Suda51 Director's Cut No More Heroes 3 Launch Trailer Is Quite a Bit Crazier

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Twinfinite 28 August, 2021 - 10:57am 20 views

Is No More Heroes 3 the last game?

No More Heroes fans got some bittersweet news today. With the release of No More Heroes 3 today, which got a Eurogamer Recommended badge and an overwhelmingly positive review, its creator, Goichi Suda, announced the game will be the last in the series. Eurogamer.netNo More Heroes creator says the series is over

10 Minutes Of No More Heroes 3 Gameplay

GameSpot Trailers 28 August, 2021 - 11:40pm

No More Heroes 3 Review

IGN 28 August, 2021 - 11:40pm

No More Heroes Series Is Officially Over

ComicBook.com 28 August, 2021 - 10:57am

After years of anticipation from many fans, No More Heroes 3 finally released on Nintendo Switch this week, bringing about the much-requested third mainline installment in the action-adventure series. And while this release might seem like one that would kickstart a new series of No More Heroes titles to arrive in the coming years, the franchise's creator has now made it known that no further games will be coming about.

To coincide with the launch of No More Heroes 3, famed director Goichi "Suda51" Suda took to social media to share a message with fans regarding the state of the series. Specifically, Suda made clear that No More Heroes 3 marks the official end of the franchise. "As one journey ends, the crimson bike falls into a deep sleep," Suda said in a message on Twitter. "Goodbye, Travis, Goodbye, No More Heroes."

As a whole, many fans in response didn't seem to be too caught off guard by this announcement from Suda. Even though some were saddened to see that No More Heroes would officially not be continuing onward, others seemed to infer that No More Heroes 3 might end up being the final entry in the series before it even released. In response, a number of fans thanked Suda and the team at Grasshopper Manufacture for creating this beloved series in the first place.

If you're looking to play the No More Heroes series for yourself, the whole franchise is now readily available to experience on Nintendo Switch. And if you're someone who is purely looking to jump straight into No More Heroes 3, you can check out our review of the latest installment in the franchise right here.

How do you feel about No More Heroes coming to an end? And have you had the chance to play No More Heroes 3 for yourself yet? Let me know either down in the comments or over on Twitter at @MooreMan12.

Copyright 2021 ComicBook.com. All rights reserved.

No More Heroes 3: How to Beat Sonic Juice

GameRant 27 August, 2021 - 03:21pm

Once players come face to face with Sonic Juice, they may think that they're about to start a normal boss encounter, but Sonic Juice isn't a fan of action combat, so he instead challenges Travis Touchdown to a traditional turn-based battle, similar to Final Fantasy. Players will suddenly have a command menu to choose from, as well as an HP bar and battery level for their weapon.

With the command menu, players have several options here. They can choose to Fight, which is a normal attack; they can use Magic, attempt to summon a powerful monster, charge their battery, use a No More Heroes 3 item, or run away from the boss fight.

No More Heroes 3 players can bring an end to this fight by attacking the command windows instead of the boss. Once Travis' command windows are destroyed, a cutscene will happen, and then players will transition over to a real boss fight with Sonic Juice, and it's much easier. Players just need to slash away at Sonic Juice when they are close to the stage. Avoid as many of their attacks as possible and keep doing damage to being the ranked match to an end.

If any players are having trouble defeating the boss without losing, make sure to buy healing sushi items from the sushi vendor before the fight. There's no way to change No More Heroes 3's difficulty, so players will have to stick with their choice, no matter how difficult.

No More Heroes 3 is now available as a Nintendo Switch exclusive.

No More Heroes 3: How to Beat Sonic Juice

GamingBolt 27 August, 2021 - 03:21pm

Once players come face to face with Sonic Juice, they may think that they're about to start a normal boss encounter, but Sonic Juice isn't a fan of action combat, so he instead challenges Travis Touchdown to a traditional turn-based battle, similar to Final Fantasy. Players will suddenly have a command menu to choose from, as well as an HP bar and battery level for their weapon.

With the command menu, players have several options here. They can choose to Fight, which is a normal attack; they can use Magic, attempt to summon a powerful monster, charge their battery, use a No More Heroes 3 item, or run away from the boss fight.

