Shroud laughs off claims Twitch “will die” as star streamers flock to YouTube

Technology

Dexerto 03 September, 2021 - 01:45am 17 views

Did Timthetatman leave twitch?

TimTheTatman And DrLupo Leave Twitch For YouTube. KotakuTwitch’s Biggest Stars Keep Jumping To YouTube

Facebook Gaming has expanded licensed music rights to streamers

NME 03 September, 2021 - 04:48am

In a huge coup against streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube, Facebook Gaming now lets creators listen to licensed music in the background.

Facebook Gaming’s Luis Renato Olivalves announced the rollout yesterday (September 2), which will let Level Up Creators play background music during their gaming streams on the platform, which includes clips made from a livestream or VOD versions without fear of being struck down by copyright claims.

“Gaming creators should be able to focus on streaming and connection with their communities — without worrying about music rights,” wrote Olivalves. “That’s why we’ve been working closely with the music industry on a solution.”

Facebook Gaming had already made it possible for Partner Creators to stream licensed music last year. A partner status however requires a high threshold, with streamers needing at least 3,000 engaged followers and  earning US$2,000 (£1,445) per month.

More creators can now play background music during livestreams on #FacebookGaming! More details here: https://t.co/y7SjnbfjDa

But that's not all! To celebrate we've launched the #PLAYLOUD series – featuring our top creators teamed up with celebrity DJs… pic.twitter.com/eXTSZ4erpI

— Facebook Gaming (@FacebookGaming) September 2, 2021

Olivalves clarified in his post that the past year has been a “test” for Partner Creators “to ensure they’re able to use a vast array of popular music in their streams without risk of takedowns”, which the company has used to learn and improve on before expanding its access to Level Up Creators, the equivalent of Twitch Affiliates.

Facebook Gaming has secured deals with hundreds of music labels and publishers, including Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Kobalt Music Group, BMG, Merlin, and many more, so streamers will be able to play the music they want, when they want, and regardless of the streaming software they use.

There will still be a few restricted tracks that aren’t licensed for the platform, but Facebook Gaming assured that this is rare. “If you run into a restricted track, we’ll surface an in-product notification that identifies the artist and title. That way you can adjust your playlist to avoid future interruptions.”

To celebrate the move, Facebook Gaming is also hosting a series of celebrity DJ streams paired with select streamers called #PlayLoud, headlined by Diplo and DJ Khaled. More details on the events can be found here.

Elsewhere, this week saw Twitch streamers striking to protest the platform’s inaction over abuse under the hashtag #ADayOffTwitch. The protest took place on September 1 and reportedly saw a significant drop in concurrent Twitch views of around 1million.

The world's defining voice in music and pop culture since 1952.

Dr Disrespect says YouTube vs Twitch choice is easy, and it's "nowhere close"

For The Win 03 September, 2021 - 01:22am

Since YouTube has started dipping their toes into the live-streaming world, they have been compared to Twitch quite often. With the recent signings of TimTheTatman and DrLupo, two of Twitch’s largest streamers, the Google-owned platform has been under more eyes than normal.

While the leader of the TatmanArmy has explained he enjoys the platform so far, Dr Disrespect has a different opinion.

“From a functional standpoint, wrong. I think YouTube’s nowhere close” the Doc stated before motioning to turn off his music. He then continued: “Number one, there’s no discoverability. Your algorithms… I mean, do I need to hire a scientist or something?”

“When I shut down the stream, it seems everything just goes into a black hole,” he said, implying his thoughts are due to a lack of channel raids and Twitch hosts.

While YouTube has the ability to “Live Redirect” your community to a video premiere, it’s limited to your channel only.

Maybe with the signing of two of Twitch’s biggest stars, we’ll start to see the platform address some of the concerns the Doc has raised.

DrLupo reveals how YouTube eventually lured him away from Twitch streaming

Dexerto 02 September, 2021 - 11:27pm

DrLupo turned the internet upside down after announcing a shock move to YouTube. Timothy ‘TimTheTatman’ Betar followed suit shortly after and explained why their new home was far better than Twitch.

In an exclusive interview with The Washington Post, DrLupo revealed the main reason why he decided to switch, explaining it was simple as them making him an offer he “couldn’t refuse” because it “secured the bag” for his family.

“The financial situation that YouTube presented me, without a doubt is like, you know, I’m secure for life. Everybody’s trying to get to that point. Why would I say no to that?” he said.

“Everybody’s just trying to secure the bag, right? There’s no shame in that. That’s literally why everybody gets up and goes to work, right?”

It’s not all about the money, though. The deal also means he can afford to spend less time streaming and more time focusing on himself and his family, which he described as “crazy important.”

DrLupo admitted that the switch means he’s gone from a “pretty big fish in a lake” to a “little fish in the ocean.” However, he is adamant that the pros will outweigh the cons and believes it will present new opportunities.

