T-Mobile Investigating Claims of Massive Data Breach – Krebs on Security

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Krebs on Security 16 August, 2021 - 07:00pm 35 views

T-Mobile says it found unauthorized access to data

Reuters 16 August, 2021 - 09:10pm

A woman sued legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan in a New York court for allegedly sexually abusing her when she was a 12-year-old girl in the 1960s.

Dylan's spokesman called the allegations "untrue," and said that the lawsuit filed Friday in Manhattan Supreme Court "will be vigorously defended" by lawyers for the singer.

The lawsuit was first reported by The New York Post.

The suit was filed a day before the expiration of a one-year window opened by a New York state law, the Child Victim's Act, which allowed adults to sue for alleged child sexual abuse no matter when the purported conduct occurred.

The lawsuit claims the now-80-year-old Dylan over a six-week period in April and May 1965 "befriended and established an emotional connection with" the girl to groom her to be sexually molested.

The Manhattan Supreme Court suit says Dylan, whose legal name is Robert Zimmerman, "exploited his status as a musician to provide" the girl "with alcohol and drugs and sexually abuse her multiple times."

The complaint also accuses him of threatening physical violence against her, and left her "emotionally scarred and psychologically damaged to this day." And it says the girl, who in April 1965 had just turned age 12, suffered physical injuries.

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The lawsuit said the multi-Grammy-Award-winning singer allegedly abused the girl at certain times in his apartment at the Hotel Chelsea, a then-seedy hotel in Manhattan that has landmark status due to its architecture and famous clientele.

Dylan is known to have kept an apartment at the Hotel Chelsea, which is named after its neighborhood, from 1961 through 1964, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. He also stayed there in fall 1965 to write songs for his album "Blonde on Blonde."

Dylan also did a short tour of cities in England from April 30, 1965, through May 10, 1965, footage of which was used by film director D.A. Pennebaker in his documentary "Don't Look Back."

The lawsuit specifically says that "upon information and belief," Dylan "maintained an apartment" of the Hotel Chelsea between April and May 1965, the time period during which the abuse is alleged to have happened.

The criminal statue of limitations for Dylan's alleged abuse of the girl is long expired.

The woman who sued Dylan is identified in the lawsuit by the initials J.C.

The complaint says the accuser currently is living in Greenwich, Connecticut.

The suit alleges assault, battery, false imprisonment, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. It asks for unspecified monetary damages.

The plaintiff's lawyer, Daniel Isaacs, when asked for comment, said, "The complaint speaks for itself and we shall prove our allegations in a court of law."

Dylan, who wrote the iconic 60s songs "Blowin' in the Wind," "The Times They Are a-Changing," and "Like a Rolling Stone," is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, an Academy Award-winning songwriter, a winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In 2016, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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MORNING BUSINESS REPORT: Used car prices, food stamp increases, T-Mobile data breach

WFSB 3 16 August, 2021 - 09:10pm

A woman sued legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan in a New York court for allegedly sexually abusing her when she was a 12-year-old girl in the 1960s.

Dylan's spokesman called the allegations "untrue," and said that the lawsuit filed Friday in Manhattan Supreme Court "will be vigorously defended" by lawyers for the singer.

The lawsuit was first reported by The New York Post.

The suit was filed a day before the expiration of a one-year window opened by a New York state law, the Child Victim's Act, which allowed adults to sue for alleged child sexual abuse no matter when the purported conduct occurred.

The lawsuit claims the now-80-year-old Dylan over a six-week period in April and May 1965 "befriended and established an emotional connection with" the girl to groom her to be sexually molested.

The Manhattan Supreme Court suit says Dylan, whose legal name is Robert Zimmerman, "exploited his status as a musician to provide" the girl "with alcohol and drugs and sexually abuse her multiple times."

The complaint also accuses him of threatening physical violence against her, and left her "emotionally scarred and psychologically damaged to this day." And it says the girl, who in April 1965 had just turned age 12, suffered physical injuries.

Read more of CNBC's politics coverage:

The lawsuit said the multi-Grammy-Award-winning singer allegedly abused the girl at certain times in his apartment at the Hotel Chelsea, a then-seedy hotel in Manhattan that has landmark status due to its architecture and famous clientele.

Dylan is known to have kept an apartment at the Hotel Chelsea, which is named after its neighborhood, from 1961 through 1964, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. He also stayed there in fall 1965 to write songs for his album "Blonde on Blonde."

Dylan also did a short tour of cities in England from April 30, 1965, through May 10, 1965, footage of which was used by film director D.A. Pennebaker in his documentary "Don't Look Back."

