Seriously, Get Rid of These Recalled Brands of Dog Food Right Now

Business

Lifehacker 19 August, 2021 - 03:30pm 11 views

What dog food does Midwestern Pet Foods make?

9634 Hedden Rd. Earthborn Holistic from Midwestern Pet Foods Inc. is a dog food line combining proteins, fruits, vegetables, vitamins and minerals selected to support immunity and wellness. Five formulas are available: Adult Vantage, Ocean Fusion, Puppy Vantage, Small Breed and Primitive Natural. petfoodindustry.comMidwestern Pet Foods Inc. Earthborn Holistic dog food

Read full article at Lifehacker

FDA: Dog Food Made in New York Led To Hundreds of Sick, Dead Dogs

Hudson Valley Post 21 August, 2021 - 11:10am

Warning: We have photos of over 60 different known dog foods sold in New York that the FDA believes has led to the "illness or death of hundreds of dogs."

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a corporate-wide warning letter to Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc. after inspections of its manufacturing sites revealed alleged violations of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that were shared across the sites.

"These conditions likely contributed to the illness or death of hundreds of dogs," the FDA states.

"We are issuing this corporate-wide warning letter because inspections of Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc.’s manufacturing plants revealed evidence of violations, which were shared across multiple plants and were associated with the illness or death of hundreds of pets who had eaten the company’s dry dog food," Director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine Steven M. Solomon stated.

The initial inspection of Midwestern’s Chickasha, Oklahoma plant was triggered by reports of illness or death in dogs that had eaten SPORTMiX brand dry dog food manufactured by Midwestern. Samples of SPORTMiX were later found to contain levels of aflatoxin as high as 558 parts per billion. The FDA considers pet food to be contaminated if it contains more than 20 ppb of aflatoxin.

Aflatoxins are toxins produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus, which can grow on corn and other grains used as ingredients in pet food. At high levels, aflatoxins can cause illness and death in pets, officials say.

As of August 9, the FDA is aware of more than 130 pet deaths and more than 220 pet illnesses that may be linked to eating brands of pet food manufactured by Midwestern. Not all of these cases have been confirmed as aflatoxin poisoning through laboratory testing or veterinary record review. This count is approximate and may not reflect the total number of pets affected, officials say.

After inspecting Midwestern’s Chickasha plant, the FDA also inspected the company’s three other manufacturing plants. These inspections revealed evidence of significant violations of the Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals regulation.

FDA inspectors found salmonella and toxic levels of aflatoxin at four Midwestern Pet Foods, including at a plant in Waverly, New York.

In January, the company voluntarily recalled these products, as well as all corn-containing pet foods manufactured at its Chickasha plant. In March, Midwestern recalled several brands of pet food manufactured at its Monmouth, Illinois plant after samples tested positive for Salmonella. The FDA found that Midwestern’s food safety program appears inadequate to significantly minimize or prevent Salmonella in its pet food. None of the recalled products should be available to consumers to purchase.

A complete list of the products recalled by Midwestern can be found in the photos below:

FDA warns of ‘hundreds of deaths,’ illness linked to company’s pet food

WSB Atlanta 21 August, 2021 - 11:10am

A letter, sent by the agency to the company on Tuesday, warned that inspections of the company’s manufacturing plants have shown evidence of violations.

“The FDA is dedicated to taking all steps possible to help pet owners have confidence that the food they buy for their animal companions is safe and wholesome,” Steven Solomon, director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said in a statement. “Samples of dog food were found to contain high levels of aflatoxin.”

Aflatoxin is a byproduct of mold that can grow on pet food ingredients such as corn and other grains. According to the FDA, at high levels, “aflatoxins can cause illness (aflatoxicosis), liver damage, and death in pets. The toxins can be present even if there is no visible mold on the pet food.”

The FDA issued a warning in December 2020 that consumers had reported deaths and illness from aflatoxin after their pets ate food manufactured at a Midwestern Pet Foods plant.

The agency said that of Aug. 9 it had received more than 130 reports of pet deaths and more than 220 reports of pets becoming ill after eating pet food that may be linked to food manufactured by Midwestern.

Not all of the cases have been confirmed as aflatoxin poisoning through laboratory testing or veterinary record review, the FDA noted.

Pets that have aflatoxin poisoning may exhibit the following symptoms:

Jaundice (a yellowish tint to the skin, eyes or gums due to liver damage).

