'Ted Lasso' Recap, Season 2, Episode 7, 'Headspace'

Entertainment

NPR 03 September, 2021 - 02:00am 15 views

CM Punk was on WFAN New York this morning as part of his media tour to promote this Sunday’s AEW All Out pay-per-view.

Punk was asked if Bryan Danielson appearing in AEW is a forgone conclusion. Punk did not directly answer the question but what he said pretty much confirms that Danielson is on his way.

Punk said, “Listen, 7 years I was gone, if you told me who is the one guy that could get you back to wrestling, you can just have one match with him it would be him. I don’t know if that answer’s your question or not. But the guy was in the WrestleMania main event 6 months ago so that would be a huge acquisition. I think he could do everything he wants to do. For a guy like me and him, pro wrestling is art. This is our art.”

It is widely believed that Danielson will be making his debut this Sunday night at All Out on pay-per-view. The show can be purchased via FITE TV internationally and on the Bleacher Report app in the United States.

Danielson last wrestled at WrestleMania in a Triple Threat match with Edge and WWE Universal Champion Roman Reigns. His contract expired shortly thereafter.

Copyright © 2021. WrestlingNews.Co. All Rights Reserved.

Read full article at NPR

'Ted Lasso': Roy & Keeley Hit a Rough Patch in 'Headspace' (RECAP)

TV Insider 03 September, 2021 - 08:30am

“The truth will set you free. But first, it’ll piss you off.”

Those wise words come from Dr. Fieldstone (Sarah Niles), who speaks them to Ted (Jason Sudeikis) in his third (!) therapy session. Appointments one and two? Yeah, they don’t go well. But in “Headspace,” her statement also applies to Roy (Brett Goldstein), who hits a rough patch with Keeley (Juno Temple) without fully understanding her side of things. Eventually, he does get it — but first, in true Roy fashion, he’s just pissed off.

Meanwhile, all the attention Nate is getting after Richmond won its quarterfinal starts to go to his head, and Rebecca (Hannah Waddingham) struggles with whether she wants to meet her perfect-guy Bantr match, who we now know is Sam (Toheeb Jimoh).

Ted heads to his first appointment with Dr. Fieldstone, but after several minutes of rambling — about the couch, about the trinkets on the doc’s desk, about the pollen count in the U.K. — he gets up and says, “I can’t do this.” The following day, he goes back… but that only ends in an impassioned rant against therapy, so, yeah, Ted needs time. He goes to Dr. Fieldstone the next day, and she tells him she was offended by what he said — just because she is being paid to listen to her patients doesn’t mean she doesn’t care about them, just like he cares about his players but is being paid to coach. Ted apologizes for his behavior, but Sharon shrugs it off, saying it happens. “Fight or flight is a natural response,” she says. “You just happened to do both.”

Meanwhile, Keeley’s struggling in her relationship with Roy. Now that Roy’s working for Richmond, she can’t get space from him: He’s there when she wakes up in the morning, when she gets her breakfast, when she gets coffee, etc. After an argument stemming from Roy’s excitement about the book he was reading — and his need to inform Keeley about it as she tries to watch TV — he gets his jacket and slams the door. Thankfully, Roy begins to understand as he goes about his coaching duties; a botched play from Jamie (Phil Dunster) makes Roy realize that sometimes players — and girlfriends! — need space. He goes back to Keeley and apologizes (drawing her a bath and leaving her alone — swoon!), and all is well.

Nate’s (Nick Mohammed) gotten a bit of a big head since winning the match and being deemed “The Wonder Kid” (which originated from him fumbling the term “wunderkind” in his first post-game interview). He’s also frustrated because his father doesn’t think much of his accomplishments — and that cocktail of triumph and despair explodes as he berates Colin (Billy Harris), who’d told a joke at his expense the other day.

“You’re like a painting at Holiday Inn,” Nate tells the already-insecure player. “You don’t inspire, you don’t move people. You’re there. You do the job, so just do the job.” Ouch. Coach Beard (Brendan Hunt) thinks it was over the line, too. “You were rude to Colin,” he says, confronting him in his office. “It was personal, and weird. Do better.” Nate apologizes to Colin in front of the team and lands at the center of a group hug… but later, after being given kit that says “Wonder Kid,” Nate takes it as an insult and threatens the new kit man, who had the idea for the gift. “If you ever do anything to humiliate me again, I’ll make your life f–king misery,” he says, giving him the kit back and slamming the door behind him. Yikes, Nate. Yikes.

