Shang-Chi could suffer because Marvel can’t push pause on its big story

Entertainment

The Verge 03 September, 2021 - 07:00am 18 views

Is there after credits in Shang Chi?

Like nearly all of its cinematic cousins in Marvel's back catalog, Shang-Chi also has two post-credits scenes. Historically, Marvel has deployed post-credits scenes as a way to tease upcoming films or possibly introduce new characters. VoxShang-Chi’s 2 post-credits scenes, explained

How many credit scenes in Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings?

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings features not one but two post-credits scenes. CNETShang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings post-credits scenes explained

How is Shang Chi related to Marvel?

Shang-Chi (/ˌʃɑːŋ ˈtʃiː/ SHAHNG-CHEE), also known as the Master of Kung Fu and Brother Hand, is a superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... In later editions, his connection to Fu Manchu was underplayed after Marvel lost the comic book rights to the latter's character. wikipedia.orgShang-Chi

'Shang-Chi' hits theaters, showing how Marvel flipped the script on Hollywood

CNN 03 September, 2021 - 08:00am

Qatar is working with the Taliban to reopen Kabul’s airport as soon as possible, Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani said on Thursday. READ MORE

New Yorkers were inundated by heavy rain and flash flooding early Thursday as Storm Ida wreaked havoc on the northeast United States, forcing flight cancellations and state of emergency declarations. Police in New York City reported seven deaths, including a 50-year-old man, a 48-year-old woman and a 2-year-old boy who were found unconscious and unresponsive inside a home. READ MORE

Sidharth Shukla Passes Away; Shehnaaz Gill 'Not Fine,' Switches Off Phone

Mahhi Vij: Sidharth Shukla was Very Emotional and Fun Loving Person

Punjab Congress in-charge Harish Rawat on Thursday revealed that the Grand Old Party has been struggling from within and pointed at a few misses in the state which is gearing up for elections in 2022. “Not all is well in Congress. I don’t want to hid from you. Those angry ministers who did not come to meet me, I thank them," he said. READ MORE

Don’t get amused if officials of a local village panchayat here are seen politely persuading visitors to call them by their name or designation instead of usual salutations like ‘sir’ or ‘madam’. Scripting history, the Mathur village panchayat in this north Kerala district has banned the colonial honorifics like ‘sir’ and ‘madam’ in its office premises with an aim to bridge the barrier between common people, people’s representatives and civic body officials. READ MORE

With the untimely demise of popular TV actor and Bigg Boss 13 winner Sidharth Shukla today, grief-stricken social media users are looking to the past for solace. An old episode of Hindi series Balika Vadhu, which arguably brought Shukla to the limelight, is going viral now. READ MORE

Amid the shocking news of Sidharth Shukla‘s death, the actor’s last Instagram post has been reflooded with comments and condolences with fans lamenting the uncertainty of life. In the post, the actor is seen holding a placard and thanking frontline workers for their selfless help for the patients. READ MORE

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

Simu Liu Reveals The One MCU Hero He Wouldn't Want Shang-Chi To Fight | MTV Movies

MTV UK 03 September, 2021 - 08:00am

Qatar is working with the Taliban to reopen Kabul’s airport as soon as possible, Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani said on Thursday. READ MORE

New Yorkers were inundated by heavy rain and flash flooding early Thursday as Storm Ida wreaked havoc on the northeast United States, forcing flight cancellations and state of emergency declarations. Police in New York City reported seven deaths, including a 50-year-old man, a 48-year-old woman and a 2-year-old boy who were found unconscious and unresponsive inside a home. READ MORE

Sidharth Shukla Passes Away; Shehnaaz Gill 'Not Fine,' Switches Off Phone

Mahhi Vij: Sidharth Shukla was Very Emotional and Fun Loving Person

Punjab Congress in-charge Harish Rawat on Thursday revealed that the Grand Old Party has been struggling from within and pointed at a few misses in the state which is gearing up for elections in 2022. “Not all is well in Congress. I don’t want to hid from you. Those angry ministers who did not come to meet me, I thank them," he said. READ MORE

Don’t get amused if officials of a local village panchayat here are seen politely persuading visitors to call them by their name or designation instead of usual salutations like ‘sir’ or ‘madam’. Scripting history, the Mathur village panchayat in this north Kerala district has banned the colonial honorifics like ‘sir’ and ‘madam’ in its office premises with an aim to bridge the barrier between common people, people’s representatives and civic body officials. READ MORE

