Steven Martin, Martin Short on the ‘generation gap’ acting with Selena Gomez

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Today.com 12 September, 2021 - 07:51am 12 views

Here’s How Sting Came To Guest Star on Hulu’s ‘Only Murders In The Building’

Just Jared 12 September, 2021 - 02:22pm

Many fans were quite surprised to see Sting pop up on Only Murders in the Building this week on Hulu.

Co-creator John Hoffman is opening up about how the show managed to get the famed musician on the show.

Click inside to read more…

If you haven’t seen the latest episode, Sting stars as a more cranky version of himself, who becomes one of the suspects in Tim’s murder.

Speaking with E! News, John shared that the character had always been written as a recognizable celebrity, but he never expected to book Sting in the part.

“Crazy, right?” he shared. “We all felt, ‘Well good luck to us on that.’ But it was born out of the idea [that] in these kinds of buildings in New York, that can happen. You’ll be seeing someone famous because this is their home when they’re in New York.”

John continued, “When it comes to like, someone with acting experience, someone with like, you know, just a magnetic personality, for me, you don’t really have to go much further to land on Sting.”

The show was lucky enough to have casting director Bernard “Bernie” Telsey on their side, who also worked with Sting on his Broadway show, The Last Ship.

“We got on a Zoom with Sting,” John remembered. “He was in France, pandemic hiding out in a stunning French château.”

He also revealed that Sting “could not have been more thrilled and excited to jump in” and added he was “fantastic” on set.

Sting‘s character is one that Charles (Steve Martin), Oliver Putnam (Martin Short) and Mabel Mora (Selena Gomez) suspect is the killer of fellow Arconia resident, Tim Kono (Julian Cihi).

Oliver first accuses Sting of the crime, and the other two brush it off until it’s revealed that he had lost millions thanks to Tim, who was the Grammy winner’s stockbroker.

Only Murders in the Building is streaming now on Hulu.

Here’s How Sting Came To Guest Star on Hulu’s ‘Only Murders In The Building’

Today.com 12 September, 2021 - 02:22pm

Many fans were quite surprised to see Sting pop up on Only Murders in the Building this week on Hulu.

Co-creator John Hoffman is opening up about how the show managed to get the famed musician on the show.

Click inside to read more…

If you haven’t seen the latest episode, Sting stars as a more cranky version of himself, who becomes one of the suspects in Tim’s murder.

Speaking with E! News, John shared that the character had always been written as a recognizable celebrity, but he never expected to book Sting in the part.

“Crazy, right?” he shared. “We all felt, ‘Well good luck to us on that.’ But it was born out of the idea [that] in these kinds of buildings in New York, that can happen. You’ll be seeing someone famous because this is their home when they’re in New York.”

John continued, “When it comes to like, someone with acting experience, someone with like, you know, just a magnetic personality, for me, you don’t really have to go much further to land on Sting.”

The show was lucky enough to have casting director Bernard “Bernie” Telsey on their side, who also worked with Sting on his Broadway show, The Last Ship.

“We got on a Zoom with Sting,” John remembered. “He was in France, pandemic hiding out in a stunning French château.”

He also revealed that Sting “could not have been more thrilled and excited to jump in” and added he was “fantastic” on set.

Sting‘s character is one that Charles (Steve Martin), Oliver Putnam (Martin Short) and Mabel Mora (Selena Gomez) suspect is the killer of fellow Arconia resident, Tim Kono (Julian Cihi).

Oliver first accuses Sting of the crime, and the other two brush it off until it’s revealed that he had lost millions thanks to Tim, who was the Grammy winner’s stockbroker.

Only Murders in the Building is streaming now on Hulu.

Endorsement: The many reasons to vote no on recalling Gov. Gavin Newsom

Yahoo News 12 September, 2021 - 07:00am

You may have filled it out and mailed it back as millions of Californians have already done or cast a ballot in person at one of the early voting centers. Good for you. You can stop reading now. This editorial is for those who haven’t voted yet, especially those who aren’t sure if they will.

Please do so — and soon. California allows ballots mailed on election day a full week to trickle into election headquarters and still count if they are postmarked no later than Tuesday. But why wait and tempt fate that something will come up and prevent you from mailing back that super important ballot? There’s too much at stake to sit out this election, not just for California’s immediate future but possibly the political direction of the nation.

And — please, please — mark no on the first question that asks if Gov. Gavin Newsom should be kicked out of office. No matter how you feel about Newsom’s performance, voting yes will unleash months of political chaos that will be bad for the state at a time when it needs its leaders focused on responding to and recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Our editorial board urges a NO vote on Question 1, whether to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom. On Question 2, we think former Mayor Kevin Faulconer of San Diego is the only responsible option.