FDA Issues Warning About Illnesses, Deaths Linked to Midwestern Pet Foods

WebMD 21 August, 2021 - 11:10am

Aug. 19, 2021 -- The FDA issued a public warning on Tuesday about contaminated pet food sold by Midwestern Pet Foods, which could be linked with more than 220 illnesses and 130 deaths among dogs and cats.

During an inspection of the company’s manufacturing plant in Chickasha, OK, the FDA found that samples of SPORTMiX High Energy Dog Food contained high levels of aflatoxin, which is produced by mold and can grow on grains used in pet food. High levels of aflatoxin can cause illness and death in pets.

After inspecting the Chickasha plant, the FDA also inspected the company’s other manufacturing plants in New York, Indiana, and Illinois, which showed evidence of issues across all the sites. The FDA issued a warning letter to the company last week that requested a response within 15 working days stating the specific steps taken to correct the problems.

“We are issuing this corporate-wide warning letter because inspections of Midwestern Pet Foods, Inc.’s manufacturing plants revealed evidence of violations, which were shared across multiple plants and were associated with the illness or death of hundreds of pets who had eaten the company’s dry dog food,” Steven Solomon, DVM, director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said in a statement.

“It is imperative that manufacturers and distributors of pet foods understand their responsibility to comply with all requirements of federal law and FDA regulations,” he said.

Some samples of SPORTMiX-branded pet foods, which included multiple products and lot codes, contained levels of aflatoxin that were as high as 558 parts per billion. The FDA considers pet food to be tainted if it contains more than 20 parts per billion of aflatoxin.

In January, the company voluntarily recalled these products, the FDA said, as well as all corn-containing pet foods made at the Chickasha plant.

In March, the company also recalled several brands of pet food made in its plant in Monmouth, IL, after samples tested positive for salmonella, including some SPORTMiX and Earthborn cat foods.

“The FDA found that Midwestern’s food safety program appears inadequate to significantly minimize or prevent Salmonella in its pet food,” according to the FDA statement. “None of the recalled products should be available to consumers to purchase.”

As of Aug. 9, the FDA is aware of more than 220 illnesses and 130 deaths linked with brands of pet food manufactured by the company. Not all the cases have been confirmed as aflatoxin poisoning, which includes symptoms such as vomiting, jaundice, diarrhea, and loss of appetite.

If the FDA doesn’t receive a response from the company or see adequate action to address violations, Midwestern Pet Foods could face legal action, including product seizure.

“You are responsible for investigating and determining the causes of any violations and for preventing their recurrence or the occurrence of other violations,” the FDA wrote in the warning letter to the company.

FDA: “FDA Issues a Corporate-Wide Warning Letter to Company Associated with Contaminated Pet Food, Hundreds of Adverse Events,” “Warning Letter: Midwestern Pet Food,” Aug. 9, 2021.

© 2005 - 2019 WebMD LLC. All rights reserved.

WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

A rapid COVID-19 test manufacturer trashed millions of products early this summer because it thought the pandemic was wrapping up

The Seattle Times 20 August, 2021 - 12:00am

Workers at Abbott Laboratories, the manufacturer, were told in June and July to put the products in garbage bags after virus test sales dropped in the spring due to diminishing virus cases in the US, The Times reported. The company also ended supplier contracts and "shuttered" another plant in Illinois that makes the test, The Times reported.

According to The Times, a site manager told workers at the Maine facility: "The numbers are going down. This is all about money."

But now, demand for the 15-minute rapid antigen test, BinaxNOW, is surging as the Delta variant spreads across the US, the report said.

In an interview with the New York Times, an Abbott executive said the destroyed materials were "test cards" which had "limited shelf life."

However, The Times claims that a photo shows that an estimated 8.6 million Abbott test cards with expiration dates onward of seven months were shredded. 

"Since the onset of this pandemic, no company has made as many tests, as affordably, as Abbott," the company said in a statement to Insider. "We have not destroyed any finished BinaxNOW product, nor have we destroyed any usable test components needed by the market that could have been donated. In fact, because Abbott maintained usable test components, we're now able to scale up."

The company added in their statement that demand for tests diminished in May. "The lots of card components, shown in the photos in The New York Times article (143608R and 143467R), were at seven-month shelf life and were disposed of in accordance with our standard inventory management process," the company statement said.

The company also said that they stored "individual components" of the tests in the event they needed to ramp up test output.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there were 157,810 new cases on August 18. Healthline reports that cases in the past 2 weeks show the highest average since early February.

Business Stories