Russian Doping At The Olympics Remains A Question At The Games : Live Updates: The Tokyo Olympics

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NPR 04 August, 2021 - 06:31am 23 views

What is the Russian Olympic Committee?

The “ROC,” or “Russian Olympic Committee,” is a group of athletes from Russia who are allowed to compete under this special designation because their country is banned due to a “state-sponsored doping program.” nj.comTokyo Olympics: Why is Russia called ‘ROC’?

TOKYO — Traditionally, doping at the Olympics has been an uncomfortable companion to the Games' soaring athletic achievements.

In Tokyo, it hasn't been the issue it often is, because of concerns about the coronavirus pandemic.

But it's still there, along with a Russian team that's come to embody doping controversy.

There's a joke that's been going around at these Olympics – when has there ever been so much talk about positive tests, and not have it be about performance enhancing drugs?

Yes the coronavirus shoved doping to the side.

Or at least it did, until U.S. swimmer Ryan Murphy finished second to Russian Evgeny Rylov in the men's 200 meter backstroke.

"I don't know if [the race] was 100 percent clean," Murphy said at a press conference afterwards, "and that's because of things that happened over the past."

His doping suspicion could've been based on a number of things over the past.

In 2016, the revelation that Russia had been running a state-sponsored doping system, which Russia has always denied.

Also in 2016, a widespread drug testing failure, not just in Russia, before the Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, says the failure happened in ten sports considered high risk for doping. Including swimming and track and field.

"In those high risk sports alone," Tygart said, "there were 1,913 athletes who had no tests in the months leading into the Rio Olympic Games."

That's significant he says, because most doping happens before a big event, like the Olympics.

"At least six months before a major competition," Tygart said, "you have to have robust out-of-competition testing because that's the time period when athletes will use Human Growth Hormone or EPO or other steroids that will be out of [their] system when [they] show up at the Games and [they'll] test negative at the Games. But you'll still have the benefit of those drugs that you used prior to the Games. So it's absolutely essential."

Pre-Tokyo, there was another failure, because of the pandemic.

"[In 2020] you had about a 45% reduction in [global] testing, according to WADA [World Anti-Doping Agency] statistics," he said. "In the first quarter of 2021, this year, you had a reduction of roughly 20%, according to WADA statistics."

In other words, there are plenty of reasons for athletes, like Ryan Murphy, to be suspicious.

In that post-race press conference, Murphy said he was expressing general concerns about doping, and wasn't directly accusing Rylov, who sat next to Murphy. Rylov was asked whether he felt like he was being accused of anything, and whether he used banned drugs.

"I have always been for clean competition," Rylov said through an interpreter, "I am always tested. So from [the] bottom of my heart, I am for clean sports."

But the fact is, his country is being punished for a third straight Olympics for being not clean.

And punished, critics say, is a relative term.

Russia technically is banned from the Tokyo Games for its years of breaking anti-doping rules. From the state-sponsored system to allegations the country more recently manipulated drug test results. As a result of the ban, Russian athletes, again, are supposed to compete as neutrals. At the 2018 Winter Games, they were Olympic Athletes from Russia. In Tokyo, they are competing for the Russian Olympic Committee, or ROC.

They can't fly the Russian flag or hear their anthem when they win gold.

But they found a stirring alternative.

The International Olympic Committee approved the use of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1, and it's getting some play.

As of Wednesday in Tokyo, the ROC had won 13 gold medals and was third in the overall medal standings. ROC winners are getting congratulatory tweets from Russian President Vladimir Putin.

And in response to Ryan Murphy and others renewing suspicions about Russia, the official ROC twitter account posted an uncompromising response.

"How unnerving our victories of individual colleagues in the shop are," the tweet said, in part. "Yes we are here at the Olympics. Absolutely right. Whether someone likes it or not. The old barrel organ started the song about Russian doping again. Someone is twisting the handle diligently. English-language propaganda, oozing verbal sweat in the Tokyo heat. Through the mouths of athletes offended by defeats."