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Ted Lasso Recap: The Problem With Being a Wonder Kid

Vulture 03 September, 2021 - 05:00am

Witness Roy and Keeley, who are stuck in a frustrating pattern, even if only one of them knows it as the episode begins. Keeley loves Roy, but she’s come to realize she doesn’t need to see him all the time: in bed, in the bathroom, at work, at the café at work, in the kit room at work, on the floor when she’s just trying to watch Sex and the City. It’s a lot. (“He’s here, he’s there, he’s every-fucking-where: Roy Kent.”) It’s understandable, as she consults an ever-widening circle of friends — who occasionally cover their conversation with impromptu scat singing — everyone else seems to understand it, too.

Everyone except Roy, that is, who’s deeply hurt by Keeley’s revelation that he’s just way too up in her business too often. They fight, and it plays like a real fight, the kind where those on both sides of the argument don’t really want to be fighting, but neither will back down. Their rift doesn’t last that long, however. The next day it’s Jamie Tartt, of all people, who accidentally makes Roy realize what he’s doing wrong. Roy’s not giving Keeley enough space. (Which she essentially told him, but he couldn’t hear it for some reason.) One candlelight bubble bath and the promise of alone time later, all is well.

On Ted Lasso, some problems have simple resolutions. Roy’s and Keeley’s tiff didn’t suggest deeper problems in their relationship and seemed destined to be just a blip. Roy got stuck in a pattern that was detrimental to his relationship, recognized it, and changed his behavior. He wasn’t trapped in a time loop, à la Bill Murray in Groundhog Day, but sometimes you don’t need to have a run-in with the supernatural to get stuck in a rut. He saw what he was doing and got out.

For others, it’s not as easy. Ted makes three visits to Doc Sharon’s office over the course of the episode but only manages to stick around on the final try. During the first, he nervously engages in banter and bits as he tries to get comfortable, rejecting all possible positions, even the classic flat-on-the-couch “like you see in The New Yorker” pose. When Sharon asks him point-blank what happened when he fled the game, he flees again. The second visit goes even worse. Ted, in an uncharacteristically hostile mood, insults Sharon. But not just Sharon. He insults the occupation of therapy itself, accusing her of not really caring because she gets paid to listen to others’ problems. It’s harsh, and she rightly takes offense.

The third visit, however, seems to mark a turning point. We don’t get to see what Sharon and Ted talk about, and, at this point, it doesn’t really matter. Last episode’s watershed moment came when Ted walked through the door of Sharon’s office and admitted he needed help. In some ways, this is bigger. He’s committed to sticking around and seeing therapy through, knowing the loneliness and anger he’s feeling as a divorcé miles away from the life he used to know will not go away. Like Roy, he saw himself engaging in destructive behavior and repeating the same mistakes, and he pulled out of it. But for Ted, the stakes are even higher, and this is just the beginning of the process.

At least the episode leaves Ted in a better place than Nate, who’s spiraling into darkness. While it’s kind of shocking to see Nate end an episode berating the sweet Will (Charlie Hiscock), who’s replaced him as the team’s kit man, Nate’s been heading in this direction most of the season. His insecurity goes much deeper than his inability to secure a reservation at Taste of Athens, and he has a need for validation that his “Wonder Kid” success has seemingly only deepened.

In some ways, it’s a remarkably sharp heel turn from the meek kid we met in season one. But, in retrospect, it now looks like he’s been headed in this direction all along. Season two has fleshed out Nate’s backstory and home life, and it’s not hard to see the source of his deep need for approval, something his father refuses to give him in even meager amounts. As the episode opens, Nate has made the papers for being an awesome coach and even that doesn’t move the needle. “They say humility is not thinking less of yourself but thinking about yourself less,” he tells Nate. That may be true, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy success even a little bit.

So Nate looks elsewhere: to the press, which is now talking about how he deserves his own team, and to social media, which is echoing some of those same suggestions (except when it’s offering up crushing insults). As harsh as Nate’s father’s approach is, he’s not wrong about Nate’s need for a little bit of humility. Nate’s jump in status has made him cocky and callous on the field and cruel when dressing down Colin in his office. To be fair, Colin was the ringleader of Nate’s tormentors, and it’s hard to let that go. So he lets Colin have it, likening him to a painting at a Holiday Inn.