No More Heroes 3 players can bring an end to this fight by attacking the command windows instead of the boss. Once Travis' command windows are destroyed, a cutscene will happen, and then players will transition over to a real boss fight with Sonic Juice, and it's much easier. Players just need to slash away at Sonic Juice when they are close to the stage. Avoid as many of their attacks as possible and keep doing damage to being the ranked match to an end.

If any players are having trouble defeating the boss without losing, make sure to buy healing sushi items from the sushi vendor before the fight. There's no way to change No More Heroes 3's difficulty, so players will have to stick with their choice, no matter how difficult.

No More Heroes 3 is now available as a Nintendo Switch exclusive.

No More Heroes 3 review - Suda's series back at its wonky best

Eurogamer.net 27 August, 2021 - 05:52am

The open world returns, as does so much of that scattershot humour, in this uneven but enjoyable sequel.

In one of the many, many, many fourth-wall breaking interludes in No More Heroes 3, series star Travis Touchdown guests on a TV show to discuss his deep love and appreciation for the work of Takashi Miike, Japanese cinema's most prolific, varied and plain wildest of directors. It's another self-indulgent pop culture reference in a series that's awash with them, but there's something different here - the sense that series creator Goichi Suda aligns himself somewhat with Miike.

It's something underlined when Travis goes into an extended rant about how a director like Miike - a man whose most notorious film has its opening title spelled out in a splash of semen - went on to create the idol series Girl x Heroines in order to strengthen his production crew. It's something Suda himself did with Travis Strikes Again, the stripped back spin-off he used to educate his young team before they set to work on a No More Heroes game proper.

I detested that particular game for leaning into the excesses of the series while lacking so much of its style, and yet here I am absolutely adoring No More Heroes 3. So what's changed? Well, it helps that this is a proper No More Heroes game, returning to the over-the-shoulder action that sees Travis scythe through small mobs and tackle screen-filling bosses. It's even more of a No More Heroes game than 2010's sequel, with the open world sections that were excised for No More Heroes 2 restored, and with some style too.

The set-up is familiar, but - somehow, and to Suda's credit - even more outrageous than what's gone before. In a cute animated pastiche of 80s Spielberg schmaltz, a kid befriends a fluffy alien called Fu and helps him return to his home planet with the promise that one day he'll return. Return he does some 20 odd years later, only this time he's grown into an obnoxious, extravagant (and, I have to say, exquisitely designed) alien who's hellbent on anarchy, and has brought a gaggle of extraterrestrials from the prison he's just enjoyed a spell at along for the ride.

And so begins Travis's quest to bring them all down one by one until he's confirmed as the number one assassin. The same as it ever was, then, only this time out the stakes are that much higher - and the action, in tandem, is that little bit more extreme. After the ultra streamlined Travis Strikes Again, I sort of forgot how much I enjoyed No More Heroes' particular brand of action too - simple yet satisfying and delivered with screen-filling overexuberance, that signature beam katana playing its part in show-stopping Death Blows and the combat emboldened by a handful of neat additions.

Indeed, one of them's lifted straight from Travis Strikes Again - maybe I was too mean on it after all - with a Death Glove that can be equipped with three different skills to provide some welcome variety, though more importantly Travis can also now go 'Full Armor', donning a mech suit (complete with 'Henshin' battle cry, of course) that ramps things up to an enjoyable degree.

That mech suit cameos in the shooting defense missions, one of an array of mini-games that can be found in the returning open world. It is, as fans of the first game may well be reassured to learn, a fairly dismal open world - part satire on the form, and partly because there's that persistent feeling that No More Heroes 3's been made on some backlot on the cheap by a crew buzzing on cheap beer and cheaper hash.

Which, of course, is part of the series' charm - divisive as it may be. The bleached out Santa Destroy, with its empty streets and bare backlots all of its own, feels by either accident or design like it's nailed something of Philip K. Dick's California in its baked banality, and No More Heroes 3's world - divided neatly into five areas, and easily explored on Travis' overstated big red bike - retains all that while performing markedly better than its notoriously leaden predecessor. Which isn't to say it's pretty - far from it - but it's at least functional this time around.

I don't think you go to a No More Heroes game for a technical showcase, though, and rather for the gonzo stylings of Grasshopper Manufacture and Suda himself - and that's something No More Heroes 3 delivers in giddy excess. Whether it grates or titilates is down so much to personal taste - or maybe even your mood - and with an extended runtime over its predecessors there's every chance that this will test the patience of even diehard fans.