With the untimely demise of popular TV actor and Bigg Boss 13 winner Sidharth Shukla today, grief-stricken social media users are looking to the past for solace. An old episode of Hindi series Balika Vadhu, which arguably brought Shukla to the limelight, is going viral now. READ MORE

Amid the shocking news of Sidharth Shukla‘s death, the actor’s last Instagram post has been reflooded with comments and condolences with fans lamenting the uncertainty of life. In the post, the actor is seen holding a placard and thanking frontline workers for their selfless help for the patients. READ MORE

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

[Review] “What We Do in the Shadows” Season 3 is the Show’s Biggest, Strongest Season Yet

Screen Rant 03 September, 2021 - 08:00am

[Review] Netflix’s Bloody Action-Thriller ‘Kate’ Offers Stylistic But Familiar Fun

Alfre Woodard Heads to ‘Salem’s Lot’ for New Movie Adaptation of Stephen King Novel

Folk Horror Documentary ‘Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched’ Coming to VOD in October [Trailer]

‘Dune’ Image Gallery Opens Up With Nearly 50 Shots from the Film Ahead of Next Month’s Release

Nia DaCosta’s ‘Candyman’ Reimagines the Mythology With a Sequel-Reboot Hybrid [Revenge of the Remakes]

[Review] “What We Do in the Shadows” Season 3 is the Show’s Biggest, Strongest Season Yet

“The Walking Dead: World Beyond” Final Season Trailer Brings Pollyanna McIntosh into the Spinoff Series [Video]

“Cabinet of Curiosities”: Guillermo del Toro’s Netflix Horror Series Will Feature Episodes by Panos Cosmatos, Jennifer Kent and More!

“Midnight Mass”: Poster Art for Mike Flanagan’s Netflix Horror Series Promises Full Trailer Next Week

Trailer for ‘Train to Busan’ Director’s Netflix Series “Hellbound”! [Video]

[Review] Netflix’s Bloody Action-Thriller ‘Kate’ Offers Stylistic But Familiar Fun

[Review] “What We Do in the Shadows” Season 3 is the Show’s Biggest, Strongest Season Yet

[Review] Glenn Danzig’s ‘Death Rider in the House of Vampires’ Has All the Charm…and Flaws of ‘Verotika’

[Review] “American Horror Story: Double Feature” Makes a Big Splash With the Start to “Red Tide”

[Review] Nia DaCosta’s ‘Candyman’ Is a Bold Reclamation of Legacy and Legend

‘Death Weekend’: Canadian Exploitation and Rural Revenge [Horrors Elsewhere]

Trading Card Treats: Six Notable Horror Trading Card Sets

Nia DaCosta’s ‘Candyman’ Reimagines the Mythology With a Sequel-Reboot Hybrid [Revenge of the Remakes]

Looking Back at the Horror Movies and Their Monsters That Inspired “Castlevania”

Clive Barker’s ‘The Forbidden’ – The Humble Beginnings of the ‘Candyman’ Franchise

‘The Chamber of Terror’ Teaser Gives Us a Taste of Its Practical Gore Effects [Video]

Folk Horror Documentary ‘Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched’ Coming to VOD in October [Trailer]

‘Cleanin’ Up the Town’: Extended Version of Definitive ‘Ghostbusters’ Documentary Blasts Into Theaters and VOD This October [Trailer]

Trailer for ‘Train to Busan’ Director’s Netflix Series “Hellbound”! [Video]

‘Moonfall’: ‘Independence Day’ Director Roland Emmerich is Back With Another Sci-fi Disaster Movie [Trailer]

[Trailer] ‘Hellsweeper VR’ Gives You Godlike Powers To Crush Your Foes With Acrobatic Chaos

More Characters And Game Mechanics Unveiled For ‘Shin Megami Tensei V’

Looking Back at the Horror Movies and Their Monsters That Inspired “Castlevania”

[Watch] Firaxis Unveils Gameplay Trailer For ‘Marvel’s Midnight Suns’

[Video] Fan Releases Footage of VR Mod For ‘Resident Evil 2’, ‘Resident Evil 3’

What We Do in the Shadows exists in a gloriously heightened version of reality that manages to reflect both incredibly dull and unbelievable extremes. The series’ third season has enough dangers in its orbit that it doesn’t need to introduce a real-life pandemic. However, What We Do in the Shadowsnew season operates as both the perfect healing salve for these dark times as well as a story that presciently reflects the idea of “supernatural versus nature” as it digs into the past and considers the future for its vampiric characters. 

