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E! News 30 August, 2021 - 12:37pm 4 views

When is only murders in the building coming out?

“Only Murders in the Building” premieres Aug. 31 on Hulu. Variety‘Only Murders in the Building’ Lets Selena Gomez, Steve Martin, Martin Short Make True Crime Charming: TV Review

Only Murders in the Building Is a Joyful True-Crime Parody Romp

Vulture 31 August, 2021 - 08:10am

Wouldn’t it be fun to do a TV show send-up of true-crime podcasts? Wouldn’t it be fun to write a role for Martin Short where he gets to play to all of his biggest, silliest impulses but also gets to show his rarer poignant side? Hey, wouldn’t it be fun to do it classic whodunit style, with everything centered on a big, stodgy Upper East Side apartment building? (You could get a bunch of Broadway actors to show up as small characters; wouldn’t that be fun?) What if it juggled different narrators for each episode? What if there were a bassoonist played by Amy Ryan, and what if, for some reason, Sting showed up! What if you, Steve Martin, the creator of this show, also starred in it? What if you also get Selena Gomez to star in it! Does that make sense? Is that going to work? Unclear, but wouldn’t it be fun to try?

If you were to lay it out point by point and try to pin it all to a big wall, or stretch it out and plumb its anatomy for how it all fits together, you’d quickly discover that very little about Only Murders makes much sense. It’s true for the show’s internal mechanics — the mystery and the parodic podcast telling of it are full of absurdities and improbabilities and outright shrugs — and it’s also true for the meta-level concept of the show. Gomez is an odd fit as Mabel, a mysterious resident of the show’s titular building, but there’s pleasure in watching her clash against the show’s broader style; she’s destabilizing as one part of a triad where Steve Martin and Martin Short are the other two members. But eight episodes into the ten-episode season (the number of screeners sent to critics), I still hadn’t adjusted to the rhythmic differences between her performance and that of her co-stars. Only Murders tries to write its way through that problem: It’s generational! They come from different worlds! But the show never figures out how to integrate the stylistic glossiness and emotional bluntness of the Mabel sections with the rest of the series, which is all comic lightness and sharp, quiet moments of sadness.

In some ways, for some episodes and scenes, it just doesn’t work. And yet the spirit that seems to be animating everything in the series — don’t you think it’d be fun to try, though? — pulses through it all anyhow, as though Martin and the show’s other creator John Hoffman are sitting next to you on the sofa, smiling at the mismatched performance styles and enjoying themselves immensely.

It doesn’t hurt that there’s a rollicking quality to the whole thing, a playful energy that seeps into everything from the set designs to the casting to the chemistry between longtime creative partners Martin and Short. Martin’s character Charles is an actor who once starred in Brazzos, a crime procedural where he played a daring, jaded detective (named Brazzos, of course). There’s so much delight in all the goofy Brazzos stuff: the old re-created clips from this fictional show, Brazzos’s terrible tagline, Charles’s half-resigned, half-proud expression whenever someone recognizes him. Short’s character Oliver, a theater producer who hasn’t had a successful show in years, is a magnet for silly-sad Broadway in-jokes. Every ounce of it is “wouldn’t it be fun if …?,” followed by a string of ever-heightening descriptions of failed Broadway productions, all of it magnified by Nathan Lane, who plays another resident of the building who often funds Oliver’s productions.

It’d be pretty easy to fall into a trap of plausibility, to get caught on the impossible logistics of these three people actually producing a podcast under these conditions, or stuck on working out the unlikely events of the crime itself. That sort of thinking, applied to a show like this, is a route to frustration. Only Murders wants its viewers to really feel for its characters, but to treat all their surrounding true-crime paraphernalia like an elaborate, almost clownish Pink Panther–style setpiece. From that perspective, Only Murders absolutely achieves its goals, and the pleasure its creators seem to take in making it translates effectively into the experience of watching it. Effectively, but not effortlessly — you can still sense the moments where Only Murders works better in concept than in execution, the places it leaps and then lands with a bit of a wobble. But its flaws do not make it any less charming. For a show that seems born out of the spirit of “wouldn’t it be fun?”, the answer is clearly “yes.”

