nature where we look back to those formative years of adolescence, regardless of what happened, and still find moments of joy and happiness. Our show is going to show those moments, but not pretend like the moments of sadness, frustration, disappointment, and discouragement didn't exist."

Adds Savage, "We want to keep that same sense of nostalgia and warmth, of optimism and joy, but also that sense of how you feel when your heart gets broken for the first time, or when you see your parents as actual human beings for the first time. We want to really toe that line between comedy and drama that I think the original did so well."

But again: Don't call it a remake. "I felt like we were in familiar territory," Savage says, "but it didn't feel like déjà vu. It felt like we were building something brand new."

The Wonder Years premieres Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on ABC.

This reimagining of the classic coming-of-age series follows young Dean Williams growing up in a middle-class Black family in 1960s Montgomery, Ala.

Rolling Stones resume live shows with emotional Charlie Watts tribute

BBC News 22 September, 2021 - 03:21am

The small warm-up show took place in Massachusetts Gillette Stadium, to an audience of about 300 people.

Singer Sir Mick Jagger dedicated the show to Watts, who died of an unspecified illness at the age of 80.

"It's a bit of a poignant night for us because its the first tour in 59 years that we've done without our lovely Charlie Watts," he said.

"We all miss Charlie so much. We miss him as a band, we miss him as friends - on and off the stage.

"We've got so many memories of Charlie, and I'm sure some of you that have seen us before have got memories of Charlie as well. And I hope you remember him like we do."

The star led the crowd in a chant of Watts' name before taking a celebratory swig of beer. Guitarist Ronnie Wood then took the microphone and declared: "Charlie, we're praying for you and playing for you."

The Stones were joined on drums by Steve Jordan, a session musician who has worked with the band since the 1980s. He had been announced as a stand-in for Watts for their forthcoming US tour before his death, as the drummer recovered from a medical procedure.

Monday's invitation-only show featured 15 songs, opening with Let's Spend the Night Together before running through hits like Tumbling Dice, 19th Nervous Breakdown and (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction.

They also covered the Chi-Lites' Troubles A-Comin' and played their 2020 single Living In A Ghost Town live for the first time.

The show was held in a tent-like structure set up on the stadium field, which is normally home to The New England Patriots.

It was organised by Patriots' owner Robert Kraft, and the guest list included Governor of Massachusetts Charlie Baker, J Geils Band singer Peter Wolf and Moderna chairman Noubar Afeyan - all of whom had to show proof of vaccination to attend.

The Stones had been rehearsing in Boston over the summer and, due to pandemic-related travel restrictions, were unable to attend Watts' funeral in England, The Sun reported earlier this month.

They paid tribute to the musician online, with guitarist Keith Richards calling him "the coolest guy I know". Mick Jagger simply shared a photograph of Watts smiling while seated behind his drum kit.

Watts had been a member of the Stones since 1963, and helped them become one of rock's biggest bands, scoring hits like Jumpin' Jack Flash, Get Off My Cloud and Sympathy for the Devil.

The deal caused outrage in France, which lost a contract to build submarines for Australia.

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