What We Do in the Shadows works when its characters are stuck in their home and squabbling over minutiae or when they’re using their supernatural powers to overcome some benign obstacle. Season three ties up these characters with more mundane vampire bureaucracy, which always manifests in an entertaining manner. Living or dead, everyone hates legislature and red tape. One of the series’ greatest strengths remains its ability to brilliantly juxtapose supernatural chaos with monotony to create a deliriously weird synthesis of comedy. These new tasks also mean that there’s a lot more Kristen Schaal present as the vampires’ council liaison. Schaal fits in perfectly and immediately feels like she’s been a permanent fixture of this universe.

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS — “The Prisoner” — Season 3, Episode 1 (Airs September 2) Pictured: Kristen Schaal as The Guide. CR: Russ Martin/FX

What We Do in the Shadows always works well when it has its entire cast together so that their chaotic personalities can ricochet around, but this season also makes sure that there are plenty of character-centric stories that are just as satisfying and aren’t lacking in energy. One of the most important dynamics in the series is the ebb and flow of Guillermo’s bond with his vampire family, which truly blossoms this year. The series reframes this relationship in crucial ways and it’s compelling how there’s an element of fear that now exists between them even though Guillermo is basically a teddy bear. Their arrangement pushes them further apart before it allows them to actually grow closer. Harvey Guillén often proves why he’s the series’ secret weapon as Guillermo grows more competent and intimidating, even if his character doesn’t realize it. It’s fascinating to watch Guillermo develop and it’s fantastic whenever the series demonstrates how much of a natural he is at his bloody birthright. 

What We Do in the Shadows has rampant silliness in play, but there’s also such a sweet core of acceptance, family–and yes, also codependence–that’s a constant source of warmth and positivity beneath these characters’ un-beating hearts. These vampires understand that there’s a code that governs family and friends just as much as there’s one that applies to warriors. All of the personal struggles that the characters work through shine a light on the very real emptiness and malaise that fills them as they try to fill their eternal lives with meaning. It’s a surprising dose of development that proves that endless bloodsucking and sex can reach its end and that there might be more to life. What We Do in the Shadowsvampires strive to grow and break their century-long cycles and it’s rewarding to experience some new sides to these characters. 

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS — “The Prisoner” — Season 3, Episode 1 (Airs September 2) Pictured: Harvey Guillén as Guillermo. CR: Russ Martin/FX

What We Do in the Shadows has reached the point where many genre programs begin to struggle with diminishing returns and spinning their wheels, which makes it deeply gratifying that this absurdist vampire comedy still feels fresh and is able to tackle new undead content without exhuming old graves. What We Do in the Shadows is exceptional in every regard, whether it’s its dialogue, performances, or the hilarious visual gags that take advantage of this exaggerated universe. It accomplishes the rare feat of feeling both natural and ridiculous and it’s eternally witty even when it’s not delving into horror content. Season three of What We Do in the Shadows proves that there’s still a lot of life in its undead corpses and that audiences should prepare to get cozy in a crypt instead of sharpening their stakes.  

Daniel Kurland is a freelance writer, comedian, and critic, whose work can be read on Splitsider, Bloody Disgusting, Den of Geek, ScreenRant, and across the Internet. Daniel knows that "Psycho II" is better than the original and that the last season of "The X-Files" doesn't deserve the bile that it conjures. If you want a drink thrown in your face, talk to him about "Silent Night, Deadly Night Part II," but he'll always happily talk about the "Puppet Master" franchise. The owls are not what they seem.

Over 20 New Horror Movies and Shows Releasing in September 2021!

“What We Do in the Shadows”: The Vamps Wear Their Sunglasses at Night for Neon Character Posters

The Vamps Get Fit In First “What We Do in the Shadows” Season 3 Images

Mary Elizabeth Winstead stars as the eponymous Kate, an expert hitman living in Japan currently working her way through a list of yakuza targets. Her only semblance of friendship and family comes in her handler (Woody Harrelson), and she wonders if obtaining normality beyond her niche career would be possible. Then Kate uncharacteristically blows her latest target, resulting in a series of events that leave her poisoned and with only 24-hours to live. Hell hath no fury like a hitwoman scored; Kate demands vengeance, and she’s going to carve her way to the top to get it.