USADA's Tygart says the bravado isn't surprising.

"Look it obviously shows what a joke the quote, unquote ban really has been," Tygart said. "Everyone knows [the ROC] is the Russian athletes and no change has been evidenced whatsoever coming out of Russia. And it only emboldens them to continue to deny and attack those who would want the rules to be enforced."

Tygart and other critics say much of the fault lies with the IOC and WADA.

"It's simply not fair to clean athletes who are being held to the highest standards, that the IOC and WADA continue to turn a blind eye," Tygart said.

Asked this week about Tygart's criticism, specifically that IOC and WADA leaders are attempting to "pull the wool over the world's eyes" by claiming Russia is banned, IOC spokesman Mark Adams didn't answer directly.

Tygart says Russia, with its power and money, is too big for the IOC to enforce meaningful punishment.

"Let's not forget," he said, "Russia put 50 plus billion dollars into the Sochi Olympic Games [in 2014] and they continue to put money into hosting international events across the board. And they have significant political leverage within the IOC in the International Federations movement. And [the IOC] doesn't want to take a hard stand because they're fearful of the backlash [from] the Russians. At the end of the day, in the eyes of the IOC and its limp leadership, [Russia] is simply too big to fail."

If real punishment were possible, Tygart believes it should not be against individual Russian athletes, but instead Russian leadership. Which he says should be transparent and publish drug test results as a way to start regaining the world's trust.

Short of that, he believes Russian and Olympic leaders are ready to ride out the Russian ban, which was reduced from four to two years.

It's scheduled to end in late 2022, meaning next February's Winter Games will be yet another Olympics of neutrality, and most likely, suspicion.

Read full article at NPR

Canadian Pamela Ware botches dive in spectacular fashion

Yahoo Canada Sports 04 August, 2021 - 02:22am

But Canadian diver Pamela Ware just reminded us that Olympians are mortals, after all.

Ware entered the 3-metre seminal at Tokyo 2020 in fourth place, but all hopes of a podium finish sank after the 28-year-old scored 0.0 on her final dive.

The Greenfield, Que., native ran up the plank, bounced twice, and just as she was about to spring into action… aborted mission.

Woke up and still can't get passed #PamelaWare epic fail. I feel soo bad for her😂😂😂 #diving #Olympics pic.twitter.com/26QLS8sZHZ

— Shaquille Omari (@shaq_omari) August 3, 2021

Despite the devastating result, the 2019 Pan American gold medalist kept a positive mindset, thanked fans for “beautiful messages of encouragement” and promised to come back stronger.

"I hope you guys are gonna get used to having me around because I’m not going anywhere. I’m not giving up. This competition doesn’t define me, and I’m not letting it defeat me."

Ware was right, it could have happened to anybody, and it actually did before she even failed that dive. Mexican Arantxa Chavez scored zero in the earlier preliminary round after messing up in nearly identical fashion.

Pamela Ware haciendo un homenaje a Arantxa Chávez#Respect 👏🏽 pic.twitter.com/tuKKxKkDqA

— milMASks ha volvido (@milfMASks) July 31, 2021

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Watch Canadian diver score 0.0 at Olympics as she jumps in pool feet first after pulling out of move over safety concern

The Sun 03 August, 2021 - 03:47pm

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CANADIAN diver Pamela Ware recorded a rare score of 0.0 to miss out on a spot in the Tokyo Olympics 3m springboard final.

The 28-year-old, who was making her debut at the Games, landed in the pool feet first after fears over injuring herself during her last attempt.

Ware took a misstep on her approach for a 3.5 difficulty dive and was forced to abandon her planned attempt the second she jumped.

As a result, the 2013 World Aquatics Championships bronze medalist performed a pencil jump straight into the pool and scored a 0.0.

Ware's lowly dive meant she exited the competition and she later admitted her fears that she would have ended up injured had she not pulled out.