Coach Beard overhears this and gives Nate a dressing down of his own, which he seems to take to heart. He apologizes to Colin in front of the whole team — who know all about the incident even though it took place behind closed doors because that’s how tight they’ve become — and Colin accepts the apology. Hugs. All is well.

Except it’s not. There’s no sincerity to Nate’s apology, even if it seems to fly (even with Coach Beard). Now driven by a combination of narcissism (he can’t even admit he said “Wonder Kid” instead of “wunderkind”), he takes it out on Will, who went to the trouble of having a custom “Wonder Kid” jersey made in his honor, though Nate sees that as an attempt to humiliate him. It’s ugly. Where is this going? That’s unclear. But right now, it’s going nowhere good.

Largely away from all this mess, Rebecca contemplates her future with her Bantr match, still not realizing it’s Sam. The episode features a cute scene in which they bump into each other while glued to their phones. When Sam tells her the moment reminds him phones make it so that people have “never been so connected but never further apart,” Rebecca realizes she was thinking the same thing. They do have nice chemistry together, but Sam’s friendly politeness alone suggests the boss/team-member relationship would be a hurdle to any relationship. (That and Rebecca not being sure how she feels about Ratatouille being her match’s favorite film.) Regardless, both Sam and Rebecca have cheering sections encouraging the blind relationship. The whole team is pushing Sam to make the connection while Rebecca turns to a small council of Keeley and Higgins.

What will become of it remains a big TBD. In fact, much of “Headspace” leaves viewers hanging about the fate of its plot strands. Will Ted be able to confront what’s going on inside him? Will Nate continue his descent into prickdom? Is there a future to this Bantr match? All that, and the Greyhounds’ season remains on the line, even if the episode largely ignores that. Football is life, sure, but there’s more to life than just football.

• Roy reading Dan Brown and being shocked by plot twists most readers knew about a decade ago is the episode’s best running gag. In his defense, he has been busy.

• That said, the season’s best subtle running gag might be Dutch newcomer Jan Maas’s (David Elsendoorn) inability to speak without absolute frankness, which pops up a couple of times this episode: once when Nate insists he said “wunderkind,” and once when Jamie is trying to explain his moves on the field to Roy.

• Per the credits, Will the kit man’s full name is “Will Kitman.”

• Ted Lasso is lucky to have Nick Mohammed, who has the acting chops to steer Nate through some potentially choppy waters and play his recent turn as part of his personality all along, and not as a Mr. Hyde emerging unexpectedly from Dr. Jekyll.

'Ted Lasso' Recap: Ted Can't Move On, But Can He Sit Still?

Gizmodo 03 September, 2021 - 02:00am

Roy learns to back off, Ted learns to follow through, and Nate can't stop grasping, in an episode about being strong enough not to hang on so tight.

We left Ted at what seemed to be a turning point last week: Following his panic attack, he showed up in Dr. Sharon's office and told her he needed some help. But getting yourself to cooperate with therapy isn't a matter of a simple revelation, necessarily, and Ted finds that in the light of day, he's once again not so sure. He tells Sharon he thinks he doesn't need help after all, but she tells him to sit down. After a couple of minutes of fidgeting, though, he's out the door. His next attempt ends with him insulting Sharon's entire profession and telling her it's dishonest to charge by the hour when she does 50-minute appointments, claiming that she doesn't actually care about her patients.

Finally, on his third try, she tells him that she doesn't appreciate his attitude, particularly given that he is also paid to do a job in which he still legitimately cares about people. This brings Ted around a bit, and he finally sits down across from her to talk.

Roy Kent is very, very in love right now. He rolls over in bed and gazes at Keeley. He finds her in the kitchen and gazes at her. She heads out to grab a coffee at work and he wants to come with her. Keeley admits to Rebecca and Higgins that it's a lot of togetherness since they've been living and working together — maybe too much. After a couple of near-misses and a blow-up brought about by Sex And The City, Roy figures out that Keeley's been complaining to other people about the relationship, and he's embarrassed that rather than being about regular annoyances, it's about him being too attached. This makes him feel foolish, and that's hard for a guy who, up until recently, didn't have the tools to be vulnerable enough to be in this position at all.