Copyright © 2021 Bloody Disgusting, LLC

Review: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

Superherohype.com 03 September, 2021 - 08:00am

Diehard comics loyalists upset with Ben Kingsley’s reveal as a fake Mandarin in Iron Man 3 may not necessarily come out of Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings happier with the “real” one. Named Wenwu, and played by international heartthrob Tony Leung, this variation presents as more of a lovelorn widower than supervillain. Even though he’s supposedly a master crimeboss, Wenwu’s grief leads him towards a really stupid master plan.

Yes, Wenwu wields the ten rings, and has been around long enough to do some ancient warlord stuff. But whether it’s simply that Leung didn’t want to play it too evil, or director Destin Daniel Cretton wanted to avoid Orientalist warlord stereotypes, Wenwu comes across as a sentimentalist rather than a true antagonist. Ironically, Mandarin impostor Trevor Slattery gets more justice herein, perhaps because Kingsley has less modesty.

Still, fealty to the comics should be a minor gripe in the case of Shang-Chi. The character on the page was infamously the son of Fu Manchu, whom Marvel Studios wisely decided both morally and legally not to touch. And while Shang-Chi’s title in comics is “the Master of Kung Fu,” his movie is more in the wuxia cinematic genre than it is a kung fu flick.

Technically, in literature and martial arts, the terms can be used partly interchangeably, so let’s just say it’s more wire-fu fantasy than Bruce Lee. As such, the fact that any individual plot point may seem absurd doesn’t matter. At least as long as the journey features plenty of cool martial arts fights.

And this it does. Martial arts plus Marvel magic proves a winning formula. The film doesn’t wait around by giving up too much backstory until at least halfway through. By that time, the viewer’s invested. While a glut of near-daily featurettes may make some readers think they’ve seen most of the movie already, rest assured that most of the footage released is just first-act stuff. Shang-Chi ultimately plays more like Raya and the Last Dragon than Black Widow, with all that entails. Cretton draws heavy visual inspiration from Hero director Zhang Yimou. Though the bus fight you’ve seen countless bits of in clips echoes Jackie Chan.

For the most part, the battles and stunts are impeccable. Only towards the end, when darkness and spraying water seem like a cover for less-polished CG, do the fights (deliberately) become harder to follow. With theaters reopening, Shang-Chi does feature the option of watching in 3D, and the conversion gets thoughtfully applied. Also perhaps worth pointing out: stay for both the mid-credits and post-credits scenes.

But Shang-Chi, even more so than some other Marvel movies, plays nearly as much like a comedy as it does a wuxia. Leads Simu Liu and Awkwafina have extensive comedic experience, and the filmmakers do not waste it. Awkwafina’s Katy in particular is exactly what her fans expect. Yes, that includes getting two vagina jokes into a Disney/Marvel four-quadrant feature.

Liu can’t go as broad while also playing a tormented action hero, but his timing with words is as precise as his bo staff. Anyone who has paid attention to the movie merchandise may have seen a strange sidekick creature named Morris. Let’s just say it behaves as comically strange as it looks.

In animation, some of the story points here might feel cliched, as they did in Batman: Soul of the Dragon. But at least in a Hollywood movie, those bits feel significantly fresher in live-action. It isn’t quite Wakanda, but Marvel opens a new realm here, rife with possibilities for sequels. Odds of Iron Man facing the “true” Mandarin remain as low as before, but much about the Ten Rings organization remains for exploration. Including the eponymous jewelry’s thus-far super vague origins.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings does develop connections to the larger Marvel universe. But the best compliment to the movie is the fact that it doesn’t need them. The Shang-Chi universe could be as self-contained as Venom (so far) and still feel compelling. Perhaps that’s because great martial arts movies feel less common these days, at least stateside.

But from an opening fight that explicitly connects movie martial arts duels with ballet as a form of courtship, to a finale involving…well, things that would be spoilers, Cretton, previously known for smaller dramas, displays the confidence that he knows this stuff. Then he proceeds to deliver.

WandaVision remains the MCU’s best offering of 2021. But Shang-Chi stands firmly in the upper tier.