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She told Canadian broadcaster CBC: “I think that if I would have done the dive, I could have possibly hurt myself.”

Ware later added in an Instagram video that she was still proud of her journey despite the mistakes she had made.

The diver said: “I am going to say that I am very proud of myself. Something really difficult.

“What you guys see in the competition is just a tiny factor of what we actually do to get to where we are.

“I was so ready for this competition, and I made a mistake.

“It could have happened to anybody, but it happened to me at the wrong time.

“But I am proud because I have done everything possible to make it to where I am and I’m human, I’m allowed to make mistakes.

“I hope you guys are gonna get used to having me around because I’m not going anywhere, I’m not giving up. This competition does not define me and I will not let it defeat me.”

Mexican diver Arantxa Chavez, 30, also scored 0.0 from the judges after she made a similar error during the preliminary round.

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Tokyo Olympics: Canadian Diver Pamela Ware Scores Rare 0.0 at Olympics After Landing Feet First

News18 03 August, 2021 - 10:17am

Athletes train all their lives for that one chance to represent their country and showcase their talent on the world stage during the Olympics. However, when the stage is bigger, even the smallest mistakes and accidents can overshadow your hard work for years. Something similar happened to Canadian Diver Pamela Ware who crashed out of the semifinal event at the Tokyo Olympics after a rare score of 0.0 in her last attempt at the semifinal event.

Pamela took a misstep while approaching for a 3.5 difficulty dive and was forced to abort her planned attempt the second she jumped. As a result, she landed in the pool on her feet and scored a rare 0.0 at the Olympics. Her low dive score eliminated her from the race to podium finish and she exited the tournament after this miscue.

Speaking to Canadian broadcaster CBC, the athlete said that had she gone for the dive, she would have ended up hurting herself. Pamela later posted an Instagram video thanking her fans for the support and said that she was proud of her journey despite the failure at Tokyo Olympics 2020.

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She started off the video by thanking her fans for their encouragement during this time and said that she was proud to have come some far. Overwhelmed by emotions, Pamela’s voice choked, and she added that what people see at the competition is only a fraction of the effort it takes to reach this point and she was completely ready for the big day. However, she made a mistake and that could have happened to anyone. She reemphasized fact that she was proud of her journey and hoped to make a comeback soon.

Pamela's video has so far got over 70 thousand views along with several comments on the platform. Her fans and fellow athletes expressed their solidarity with her and said that it was just bad luck, and she would soon make a comeback like a champion.

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

Tokyo Olympics: Canadian Diver Pamela Ware Scores Rare 0.0 at Olympics After Landing Feet First

New York Post 03 August, 2021 - 10:17am

Athletes train all their lives for that one chance to represent their country and showcase their talent on the world stage during the Olympics. However, when the stage is bigger, even the smallest mistakes and accidents can overshadow your hard work for years. Something similar happened to Canadian Diver Pamela Ware who crashed out of the semifinal event at the Tokyo Olympics after a rare score of 0.0 in her last attempt at the semifinal event.

Pamela took a misstep while approaching for a 3.5 difficulty dive and was forced to abort her planned attempt the second she jumped. As a result, she landed in the pool on her feet and scored a rare 0.0 at the Olympics. Her low dive score eliminated her from the race to podium finish and she exited the tournament after this miscue.

Speaking to Canadian broadcaster CBC, the athlete said that had she gone for the dive, she would have ended up hurting herself. Pamela later posted an Instagram video thanking her fans for the support and said that she was proud of her journey despite the failure at Tokyo Olympics 2020.

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She started off the video by thanking her fans for their encouragement during this time and said that she was proud to have come some far. Overwhelmed by emotions, Pamela’s voice choked, and she added that what people see at the competition is only a fraction of the effort it takes to reach this point and she was completely ready for the big day. However, she made a mistake and that could have happened to anyone. She reemphasized fact that she was proud of her journey and hoped to make a comeback soon.