Steve Martin defends Selena Gomez following "ominous headlines"

Digital Spy 31 August, 2021 - 08:10am

Wouldn’t it be fun to do a TV show send-up of true-crime podcasts? Wouldn’t it be fun to write a role for Martin Short where he gets to play to all of his biggest, silliest impulses but also gets to show his rarer poignant side? Hey, wouldn’t it be fun to do it classic whodunit style, with everything centered on a big, stodgy Upper East Side apartment building? (You could get a bunch of Broadway actors to show up as small characters; wouldn’t that be fun?) What if it juggled different narrators for each episode? What if there were a bassoonist played by Amy Ryan, and what if, for some reason, Sting showed up! What if you, Steve Martin, the creator of this show, also starred in it? What if you also get Selena Gomez to star in it! Does that make sense? Is that going to work? Unclear, but wouldn’t it be fun to try?

If you were to lay it out point by point and try to pin it all to a big wall, or stretch it out and plumb its anatomy for how it all fits together, you’d quickly discover that very little about Only Murders makes much sense. It’s true for the show’s internal mechanics — the mystery and the parodic podcast telling of it are full of absurdities and improbabilities and outright shrugs — and it’s also true for the meta-level concept of the show. Gomez is an odd fit as Mabel, a mysterious resident of the show’s titular building, but there’s pleasure in watching her clash against the show’s broader style; she’s destabilizing as one part of a triad where Steve Martin and Martin Short are the other two members. But eight episodes into the ten-episode season (the number of screeners sent to critics), I still hadn’t adjusted to the rhythmic differences between her performance and that of her co-stars. Only Murders tries to write its way through that problem: It’s generational! They come from different worlds! But the show never figures out how to integrate the stylistic glossiness and emotional bluntness of the Mabel sections with the rest of the series, which is all comic lightness and sharp, quiet moments of sadness.

In some ways, for some episodes and scenes, it just doesn’t work. And yet the spirit that seems to be animating everything in the series — don’t you think it’d be fun to try, though? — pulses through it all anyhow, as though Martin and the show’s other creator John Hoffman are sitting next to you on the sofa, smiling at the mismatched performance styles and enjoying themselves immensely.

It doesn’t hurt that there’s a rollicking quality to the whole thing, a playful energy that seeps into everything from the set designs to the casting to the chemistry between longtime creative partners Martin and Short. Martin’s character Charles is an actor who once starred in Brazzos, a crime procedural where he played a daring, jaded detective (named Brazzos, of course). There’s so much delight in all the goofy Brazzos stuff: the old re-created clips from this fictional show, Brazzos’s terrible tagline, Charles’s half-resigned, half-proud expression whenever someone recognizes him. Short’s character Oliver, a theater producer who hasn’t had a successful show in years, is a magnet for silly-sad Broadway in-jokes. Every ounce of it is “wouldn’t it be fun if …?,” followed by a string of ever-heightening descriptions of failed Broadway productions, all of it magnified by Nathan Lane, who plays another resident of the building who often funds Oliver’s productions.

It’d be pretty easy to fall into a trap of plausibility, to get caught on the impossible logistics of these three people actually producing a podcast under these conditions, or stuck on working out the unlikely events of the crime itself. That sort of thinking, applied to a show like this, is a route to frustration. Only Murders wants its viewers to really feel for its characters, but to treat all their surrounding true-crime paraphernalia like an elaborate, almost clownish Pink Panther–style setpiece. From that perspective, Only Murders absolutely achieves its goals, and the pleasure its creators seem to take in making it translates effectively into the experience of watching it. Effectively, but not effortlessly — you can still sense the moments where Only Murders works better in concept than in execution, the places it leaps and then lands with a bit of a wobble. But its flaws do not make it any less charming. For a show that seems born out of the spirit of “wouldn’t it be fun?”, the answer is clearly “yes.”

'Only Murders in the Building' Season 1: How Many Episodes Is It? Will There Be a Season 2?

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 30 August, 2021 - 09:10pm

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If you’ve seen a preview or commercial for the show, you may be wondering how long it will last. Let’s take a closer look at how many episodes Only Murders in the Building Season 1 is, as well as whether there will be a second season. 

With the popularity of true crime and investigation TV shows and podcasts, there’s never been a better time to put out a show centering on a murder mystery. That’s what this show will do, putting a comedic spin on a popular genre. 