“There’s so much room to grow and there are so many opportunities to do incredible things with all sorts of content creators on YouTube,” he said.” I think people underestimate the size of the platform and how much you can do with it.”

DrLupo reveals how YouTube eventually lured him away from Twitch streaming

Dot Esports 02 September, 2021 - 11:27pm

DrLupo turned the internet upside down after announcing a shock move to YouTube. Timothy ‘TimTheTatman’ Betar followed suit shortly after and explained why their new home was far better than Twitch.

In an exclusive interview with The Washington Post, DrLupo revealed the main reason why he decided to switch, explaining it was simple as them making him an offer he “couldn’t refuse” because it “secured the bag” for his family.

“The financial situation that YouTube presented me, without a doubt is like, you know, I’m secure for life. Everybody’s trying to get to that point. Why would I say no to that?” he said.

“Everybody’s just trying to secure the bag, right? There’s no shame in that. That’s literally why everybody gets up and goes to work, right?”

It’s not all about the money, though. The deal also means he can afford to spend less time streaming and more time focusing on himself and his family, which he described as “crazy important.”

DrLupo admitted that the switch means he’s gone from a “pretty big fish in a lake” to a “little fish in the ocean.” However, he is adamant that the pros will outweigh the cons and believes it will present new opportunities.

“There’s so much room to grow and there are so many opportunities to do incredible things with all sorts of content creators on YouTube,” he said.” I think people underestimate the size of the platform and how much you can do with it.”

DrLupo reveals how YouTube eventually lured him away from Twitch streaming

NME.com 02 September, 2021 - 11:27pm

DrLupo turned the internet upside down after announcing a shock move to YouTube. Timothy ‘TimTheTatman’ Betar followed suit shortly after and explained why their new home was far better than Twitch.

In an exclusive interview with The Washington Post, DrLupo revealed the main reason why he decided to switch, explaining it was simple as them making him an offer he “couldn’t refuse” because it “secured the bag” for his family.

“The financial situation that YouTube presented me, without a doubt is like, you know, I’m secure for life. Everybody’s trying to get to that point. Why would I say no to that?” he said.

“Everybody’s just trying to secure the bag, right? There’s no shame in that. That’s literally why everybody gets up and goes to work, right?”

It’s not all about the money, though. The deal also means he can afford to spend less time streaming and more time focusing on himself and his family, which he described as “crazy important.”

DrLupo admitted that the switch means he’s gone from a “pretty big fish in a lake” to a “little fish in the ocean.” However, he is adamant that the pros will outweigh the cons and believes it will present new opportunities.

“There’s so much room to grow and there are so many opportunities to do incredible things with all sorts of content creators on YouTube,” he said.” I think people underestimate the size of the platform and how much you can do with it.”

TimtheTatman Teamkills Dr Disrespect in First Warzone Stream on YouTube

GameRant 02 September, 2021 - 11:25pm

Earlier in the year, TimTheTatman indicated that he was not allowed to play with Dr. Disrespect even off-stream, let alone live on Twitch. This was a surprising revelation to fans, as it would appear that the partnership rules at Twitch are even more strict than one would have assumed--and that perhaps the breakup between Doc and Twitch was even messier than imagined. However, now that Tim is on the same platform as "Two-Time" (as Doc calls himself) the duo can once again enjoy gaming together. They did so recently in Warzone, and it resulted in Tim running over Dr. Disrespect.

Doc, Tim, CouRageJD, and DrLupo all teamed up in a big Call of Duty: Warzone match recently, as DrLupo also just signed with YouTube. The session was a perfect celebration of streamers coming together for the first time in a long time, but it was upended at one point by a likely suspect: Tim. While driving vehicles through the airport, Tim rammed his vehicle into the side of Dr. Disrespect and CouRageJD's. The result was that both streamers were killed. Tim laughed uproariously, CouRageJD sounded jokingly disgusted, and Two-Time's reaction to Tim the two-timer was just to sit in shocked and comical silence.

This is far from the first time that Tim has been a part of a viral moment while streaming. Over 300,000 viewers watched TimTheTatman win in Fall Guys for the first time, after failing seemingly endlessly before that. Leading up to his victory, he was being berated by the Fall Guys social media handler. In general, Tim tends to find himself in these situations, which is probably why Dr. Disrespect's description of his live stream from the Call of Duty: Warzone shenanigans is "It's one big reunion and Timmy Tenders is still terrible at Warzone."

In the end, the team kill was an accident and the entire thing is in good fun, as it was excellent to see Tim on a new platform. It truly seems like the guys had a blast, regardless of whether they were slaying out or goofing off. For the fans--and likely for the friends themselves--it is great to see Doc and Tim stream together again, along with CouRageJD, DrLupo, and others.

Call of Duty: Warzone is available now on PC, PS4, PS5, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X/S.