Pamela's video has so far got over 70 thousand views along with several comments on the platform. Her fans and fellow athletes expressed their solidarity with her and said that it was just bad luck, and she would soon make a comeback like a champion.

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

Olympian Won't Be 'Defeated' by Zero-Scoring Failed Dive: 'I'm Allowed to Make Mistakes'

PEOPLE 03 August, 2021 - 09:52am

Canadian diver Pamela Ware didn't have the Tokyo Olympics she envisioned, but that hasn't stopped her from looking ahead to what's next.

On Saturday, Ware placed last in the semifinals of the women's 3m springboard event because while attempting her final dive, which was supposed to be her most difficult, she slipped and ended up too far forward on the board.

She aborted the attempt and went feet-first into the water. The judges awarded her zero points, drastically lowering her overall score.

"Honestly, I think I'm still in shock right now," Ware, 28, told reporters after. "I'm kind of emotionless, which is really weird for me because I usually act on my emotions really quickly. But I think that if I would have done the dive, I could have possibly hurt myself."

On Sunday, Ware grew visible emotional as she reflected on the end of her Games in a video on Instagram.

"I am very proud of myself. This has been really difficult," she said. "What you guys see in the competition is just a tiny factor of what we actually do to get to where we are."

"I was so ready for this competition and I made a mistake," Ware continued. "It could have happened to anybody but it happened to me at the wrong time. But I am proud because I have done everything possible to make it to where I am. And I'm human."

She said she was grateful for the widespread support: "so many beautiful messages of encouragement and I appreciate it so much."

And she said she had no plans to stop going for Olympic gold.

"I hope you guys are gonna get used to having me around, because I'm not going anywhere," she said.

"I'm not letting it defeat me."

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Olympian Won't Be 'Defeated' by Zero-Scoring Failed Dive: 'I'm Allowed to Make Mistakes'

Yahoo News 03 August, 2021 - 09:52am

Canadian diver Pamela Ware didn't have the Tokyo Olympics she envisioned, but that hasn't stopped her from looking ahead to what's next.

On Saturday, Ware placed last in the semifinals of the women's 3m springboard event because while attempting her final dive, which was supposed to be her most difficult, she slipped and ended up too far forward on the board.

She aborted the attempt and went feet-first into the water. The judges awarded her zero points, drastically lowering her overall score.

"Honestly, I think I'm still in shock right now," Ware, 28, told reporters after. "I'm kind of emotionless, which is really weird for me because I usually act on my emotions really quickly. But I think that if I would have done the dive, I could have possibly hurt myself."

On Sunday, Ware grew visible emotional as she reflected on the end of her Games in a video on Instagram.

"I am very proud of myself. This has been really difficult," she said. "What you guys see in the competition is just a tiny factor of what we actually do to get to where we are."

"I was so ready for this competition and I made a mistake," Ware continued. "It could have happened to anybody but it happened to me at the wrong time. But I am proud because I have done everything possible to make it to where I am. And I'm human."

She said she was grateful for the widespread support: "so many beautiful messages of encouragement and I appreciate it so much."

And she said she had no plans to stop going for Olympic gold.

"I hope you guys are gonna get used to having me around, because I'm not going anywhere," she said.

"I'm not letting it defeat me."

Get celebrity and royals news plus human interest stories delivered straight to your in-box

Canadian diver scores a 0 with a feetfirst flop at Tokyo Olympics

Yahoo News 02 August, 2021 - 10:46am

"I am proud because I have done everything possible to make it to where I am," Pamela Ware said after she competed. "And I'm human"

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Ken Terauchi climbed out of the water after his last dive and bowed, soaking up a standing ovation. The Japanese diver didn't win a medal at his home Olympics, but he did make the final of the men's 3-meter springboard in his sixth Games. Four days shy of his 41st birthday, Terauchi finished last among 12 divers on Tuesday.

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