Martin co-created the show alongside John Hoffman. It’s a series about three people who live in the same building but don’t know each other. After connecting over their love of true crime, they actually get involved in one as one of their neighbors is murdered in their New York City apartment building. It’s up to them to solve the case. It’s reported as a suicide by police, but they suspect foul play. 

Martin and Short are no stranger to each other in real life, as the pair have teamed up for many projects over the years. Selena Gomez is the newcomer to this group, adding a youthful perspective to the proceedings. It’s an interesting combination of talent, and it looks promising. The show debuts on August 31, 2021, on Hulu. 

According to Entertainment Weekly, Only Murders in the Building Season 1 includes 10 episodes. The show has a star-studded supporting cast to go along with its main trio: Nathan Lane, Aaron Dominguez, Amy Ryan, and the singer Sting appear as well. 

The show is a testament to New York apartment life — putting dozens of people on top of each other while still finding a way to keep them lonely and isolated. The three main characters bond over a common love — true crime — which drives them to attempt to solve a murder over the course of 10 episodes.

The juxtaposition between Gomez’s youthful attitude and Martin and Short’s older sensibilities gives way to plenty of laughs. Though Gomez teaming up with Short and Martin may surprise some, that’s part of what makes the grouping so fun. 

So what can viewers expect from the show? Critics were given the first eight episodes to screen. Here are their titles:

As for Only Murders in the Building Season 2, there’s been no word of that yet. Hulu hasn’t made an announcement regarding a possible renewal. If the show is popular, however, there’s likely to be another season. Gomez, Short, and Martin seem to have great chemistry during interviews and in trailers for the show. If they have even a portion of that chemistry in the actual series, it’s likely to be something fans want to see more of. 

If you’ve seen a preview or commercial for the show, you may be wondering how long it will last. Let’s take a closer look at how many episodes Only Murders in the Building Season 1 is, as well as whether there will be a second season. 

With the popularity of true crime and investigation TV shows and podcasts, there’s never been a better time to put out a show centering on a murder mystery. That’s what this show will do, putting a comedic spin on a popular genre. 

Martin co-created the show alongside John Hoffman. It’s a series about three people who live in the same building but don’t know each other. After connecting over their love of true crime, they actually get involved in one as one of their neighbors is murdered in their New York City apartment building. It’s up to them to solve the case. It’s reported as a suicide by police, but they suspect foul play. 

Martin and Short are no stranger to each other in real life, as the pair have teamed up for many projects over the years. Selena Gomez is the newcomer to this group, adding a youthful perspective to the proceedings. It’s an interesting combination of talent, and it looks promising. The show debuts on August 31, 2021, on Hulu. 

According to Entertainment Weekly, Only Murders in the Building Season 1 includes 10 episodes. The show has a star-studded supporting cast to go along with its main trio: Nathan Lane, Aaron Dominguez, Amy Ryan, and the singer Sting appear as well. 

The show is a testament to New York apartment life — putting dozens of people on top of each other while still finding a way to keep them lonely and isolated. The three main characters bond over a common love — true crime — which drives them to attempt to solve a murder over the course of 10 episodes.

The juxtaposition between Gomez’s youthful attitude and Martin and Short’s older sensibilities gives way to plenty of laughs. Though Gomez teaming up with Short and Martin may surprise some, that’s part of what makes the grouping so fun. 

So what can viewers expect from the show? Critics were given the first eight episodes to screen. Here are their titles:

As for Only Murders in the Building Season 2, there’s been no word of that yet. Hulu hasn’t made an announcement regarding a possible renewal. If the show is popular, however, there’s likely to be another season. Gomez, Short, and Martin seem to have great chemistry during interviews and in trailers for the show. If they have even a portion of that chemistry in the actual series, it’s likely to be something fans want to see more of. 

A Generational-Divide Comedy That’s Also a Crime Story

The Atlantic 30 August, 2021 - 02:30pm

Steve Martin and Martin Short’s rapport isn’t that of a comedic partnership so much as that of a musical duo. Since their first collaboration more than 30 years ago in Three Amigos, they have developed a natural rhythm: Martin is the straight man with a wise-ass streak; Short produces over-the-top characters with wild facial contortions. Martin gets the audience to laugh with him; Short, to laugh at him. Theirs is a harmony that comedians often dream of developing but rarely achieve.