And frankly, Newsom does not deserve to be unceremoniously dumped from office before his term is up. He’s been a strong, decent leader of this complicated, high-maintenance state during a really tough time in history. Remember — Newsom had been governor for only about one year when the world was struck by the most serious public health crisis in a century.

And while it’s easy to criticize him now for not being the perfect pandemic governor, he and his Cabinet performed quite admirably while in the midst of a public health crisis for which there was no modern playbook. He listened to health experts, followed the ever-evolving science and worked very hard to craft policies that would protect the health of Californians and the state’s economy.

Many people are mad about how the pandemic upended their lives, but that’s not Newsom’s fault, and punishing him will not fix anything. In fact, it likely would make things worse for everyone in the state.

A close look at Larry Elder, the top challenger in the California recall election: his life, his beliefs and his sudden political rise.

The Los Angeles Times editorial board interviewed the leading recall candidates and has written in-depth editorials about their stands on various policy topics. Generally speaking, the top candidates — most of whom are Republicans — have positions that are at odds with California values, which we define as those that build a more welcoming, tolerant, prosperous, healthy and equitable state.

Here’s a quick recap of the many reasons that we find the leading recall candidates ill-suited to serve out the remaining months of Newsom’s term as governor.

Most do not support the public health measures that have protected California from suffering as much sickness and death from COVID-19 as the similarly warm and populous states of Texas and Florida — both of which have governors who have blocked common-sense efforts such as mask mandates and vaccine verification.

The leading Republican recall candidates also oppose policies that have made California a global leader on climate change. Newsom has aggressively pushed for a fossil-fuel-free future for the state, and the leading candidates to replace Newsom would almost certainly slow the state’s ambitious efforts. Or worse, they would reverse them by embracing more fracking and oil drilling.

The biggest threat to Gov. Gavin Newsom aren’t the recall candidates. It’s voters who may skip this election altogether.

They also would seek policies to undermine important criminal justice reforms taken in recent years. Recall candidates and supporters have been trotting out versions of the false, fear-based argument about rising crime in California, and how it’s all Newsom’s fault. That is just plain wrong.

When it comes to homelessness, none has anything to offer beyond sweeping but ill-conceived plans that would swoop up homeless people into shelters, no matter whether that’s legal, effective or the most humane response to people struggling with poverty, mental illness or substance abuse. By contrast, Newsom has directed billions toward the acquisition of hotels, motels and apartment buildings to turn into housing for homeless people.

On education the candidates fall back on simplistic notions that school choice, mainly charter schools, will fix everything. It won’t. Furthermore, their ideas for addressing pandemic-affected education simply repeat steps Newsom has already taken to reopen schools and direct more funding for teachers, counselors and extra tutoring.

California is facing an epic water shortage, but most recall candidates don’t offer anything more than shallow and outdated solutions and say that water conservation efforts are unnecessary. They clearly don’t fully grasp the challenges to the state’s hydrology system. They seem to think the solution is simply to build more dams to capture water that doesn’t exist or more desalination plants, as if removing salt from water was as easy as pouring it through a sieve.

This brings us to the second question on the ballot, which asks voters to choose Newsom’s replacement should the recall pass. Even if you vote no on the recall, you can vote for a replacement — and you should, just in case.

But who? Since the law bars Newsom from running as a replacement to himself, we think the only candidate who comes close to being qualified to run a state the size and complexity of California is Kevin Faulconer.

The recall election is only the most recent effort by those with an ideological or political stake in opposing criminal California’s achievements in reforming the criminal justice system to attack those reforms. But voters know what they’re doing.

Faulconer is moderate Republican, and as the former mayor of San Diego, the state’s second largest city, he has experience running a large government. While he’s the best of a bad lot, he’s still not as innovative and forward-thinking as Newsom.

So go vote — and say no when you do.

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The Los Angeles Times’ editorial board determines the editorial positions of the organization. The editorial board opines on the important issues of the day – exhorting, explaining, deploring, mourning, applauding or championing, as the case may be. The board, which operates separately from the newsroom, proceeds on the presumption that serious, non-partisan, intellectually honest engagement with the world is a requirement of good citizenship. You can read more about the board’s mission and its members at the About The Times Editorial Board page.

'Only Murders in the Building': Steve Martin Is a Lot Like Charles

Showbiz Cheat Sheet 11 September, 2021 - 01:02am

Binge-worthy entertainment news and celebrity interviews

Steve Martin is a multi-talented star who has appeared in everything from television and movie productions to stage and theater shows. Still, his role in Only Murders in the Building is unlike anything he’s ever done before. The Hulu show tells the story of three strangers who all share an interest in true crime. These three dissimilar people all end up involved in a real-life crime event and must work to uncover the truth while getting to know each other.