Fortunately for Roy, he knows a guy who has the answer, although not on purpose: Jamie. During practice, Roy criticizes Jamie for being too far away from a teammate, and Jamie says that what the teammate needed from him was space. Space, Roy! I have to trust my teammate! Roy gets it, and he goes home and sets up a relaxing bath for Keeley, completely with purloined petals and Sade. When she gets home, he settles her into it and promises to be gone for three hours. And it's a good lesson: Sometimes you just need a minute to yourself. Or three hours in a tub full of roses.

Nate is still on a high after being named the coaching "Wonder Kid" (a malapropism of a nickname he still can't admit he gave himself). It's all he wants to talk about. His mother, busting with pride, wants to indulge him; his father, clearly a tough sell in any circumstance, doesn't want him to get a big head.

But a big head, unfortunately, is precisely what Nathan now has, and he's ready to graduate from taking his frustrations out on Will to taking them out on Colin. After Colin senses that Nate doesn't like him and asks what's wrong, Nate delivers to Colin a withering, unprofessional, mean-spirited lecture that seems completely misdirected. When Beard shows up to quietly but firmly state that Nate needs to stop picking on Colin, Nate delivers a nice apology and it seems like things are going well again. But not so fast: Nate just redirects his anger toward poor Will again.

When Ted is uncomfortable, he deflects. He dances, sometimes literally. The sequence in which Jason Sudeikis sits in the soft chair, then moves to the couch, then lies down, then is finally directed to sit in the office chair is a good example of the principle that certain things cannot be accomplished narratively in the same way without directorial and editorial patience. Two full minutes are devoted to watching Ted fidget, unable to sit still, unable to resist making jokes, unable to commit. Sharon understands her patient, and she finally tells him, "Don't worry." But he still bolts as soon as she gets to the actual question of what happened when he had his panic attack. The next time they get together, he's more willing to be open, but it comes out as aggression, as he accuses her of not caring about patients and of misleading them over her rates.

It's good to have Ted push back against therapy, certainly. It borders on stalling out for the story to have him resist for so long and then give in and then go right back to resisting, but while that's not all that narratively satisfying, it's true to life, so it's hard to complain about it. Therapy as a straight line from broken to repaired is a pernicious myth, after all.

The impromptu meeting in the boot room is a great little sequence that pushes forward several stories at once. Ted counsels Keeley to consider just bottling up her feelings, since that reflects what's going on with him. Rebecca tells her to take action, because that's what she's thinking about. And Jamie just wants his name on his shirt in bigger letters, because that's what he's always thinking about. (The way Roy comes in and asks if they're all talking about him and they all say yes, with Jamie trailing and saying "Definitely"? Very good.)

Nate's story this season has been edging toward the genuinely sad, and this is the episode where you probably arrive at that point. Nick Mohammed is merciless in not cheating Nate's meanness with a wink or an air of uncertainty; he plays the arrogance as fully felt and absolutely genuine. To say that every bullied person who gains power then becomes a bully wouldn't be fair at all, but certainly one hazard of rising up through the ranks is having a little too much fun not being on the bottom of the ladder. Nate seems angry here, and as good as Beard's intentions were, there's an ugly story about power in the fact that sometimes when you tell a guy he can't mistreat powerful people, like players, all he does is move on to taking out his frustrations on less powerful people, like Will.

These are all really stories about what is and isn't strength, right? Ted feels like he's admitting something about himself that he's not ready to admit if he really opens up to therapy with Sharon, and he's accustomed to pushing through it. The first version of strength that he tries is to just push through with his usual jokes and small talk; it doesn't help. The second version he tries is combative derision; that doesn't help either. What takes the most strength for him is sitting down and admitting that he can't afford not to take the process seriously.

For Roy, he prides himself on being close to Keeley, on how attached they are. She's really pushed him at times to be open about his feelings, and he's done that, and now he feels like she's rejecting the same intimacy she asked for. It's hard for him — it takes guts — to step back from her and believe that it won't make them any less close just because they're ... less close.

And Nate has never really felt like he had power, either in his family or at work or probably anywhere else, and he has no idea what it's supposed to look like. It seems like there's some stuff going on with him that maybe hasn't entirely been explored, but at the very least, he's pointing his anger in the wrong direction. It's especially unsettling that he's so insistent that he didn't bungle the name "Wonder Kid," when he did. You never like to see a guy commit to something that's not true.

The New Yorker, Don Draper, The Jerky Boys, Citizen Kane, Dikembe Mutombo

When Roy finally figures out what Jamie is saying about space and how it applies to him, a lot of shows would have him quietly experience an epiphany. Roy, instead, screams an expletive. It's very funny.