Grade: 4/5

Shang-Chi: Why Marvel's first Asian superhero is empowering change

BBC News 02 September, 2021 - 07:08pm

An Asian-American superhero exploring his cultural identity and confronting family ties in a fight to save the world? Probably not.

But that's exactly what Shang-Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings offers.

Directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, the 25th movie in the Marvel cinematic universe (MCU) breaks new ground by introducing Simu Liu as its first Asian superhero on the big screen.

Liu says it is "an incredible honour" to represent the community.

His title role sees him play a martial arts master turned assassin who, following the death of his mother, grew up doing the bidding of his grief-stricken warlord father Wenwu - owner of the all-powerful Ten Rings.

Now estranged from his family, we first meet Shang-Chi attempting to reinvent himself in America by living as a valet driver named Shaun.

But this new life of parking cars (amid weeknight karaoke sessions with his co-worker and best friend Katy) is thrown into chaos when an ambush by his father's shadowy Ten Rings army reveals a plan that forces him to confront his past.

Discussing the role earlier this month Liu told reporters: "It's so rare that... people that look like me are thrust into those positions and I think it's tremendously empowering".

Cretton, born in Maui, Hawaii, similarly added: "I never had a superhero who I could identify with when I was a kid, and to be able to have an option for a new generation of kids who look like me or who have a similar background as me, that's very special."

The film's commitment to representation ensures a predominantly Asian cast alongside Liu that scales a spectrum of established and fresh faces.

Legendary Hong Kong actor Tony Leung offers heft as Shang-Chi's father intoxicated by the power of the Ten Rings, while Fala Chen plays his late mother Ying Li and Michelle Yeoh his aunt, both from the mystical land of Ta-Lo.

New names include Meng'er Zhang in her debut film role as Shang's embittered younger sister Xialing, with Ocean's 8 and Crazy Rich Asians star Awkwafina portraying Shaun/Shang-Chi's kooky friend and sidekick Katy.

The diverse casting call reflects moves in Hollywood to capitalise on, and react to, film's growing culture shift to the East.

Crazy Rich Asians, based on a novel by Kevin Kwan, was the first US blockbuster with an all-Asian cast. It made just under £200m worldwide.

Fast behind it came the historic win for South Korean film Parasite, which was named best picture at the Oscars in 2020. This year, Korean-American film Minari, which follows a Korean family's attempts to forge their own American dream, capped multiple nominations at the Academy Awards with a best supporting actress victory for Yuh-Jung Youn - the first Korean actress to do so.

Discussing the changing face of Asian-American cinema in a roundtable interview with The New York Times, Minari's director Lee Isaac Chung said: "Initially what we saw of Asian-American films tended to be more exotic portrayals of Asians when you see them in Hollywood.

"Then I felt like there was a movement of just more pure identity cinema, a struggle to get our faces on the screen, to also explain ourselves in a way to a wide audience.

"What's happening now is that shift where we're just telling our stories as people and it doesn't have to be in relation to white America or a majority culture. We're just people. We didn't want Minari to be a 'by us, for us' sort of film. Because I felt like that was also something that we need to get beyond as well."

Shang-Chi is Marvel's attempt to mirror this three-dimensional cultural storytelling in its blockbuster superhero stable - dragging the little-known "master of kung-fu", as described in the original 1970s comics, into the present day.

While the Ten Rings terrorist group has been an underlying element of the MCU since 2008, when it surfaced to kidnap Tony Stark in the first Iron Man film, this is the first time the backstory has been properly explored.

Producers Jonathan Schwartz and Kevin Feige (also president of Marvel Studios) say they consciously put power in the hands of those with lived experience to create the most authentic origin tale.

Cretton's personal vision of a superhero reconciling personal and family ties won them over.

Liu personally recognises the duality of his character he created: "I'm somebody who feels caught between two worlds a lot of the time," he told a gala earlier this month.

So just how is this reflected on screen?

The multilingual cast made language a powerful tool. "Speaking was always rooted in just the logic of the characters" says Cretton, who allowed the cast to converse in "whatever made sense for the scene", be it English or Chinese.

Liu points to one specific improvised scene where Awkwafina's character, Katy, discloses only being able to speak simplified "ABC" (American Born Chinese). "This is the first time that you really see in a [Hollywood] movie someone calling out a lived experience," says Liu.