Ever since Jonathan first laid his eyes on level 1-1 in Super Mario Bros., he has been hooked on all things video games. A self-proclaimed Nintendo nerd, Jonathan has owned every single Nintendo console (save the Virtual Boy) but also became a big fan of Xbox and PlayStation once the 2000s rolled around. Through news, features, reviews, and previews at Game Rant, Jonathan believes it is just as important to be critical in journalism as it is to be thrilled about the joy that top-notch game design can provide.

TimTheTatman explains why YouTube Gaming is better than Twitch

Dexerto 02 September, 2021 - 02:31pm

Tim made waves online on September 1 when he announced he would be jumping ship to YouTube Gaming to join the likes of his friend Dr Disrespect.

According to Tim, there are a number of things that he prefers YouTube for over Twitch. For example, Tim is a huge supporter of viewers being able to pause his stream and come back with no interruptions, even when clipping.

Plus, while he’s only just now starting streaming on YouTube, he’s been considered a YouTuber by fans even when he was one of Twitch’s biggest names.

“Eight of ten people that come up to me when I get recognized call me a YouTuber!” he revealed. “It was so bizarre to me. Ultimately, at the end of the day, man, there are more eyes on YouTube and more people know about YouTube.”

Ever since Mixer’s shut down, YouTube has emerged as the only real rival to Twitch and with the recent acquisitions of Tim and DrLupo, the roster is growing stronger by the day.

Plus, for smaller streamers, Tim highly recommends YouTube considering the recommendation options the platform has.

“So, it’s like all the eyeballs can be funneled into an algorithm that recommends something,” he added before taking aim at Twitch. “Rather than being somewhere where you have a category and you hope that someone scrolls low enough that they can see you with five to ten viewers, whatever you have.”

Consider the number of streamers on Twitch, getting discovered can be quite a pain and a lot of it just comes down to luck.

According to Tim, a year ago he wanted to see how far he could scroll down on Twitch’s Warzone category and ended up scrolling “forever.”

“At the end of the day, when I’m talking about the benefits of YouTube, that’s one thing I’m talking about,” Tim said in regards to people asking him if he was worried about discoverability.

It will be very fun to see how this new streamer war between Twitch and YouTube develops, especially with Tim taking such a liking to his new home on YouTube Gaming.

How streaming star TimTheTatman prevents burnout with weekends off and family time, and why he has no regrets about seeking balance with move to YouTube

Business Insider 02 September, 2021 - 12:00am

But the biggest names in the business are becoming more vocal about the toll streaming can take on their mental health. And as they strike deals to set themselves up for the next stage in their career, many are seeking opportunities that will help them find more balance. 

That's one of the motivations Tim "TimTheTatman" Betar cited when he explained to Insider why he's decamping from Twitch for an exclusive streaming deal with YouTube.

"You can burn yourself out pretty heavy in an industry like this," said 31-year-old Betar, who lives in Texas with his wife and 2-year-old son. Betar said that streamers on YouTube aren't expected to broadcast the same number of hours as those on Twitch, where some of the most prolific stars log as many as 250 hours each month.

"I still love streaming, and I love gaming, but ultimately I am getting older," Betar said, explaining that his job encompasses not just playing video games but also managing the business opportunities that come from having 7 million followers on Twitch and more than 3.8 million subscribers on YouTube. "When I started, I had no family obligations and I could do a lot of hours. The reality is, now that I've got my wife and my son, it's hard for me to stream as much as I did beforehand."

To find balance, Betar takes the weekends off from streaming and plans a couple weeks of vacation each summer. "Typically I do Monday through Friday and then I do weekends off," he said. "I've been a firm advocate of taking at least two days off of streaming. I think it helps a lot. I even talk about taking breaks just in general. A lot of people, they just grind and they grind and they grind, and burnout is a real big thing in this industry." 

It's become a big enough thing that other top streamers have started to speak more publicly about the pressure they experience. 

Ben "DrLupo" Luo, 34, told The Washington Post on Monday that mental health, as well as carving out more time to spend with his family, was a reason he inked an exclusive streaming deal with YouTube. An August Wired profile of Imane "Pokimane" Anys laid out how hard it's been for the 25-year-old to slow down as she's achieved Twitch fame. "As I saw my career and my job becoming a larger and larger part of my life, I recognized that I had to find some way to balance it," she told the magazine. 

Even the most-followed streamer on Twitch, Tyler "Ninja" Blevins, chose to leave the platform for Microsoft-owned Mixer in an effort to relieve some of the pressure he felt to constantly feed fans with new programming. Though he returned to Twitch last summer, he told The Hollywood Reporter that he's "a lot more comfortable and relaxed knowing I don't have to be live every single day."

Betar said that some people in the gaming community give him flack for taking time away from the stream, but he has no regrets. "Those memories I'm making with family and friends are so valuable, and that reset I get is so valuable. It resets you mentally and physically," he said. "On top of that, makes you want to come back and stream again."

Technology Stories