It's not a particularly big Rebecca and Higgins week, except that Rebecca and Sam are still messaging each other and still don't know it. But when Roy comes in and Higgins covers by starting to scat, it's funny. When he's joined by Rebecca, it's funnier. And when they start up again after Roy and Keeley are gone, just apparently for the hell of it, it's funniest.

Billy Harris' Colin is often a source of comedy, but it's been interesting seeing him drawn into this story with Nate. Harris doesn't overcomplicate this kid we've been led to believe is a pretty simple and good-hearted dude, but his befuddlement at being disliked by Nate is nicely handled.

Just because Ted Lasso is a positive show doesn't mean its characters can't be dicks

The A.V. Club 03 September, 2021 - 02:00am

For instance, I feel confident now that Ted Lasso’s writers didn’t think Sam’s protest was as consequential as I did. At the time, I wrote a review that treated the loss of Dubai Air’s sponsorship like a seismic shift in the world of Ted Lasso, but two episodes later the team had jerseys with “bantr” on them instead, and the show has never circled back to Sam’s activism and the public’s reaction to it. As I’ve said previously, I consider that a missed opportunity, and an example of the show introducing something complicated and choosing to largely “resolve” it instead of embedding it into the show’s world. But as far as I knew, the show was simply biding its time to bring it up, and I suppose technically speaking it’s possible that there will be repercussions before the season is done (even if that seems unlikely at this stage). All I can do is capture my impression at this particular moment, aware that the show could make me look silly in multiple ways by the time the season ends. That’s the nature of writing in this format.

However, “Headspace” provides some assurance that the show intended me to have a problem with one of the show’s characters. From the beginning of the season, Nate’s behavior has felt off, and despite the fact that Ted and Coach Beard seemed to notice it too, no one was saying anything about it. The show just kept going on as though the way he was treating his replacement Will was acceptable, and that his demeaning comments about the players—his reaction to Dani’s yips stood out to me—weren’t a point of concern. In fact, the last few episodes have still ostensibly treated Nate’s journey as an aspirational one, with Rebecca and Keely teaching him to “make himself big” to get a table at a restaurant, which he used in order to take control of the FA Cup quarter-final in Ted’s absence and assert his skill as a coach. And while I didn’t make it the focus of either review, I found the show’s willingness to frame Nate’s actions as heroic disconcerting, and worried—in part because of the recent issue with Sam’s protest—that the show was sweeping the consequences of his behavior under the rug.

It’s hard to say exactly how Ted Lasso intends to address the fallout of Nate’s actions, but based on what we see here Ted himself will hold himself responsible for not stepping in sooner. When Nate makes his big apology, Ted asks Beard if he missed something, and the reality is that he did: he and Beard have shared looks on numerous occasions at things Nate has said and done, but neither of them stepped in. For all of the talk about belief and positivity, Ted didn’t want to make the necessary interventions, and failed to realize how the cumulative impact of Nate’s experience could spiral. And given that Nate’s escalation comes at the same time Ted is distracted with his own mental health struggles—which manifest here as a series of visits to Dr. Fieldstone where his desire for help, disdain for therapy, and refusal to quit converge—I can imagine that if/when Ted finds out about it he will think that he should have done more.

But will he realize this confirms that despite everyone acknowledging the broad good that Ted has done for AFC Richmond, the Ted Lasso philosophy is highly fallible? “Headspace” firmly positions Nate as Exhibit A for how the show’s feel-good attitude wasn’t just hiding Ted’s depression: it also allowed Nate’s inferiority complex to fester and turn into something far more toxic, and that should force everyone involved to reassess their choices. We know there’s a self-serving purpose behind Ted’s suggestion to Keeley that it might be good to “bottle things up,” even if everyone else doesn’t, but how much has his desire to avoid more emotionally complicated conflicts—whether in his marriage or among his coaching staff—created undesirable outcomes? As Ted combines “fight and flight” to avoid the answer to that question, and continues the lie about what happened at the game when asked by Trent Crimm (The Independent) directly, the show gets to dig deeper into the costs of hiding their issues behind the veneer of positivity that Ted’s philosophy has provided all of AFC Richmond.