Katy's playful on-screen chemistry with Shaun-turned-Shang-Chi is one of the film's highlights. The pair play off their cultural identities with humour and sensitivity. When she asks Shaun his Chinese name, he mocks her pronunciation of Shang-Chi. Their time working as valet drivers also sees Katy describe herself as "the Asian Geoff Gordon".

Beyond quips, Cretton suggests Shang-Chi's relatability as "a superhero that doesn't get splashed with chemicals to get his superpower" makes it easier for audiences to connect with the film's themes of identity.

"This is a journey of self-discovery, of growing up, of learning how to finally deal with pain that he's been running away from his entire life. And that when he is finally able to look inside into his past and embrace good, bad, the joy, the pain, and accept it all as a part of himself," he says.

If Shang-Chi attempts to refresh the Marvel character mould, so does Liu as its lead star.

The 32-year-old, who grew up in Canada and was previously best known for playing Jung in Kim's Convenience, admits he felt a "huge sense of imposter syndrome" stepping into the Marvel universe.

A former Deloitte worker, he switched to acting after being laid off. Not-so-glamourous past credits include an appearance as an extra on Guillermo del Toro's Pacific Rim and work as a stock photo model (much to the internet's amusement).

Liu has, unsurprisingly, described this latest role as a "dream" but also frequently emphasised the sense of responsibility he feels in helping to diversify Marvel's superheroes.

This has included forcefully batting away any sense of novelty value - including from his bosses at Disney, who own Marvel.

The entertainment giant has released two other films with predominantly Asian casts - the live-action Mulan and the animated feature Raya and the Last Dragon - on their streaming service during the pandemic.

All of Disney's recent releases - like Jungle Cruise, Black Widow and Cruella - have been simultaneously released in theatres and on Disney Plus Premier Access, where subscribers pay an additional fee to watch a brand new release.

Shang-Chi, by contrast, is being given a traditional exclusive cinema release, despite audiences currently failing to return to pre-Covid levels in the UK.

Last month, Disney's CEO Bob Chapek said: "We think [Shang-Chi] is actually going to be an interesting experiment for us because it's got only a 45-day [theatrical] window... So the prospect of being able to take a Marvel title to the service after going theatrical for 45 days will be yet another data point to inform our actions going forward on our titles."

Liu seemed to respond to that comment when he posted on social media to forcefully state that Shang-Chi is "not an experiment."

"We are the underdog; the underestimated. We are the ceiling-breakers. We are the celebration of culture and joy that will persevere after an embattled year," Liu wrote. "We are the surprise. I'm fired... up to make history."

A superhero rallying cry to celebrate Asian culture - both on screen and beyond. Shang-Chi's fight is more than fantasy.

Videos circulating online show panicked shoppers running out of a supermarket in Auckland.

15 sayings from around the world

What to watch this Labor Day weekend: Marvel's new 'Shang-Chi,' Camila Cabello as 'Cinderella'

USA TODAY 02 September, 2021 - 07:00am

New films streaming and in theaters this weekend: Simu Liu is Marvel's newest superhero in 'Shang-Chi,' pop star Camila Cabello takes on 'Cinderella.'

A link has been sent to your friend's email address.

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Simu Liu chats with USA TODAY's Brian Truitt about "Shang-Chi and the Legend of the 10 Rings," the first Marvel film with an Asian lead. USA TODAY

It's Labor Day weekend and you know what that means: an extra day off to watch a new movie. There are plenty of places to see them with theaters up and running and new films still streaming at home to entertain you and your family heading into the fall season.

This weekend, Simu Liu is Marvel's newest superhero in a martial-arts fantasy extravaganza; pop star Camila Cabello headlines an all-star musical redo of a familiar fairy tale; Michael Keaton has an unthinkable job in a 9/11 drama; and former Nickelodeon kid Victoria Justice is trying to right wrongs from the afterlife in a Netflix comedy.

Here's a guide to new movies that'll satisfy every cinematic taste:

Like Marvel dudes Robert Downey Jr. and Chris Evans before him, Liu has such innate likability that you'll go on any adventure with him – even one that involves crazy dragons, magical martial arts and international terrorist dads. Liu's Shang-Chi and his best friend, Katy (Awkwafina), go from parking cars in San Francisco to keeping Shang-Chi's troubled father (Tony Leung) from invading a mystical village in a solid superhero effort that starts off great yet loses some of its mojo digging into an epic mythology.