And yet I sort of loved it. Does it move the No More Heroes formula in any meaningful way? Not really, and the trims and tucks and small additions don't exactly add up to ten years' progress. Does it spark and pop - and more than occasionally misfire - with all the vim and swagger of those original games? That it does, and fulsomely. This is a return to more full-blooded, frantic and outrageously over-the-top action, a game that's obnoxious, inventive and wildly inconsistent - chalk this one up as one of Suda's better works, though, and arguably the best of the No More Heroes series to date.

Martin is Eurogamer's features and reviews editor. He has a Gradius 2 arcade board and likes to play racing games with special boots and gloves on.

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No More Heroes 3 review | Is Travis' latest adventure a touchdown?

VG247 27 August, 2021 - 03:12am

Is Travis' latest adventure a touchdown? Find out in our No More Heroes 3 review!

At this point, the No More Heroes series and developer Grasshopper Manufacture in general has garnered a well-deserved reputation for strikingly original parody.

By blending zany, tongue-in-cheek humor with a semi-serious punky aesthetic and over-the-top action the studio has created a trademark style that lights up the eyes of just about every nerdy 15-year-old or nerdy-15-year-old-at-heart that sees it.

Fans have been waiting more than ten years for No More Heroes 3, which is a hell of a run up to stick the landing. But genuinely, it’s hard to think of how it could’ve been executed any better.

Building on the work we saw in the stopgap collection of mini-games, Travis Strikes Again, No More Heroes 3’s use of multimedia is fantastic, incorporating mini-games, different styles of animation, and genre parodies to create a game that’s teeming with joyously creative flourishes and set pieces.

Whether it's VHS vaporwave aesthetic or rainbow-colored overlays when you’re interacting with objects or in cutscenes, photorealistic petals covering the screen as it transitions, or an imitation Netflix autoplay filter between chapters of the game’s story, it feels like there’s always something grin-inducingly goofy and cool and silly going on.

The story this time around raises the stakes to galactic proportions, with Travis facing off against deadly alien assassins as he rises through the ranks to reach number one.

And where you might think a cult series returning after a decade might tie up a few loose ends just in case, in true No More Heroes fashion the narrative is hilariously unfocused, blowing a raspberry in the face of anyone who wanted to get too po-faced about the pre-existing lore.

However, one place where it does feel like the series has matured is in the gameplay grunt it has to back up the funnies. It now feels like there’s more fluidity to the hack-and-slash combat, with more options when engaging opponents, that stops things from feeling as one-paced as they could have.

Signature wrestling moves are fun to pull off on stunned targets, while DeathGlove special moves even the odds against increasingly difficult extraterrestrial enemies.

Draining an alien’s health bar lets you unleash a killing blow quick-time-event, which again fits in nicely with the flow of battle, but also sets off a slot-machine wheel spinning, which gives you random bonuses in battle.

One of these bonuses is an Iron Man-style suit of ultra-powerful armor - because superheroes are popular now - which is pretty much a skip button for whatever fight you’re in.

It’s a good mix of systems that helps to keep the regular encounters engaging and the boss battles booming.

And it’s in those boss encounters that No More Heroes 3 is at its best, with each set piece consistently delivering the unexpected.

However, it’s in between these showpiece encounters that the game starts to slip. To qualify for each ranking battle, you have to plug your way through a series of smaller fights called Designated Matches and complete mini-games to earn enough money to progress.

A gag in the previous No More Heroes games was that Travis earned money to enter the extravagant boss battles by completing really mundane tasks like mowing the lawn and collecting trash - and those mini-games return in abundance.

There are a few more exciting ones to complete in No More Heroes 3, but it does feel like a grind to collect all of the cash, character upgrade resources, and Designated Match crystals you need in fairly pedestrian fashion - even when you’re zooming through the sparse semi-open world on an Akira trike.

I understand the fan service of bringing the minigames and open-world filler back, and to have some downtime between big encounters to pad the length - but are they really in here because they’re good or just because they were in the old games?

With that said, aside from the grind, No More Heroes 3 achieves a difficult task. There’s a tightrope to walk with parody games, and ‘funny’ games in general.

Everyone’s going in expecting madcap mayhem, and there’s often no one more stony-faced than someone sitting with their arms folded waiting to laugh. But if nothing else, Grasshopper Manufacture’s latest knows how to make you crack a smile.

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