The lawsuit specifically says that "upon information and belief," Dylan "maintained an apartment" of the Hotel Chelsea between April and May 1965, the time period during which the abuse is alleged to have happened.

The criminal statue of limitations for Dylan's alleged abuse of the girl is long expired.

The woman who sued Dylan is identified in the lawsuit by the initials J.C.

The complaint says the accuser currently is living in Greenwich, Connecticut.

The suit alleges assault, battery, false imprisonment, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. It asks for unspecified monetary damages.

The plaintiff's lawyer, Daniel Isaacs, when asked for comment, said, "The complaint speaks for itself and we shall prove our allegations in a court of law."

Dylan, who wrote the iconic 60s songs "Blowin' in the Wind," "The Times They Are a-Changing," and "Like a Rolling Stone," is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, an Academy Award-winning songwriter, a winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

In 2016, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Got a confidential news tip? We want to hear from you.

Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC delivered to your inbox

Get this delivered to your inbox, and more info about our products and services. 

Data is a real-time snapshot *Data is delayed at least 15 minutes. Global Business and Financial News, Stock Quotes, and Market Data and Analysis.

T-Mobile Confirms It Was Hacked

VICE 16 August, 2021 - 09:10pm

The move comes after Motherboard reported that T-Mobile was investigating a post on an underground forum offering for sale Social Security Numbers and other private data. The forum post at the time didn't name T-Mobile, but the seller told Motherboard the data came from T-Mobile servers.

"We have determined that unauthorized access to some T-Mobile data occurred, however we have not yet determined that there is any personal customer data involved," T-Mobile wrote in its new announcement. "This investigation will take some time but we are working with the highest degree of urgency. Until we have completed this assessment we cannot confirm the reported number of records affected or the validity of statements made by others," the announcement added.

The seller told Motherboard that 100 million people had their data compromised in the breach. In the forum post, they were offering data on 30 million people for 6 bitcoin, or around $270,000.

They told Motherboard at the time that T-Mobile had seemingly kicked them out of the company's networks. T-Mobile's announcement corroborates that somewhat, saying, "We are confident that the entry point used to gain access has been closed, and we are continuing our deep technical review of the situation across our systems to identify the nature of any data that was illegally accessed."

Motherboard has seen samples of the data, and confirmed they contained accurate information on T-Mobile customers. The data includes social security numbers, phone numbers, names, physical addresses, unique IMEI numbers, and driver license information, the seller said.

"We have been working around the clock to investigate claims being made that T-Mobile data may have been illegally accessed. We take the protection of our customers very seriously and we are conducting an extensive analysis alongside digital forensic experts to understand the validity of these claims, and we are coordinating with law enforcement," T-Mobile's announcement added.

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T-Mobile Slammed After Hackers Reportedly Swipe 100 Million Customer Records

Investor's Business Daily 16 August, 2021 - 03:03pm

T-Mobile stock toppled to a three-month low Monday after a hacker reportedly claimed to be selling personal data from more than 100 million customers.

Vice's Motherboard first reported the incident on Sunday. In an underground forum, a seller claimed to have obtained social security numbers, phone numbers, names, physical addresses, unique phone data and driver's license numbers for 100 million people. Data came from T-Mobile's (TMUS) servers, the seller reportedly told Motherboard.

The seller is asking for 6 bitcoin, or about $270,000, for a section of the data containing 30 million social security numbers and driver's licenses. The seller reportedly plans to sell rest of the data privately.

In response, T-Mobile stock slumped 2.9% to 140.73 on the stock market today.

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T-Mobile didn't respond to a request for comment from Investor's Business Daily. But the company emailed a response to MarketWatch.

"We are aware of claims made in an underground forum and have been actively investigating their validity," a T-Mobile spokesperson said. "We do not have any additional information to share at this time."

The seller told Motherboard that T-Mobile already kicked them out of the servers, but not before downloading the data.

At one point during the regular session, T-Mobile stock touched its lowest point since May. That month, shares broke out of a flat base with a buy point at 135.64, according to MarketSmith.com.

The reported hack is one of the biggest for T-Mobile in recent history. If confirmed, it would account for nearly all of T-Mobile's U.S. customers. In the second quarter, the telecom giant reportedly had nearly 105 million customers in the U.S., according to FactSet.

Earlier this year, T-Mobile disclosed a smaller hack, saying cybersecurity experts helped it detect the invasion. T-Mobile stock fell 1.8% that day in January.

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