Where to watch: In theaters

Bizarre, haphazard but not without its odd charms, the jukebox musical casts Cabello as Ella, an fashionista orphan who just wants to sell dresses but gets caught up in drama involving balls, glass slippers, a fairy godmother (a scene-stealing Billy Porter) and a wife-seeking prince (Nicholas Galitzine). The tweaks to the usual Cinderella script are hit-and-miss, and the mix of cover songs and a couple of originals is often baffling – though Idina Menzel (as Ella's not-that-wicked stepmother) singing Madonna is everything.

Where to watch:Amazon Prime

"What is a life worth?" That's the emotionally taxing question at the heart of director Sara Colangelo's drama starring Keaton as Ken Feinberg, the attorney heading up a compensation fund for victims of the Sept. 11 attacks. The film treats the real-life events with proper reverence, though gets lost telling all the stories, from Feinberg's team to those affected by the loss of life. Still, the acting's top notch, from Keaton to Laura Benanti (as the wife of a first responder) to Stanley Tucci (as Feinberg's biggest critic).

Where to watch:Netflix

The onetime "Victorious" star plays a very sociable, party-hearty woman whose 25th birthday week begins auspiciously when she takes a header into the side of a toilet and ends up in a purgatory-esque waiting room. A guardian angel (Robyn Scott) tells her that, to go to heaven, she needs to make things right on Earth with her estranged mom (Gloria Garcia), yoga dad (Adam Garcia) and workaholic best friend (Midori Francis), and very Lifetime-y schmaltziness ensues along with some ghostly shenanigans.

Where to watch:Netflix

With a nasty storm coming, a family takes refuge in their bathroom to ride out the bad weather, but things take a horrifyingly poor turn from there in Sean King O'Grady's creep show. A fallen tree traps them in there for days with no food, the teen daughter (Sierra McCormick) blames herself, resentment between mom (Vinessa Shaw) and dad (Pat Healy) boils over while all manner of terror presents itself, though the film doesn't answer enough of its mysteries to be actually satisfying.

Where to watch: In theaters and on Apple TV, Google Play

"Shang-Chi" might just whet your appetite for more Asian-influenced action, so here's where to turn next: Japanese actress/singer Masumi wields a mean sword as a young woman who, when she turns 21, learns she's the long-lost heiress to one-half of the Yakuza crime syndicate. She fills in quite a bit of her sketchy past and teams with a scarred, amnesiac stranger (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) when a whole bunch of goons comes after her in the Brazilian-set thriller. 

Where to watch: In theaters and on Apple TV, Vudu, Google Play

One of the best character actors out there, Whigham adds to his list of tough-guy roles and takes the lead in this fairly straightforward crime drama as a hard-luck but caring social worker looking out for a little girl and her mom (Olivia Munn) when the criminal dad (Zach Avery) leaves prison. The '70s cop-movie aesthetic belies its modern-day setting, but it's nice to see old-school thespians Bruce Dern and Keith David along for the ride.

Where to watch: In theaters and on Apple TV, Google Play

This is the 6,297th movie (approximately) to rejigger "Cyrano de Bergerac," but at least now the TikTok generation has their own version. Wanting some extra money for plastic surgery, class nerd Cy (Jared Gilman) signs on to help very bro-y popular kid Chris (David Gridley) – known for his karate web videos – class up his social-media presence to win over the artsy new girl in school, Roxy (Aurora Perrineau). It all skews very predictable, though with teen body-image issues and "Napoleon Dynamite" quirkiness at play 

Where to watch:Apple TV

Michael Greyeyes has a chilling turn in the solemn thriller playing a Native American businessman who covered up a classmate's murder when he was an abused boy living on a Wisconsin reservation. Now living in the Bay Area with a new name, he goes to extremes to keep that past hidden from his pregnant wife (Kate Bosworth) and colleague (Jesse Eisenberg) when the cousin (Chaske Spencer) who helped him with that dark childhood misdeed shows up unexpectedly.

Where to watch: In theaters and on Apple TV

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

© 2021 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

We use cookies to personalize content and ads, provide social media features, improve our site and analyze our traffic. We may share information about your use of our site with our advertising, social and analytics providers. By clicking “Accept All Cookies” you agree to the use of these cookies as further described in our Privacy Policy

Entertainment Stories