Steve Martin plays Charles, an actor who once played a detective in a popular television show. After a real murder happens in his building, Charles tries to use his knowledge of detective techniques combined with the tidbits he’s gleaned from true crime podcasts to try to solve the case. 

Some of us in the building can't believe these three made it on TV! https://t.co/j9I9EioxnQ

Steve Martin is well known for playing bumbling, well-intentioned characters, like George Banks in Father of the Bride. However, it seems that the character of Charles might actually be the closest in personality to Martin himself. In a recent interview with ET Canada from its YouTube channel, Martin opened up about the similarities between himself and Charles, admitting that he’s a voracious consumer of true-crime TV shows as well as radio programs, just like Charles. He’s a “podcast freak,” his good friend and co-star Martin Short joked. “It’s not the horror of it, it’s the solving that I find to be so interesting,” Martin revealed, “The modern way of solving (the case).” 

Additionally, Martin has played several detectives in film and television, including, most notably, Inspector Jacques Clouseau in the 2006 film The Pink Panther and its sequel in 2009. With so much experience in every medium, Martin was undoubtedly able to draw on his own decades of experience as an actor to accurately play Charles, an aging actor who sometimes feels disillusioned by the entertainment business but still loves his work, despite it all. 

A true-crime podcast obsession turns dangerous in 'Only Murders In the Building.' https://t.co/mZmWwqBYFZ

Steve Martin not only plays one of the leading roles in Only Murders in the Building, but he was instrumental in the show’s creation as well, writing the initial idea and script outline with John Hoffman. For Martin, the opportunity to appear in the show, which will not only debut on Hulu, but Disney+ as well, is a chance to appeal to a whole new audience of younger viewers. In fact, some viewers might discover him through this new show and get interested in his body of work for the first time.

It’s too early to tell how Only Murders in the Building will be received, but all signs point to the show becoming a huge hit. Stay tuned to Showbiz Cheat Sheet for all the latest entertainment news!

Only Murders in the Building is an upcoming Hulu series that is already generating a lot of buzz among pop culture fans, even though it isn’t set to start streaming until August 31, 2021. The show, which features a stellar cast of both comedy legends and music icons, has been in development for quite some time. Even though the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic delayed production a bit, the show wrapped in early 2021. Only Murders in the Building stars Steve Martin and Martin Short, two comedy icons who have been in the entertainment business for decades. In a rare twist of fate, Steve Martin actually shares several similarities to the character he plays in the show, as he admitted in a recent interview with ET Canada. 

Steve Martin is a multi-talented star who has appeared in everything from television and movie productions to stage and theater shows. Still, his role in Only Murders in the Building is unlike anything he’s ever done before. The Hulu show tells the story of three strangers who all share an interest in true crime. These three dissimilar people all end up involved in a real-life crime event and must work to uncover the truth while getting to know each other.

Steve Martin plays Charles, an actor who once played a detective in a popular television show. After a real murder happens in his building, Charles tries to use his knowledge of detective techniques combined with the tidbits he’s gleaned from true crime podcasts to try to solve the case. 

Some of us in the building can't believe these three made it on TV! https://t.co/j9I9EioxnQ

Steve Martin is well known for playing bumbling, well-intentioned characters, like George Banks in Father of the Bride. However, it seems that the character of Charles might actually be the closest in personality to Martin himself. In a recent interview with ET Canada from its YouTube channel, Martin opened up about the similarities between himself and Charles, admitting that he’s a voracious consumer of true-crime TV shows as well as radio programs, just like Charles. He’s a “podcast freak,” his good friend and co-star Martin Short joked. “It’s not the horror of it, it’s the solving that I find to be so interesting,” Martin revealed, “The modern way of solving (the case).” 

Additionally, Martin has played several detectives in film and television, including, most notably, Inspector Jacques Clouseau in the 2006 film The Pink Panther and its sequel in 2009. With so much experience in every medium, Martin was undoubtedly able to draw on his own decades of experience as an actor to accurately play Charles, an aging actor who sometimes feels disillusioned by the entertainment business but still loves his work, despite it all. 

A true-crime podcast obsession turns dangerous in 'Only Murders In the Building.' https://t.co/mZmWwqBYFZ

Steve Martin not only plays one of the leading roles in Only Murders in the Building, but he was instrumental in the show’s creation as well, writing the initial idea and script outline with John Hoffman. For Martin, the opportunity to appear in the show, which will not only debut on Hulu, but Disney+ as well, is a chance to appeal to a whole new audience of younger viewers. In fact, some viewers might discover him through this new show and get interested in his body of work for the first time.

It’s too early to tell how Only Murders in the Building will be received, but all signs point to the show becoming a huge hit. Stay tuned to Showbiz Cheat Sheet for all the latest entertainment news!

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