In their latest arrangement, the 10-episode series Only Murders in the Building, the pair revisit that familiar tempo, this time as true-crime-podcast-obsessed Manhattanites investigating a death in their tony apartment complex for their own podcast. Martin—in his first regular TV role since the 1970s—stars as Charles, an unemployed actor who still recites lines from the cheesy cop show he once anchored. Short plays Oliver, a theater director whose career is floundering after an ill-advised attempt at making Splash: The Musical. Two fame-adjacent has-beens bumbling around at a crime scene would have probably been enough for an appealingly kooky show. But in Only Murders, which starts streaming tomorrow on Hulu, Martin and Short remix their dynamic with an unexpected third party: the pop star and former Disney Channel mainstay Selena Gomez.

The addition of Gomez—who plays Mabel, a sardonic artist and fellow tenant with a shared podcast obsession—might seem discordant. Yet in pitting Martin and Short’s established routine opposite her wild-card casting, the show evolves from a straightforward parody of true-crime podcasts and their devoted listeners into a goofy yet endearing examination of the generational divide. Oliver still calls the internet the “World Wide Web.” Charles believes that it’s possible to “check all the websites” for clues. Mabel thinks that Sting—another denizen of their building, and at one point a hilariously unsuspecting suspect—is a member of U2. Somehow, these three will solve a crime.

But Only Murders is more than just quippy one-liners demonstrating the obvious knowledge gaps between people born decades apart. Instead, Martin and his co-creator, John Hoffman (Grace and Frankie), mine comedy from the blind spots and insecurities shared by two generations so prone to blaming each other for cultural angst. Charles, Oliver, and Mabel are all supremely confident that they know what’s best for their investigation, and for one another. Despite living in the same luxury apartment building, they all think they’re in touch with the gritty reality of New York. And as much as they hate to admit it, they’re all lonely and searching for direction. Early episodes emphasize each character’s melancholy: Charles, a hopeless romantic, plays the concertina for a neighbor across the courtyard rather than asking her out. Oliver’s odd mannerisms—he only ever eats dip, for example—mask his desperation as he drowns in debt. And Mabel’s deadpan humor belies how vulnerable she feels living alone in the city.

Like previous shows that used crime as a backdrop for comedy about a community’s eccentric inhabitants—such as the gone-too-soon NBC series Trial & Error and the late-’80s Tom Hanks starrer The ’Burbs—the mystery merely simmers in the background, with key plot twists doled out at a satisfying pace. This leaves room for the characters’ bigger challenge: learning to work together. Though Charles and Oliver quickly find common ground in how little they understand Mabel’s Millennial habits—“calls bother them for some reason,” Oliver gripes when the two have to text her—the three don’t make the most amicable team. They initially distrust one another. Mabel realizes that Charles often recites his old show’s dialogue rather than speaking his mind. Oliver’s cagey about his finances, and Charles finds his name-dropping, know-it-all ways irksome. The detective work is satisfying, but watching the investigation force the characters to reveal themselves and build an unanticipated bond is the real reward.

If this is starting to sound too saccharine, don’t worry—there’s still a case to crack. An old-school silliness infuses the trio’s investigative antics. They dig through the trash for clues, stop for a pretzel while tailing a suspect during rush hour, and, of course, accuse the rock god Sting of murder. But at the same time, Only Murders doesn’t excuse the exploitative choice to record a podcast about a neighbor’s death. The show, through episodes featuring the perspectives of other building residents, repeatedly questions the main characters’ voyeuristic ambitions. Why would three people with no interest in one another want to spend so much time together, gathering evidence for a podcast that gets roughly a dozen listeners at most?

The answer, it turns out, harkens back to why Martin, Short, and the show’s producers recruited Gomez in the first place. Charles, Oliver, and Mabel—two Boomers and a Millennial—are all trying to prove their own hypotheses about the crime, even if it means making the murder about them. This self-centeredness mirrors what every generational divide truly amounts to: a hubristic inclination to trust oneself (and one’s own age group) over anyone else. To Martin and Short, there’s something funny about that cycle of inherent mistrust, enough for them to shake up their typical double act.

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