But then again, he completely misread how to handle the situation when they first started connecting last season, so I suppose it’s just a reminder that more than being a show about inherently “good” characters, Ted Lasso works because it’s about inherently human characters, and the deeper we get into the second season the more the show is exploring the nuance of that quality. This might mean that a character like Nate starts to fall in our estimation, but that’s a natural extension of what we knew about the character thus far, and despite my initial reservations has evolved into a rich vein of storytelling for the back half of the season.

Why is Ted Lasso actor Brett Goldstein telling everyone he’s actually ‘a human man’?

The Guardian 03 September, 2021 - 01:08am

Steph, great question. There is a supposedly human man called Brett Goldstein who plays a grumpy footballer in the show Ted Lasso, on which he’s also a writer. Unfortunately his face is extremely matte and slightly too chiselled, and there is something deeply unsettling about the specific shadows cast by his football jersey – which has led many people on Reddit to believe that he is not, in fact, a real actor but instead a CGI animation of a grumpy footballer.

Roy Kent from “Ted Lasso” is a played by a real human actor who somehow is deep in the Uncanny Valley. pic.twitter.com/xjkfRR9e6o

no more ted lasso discourse it's time for "brett goldstein is cgi" discourse pic.twitter.com/DkSlFAlNp7

Where to even begin! Ted Lasso is a show about an American football coach – a very mustachioed Jason Sudeikis – who moves to the UK to lead up an ailing football team. Ted is relentlessly optimistic; his players, including captain Roy Kent (AKA the grumpy footballer played by Goldstein), are not.

my uncle works at ted lasso and he said roy kent is cgi

To paraphrase US supreme court justice Potter Stewart, I cannot define it, but I know it when I see it. And here is what people saw amid the quagmire of Reddit conspiracy threads: a glow around Roy Kent that reminded them of a video game character, the eeriness of his “slow eye movements, blinks, and odd body movements”, and uncanny valley callbacks to Grand Theft Auto and motion-capture Tintin.

If I were to extrapolate, I’d also say it’s reminding us of the dead-eyed Polar Express – the singular most terrifying Christmas movie – and glassy CGI influencers like Lil Miquela and Shudu. It’s all in the eyes!

It’s also worth noting that the latest release of Fifa – a blockbuster football video game – features players which appear remarkably lifelike. Just look at this (actual) CGI man, Kylian Mbappé, who plays for Paris St Germain in Fifa 21. You can practically see every sweaty pore.

Reddit is where conspiracy theories are born and born again – there are entire threads dedicated to defending the most outlandish pop cultural claims, my favourite of which is that Lea Michele cannot read.

Reddit users are convinced that famous cyclops Mike Wazowski actually had two eyes; that the ocean could actually be bottomless; and that Inspector Gadget and his foil, Dr. Claw, are the same person.

On a darker note, Reddit was also where QAnon was largely propagated before it was stamped out by moderators. Luckily, the Roy Kent CGI theory is safe – for now.

The first official word from Brett Goldstein was simply a robot emoji, posted to Twitter on Thursday. But he has since followed up with a “final statement on the matter”, explaining in very Roy Kentian language: “I am a completely real, normal, human man who just happens to live in a VFX house and does normal human basic things like rendering and buffering and transferring data.”

“I don’t know what everyone’s F-ing problem is.”

My final statement on the matter: pic.twitter.com/YPzNnOu4mg

Why is Ted Lasso actor Brett Goldstein telling everyone he’s actually ‘a human man’?

Lifehacker Australia 03 September, 2021 - 01:08am

Steph, great question. There is a supposedly human man called Brett Goldstein who plays a grumpy footballer in the show Ted Lasso, on which he’s also a writer. Unfortunately his face is extremely matte and slightly too chiselled, and there is something deeply unsettling about the specific shadows cast by his football jersey – which has led many people on Reddit to believe that he is not, in fact, a real actor but instead a CGI animation of a grumpy footballer.

Roy Kent from “Ted Lasso” is a played by a real human actor who somehow is deep in the Uncanny Valley. pic.twitter.com/xjkfRR9e6o

no more ted lasso discourse it's time for "brett goldstein is cgi" discourse pic.twitter.com/DkSlFAlNp7

Where to even begin! Ted Lasso is a show about an American football coach – a very mustachioed Jason Sudeikis – who moves to the UK to lead up an ailing football team. Ted is relentlessly optimistic; his players, including captain Roy Kent (AKA the grumpy footballer played by Goldstein), are not.

my uncle works at ted lasso and he said roy kent is cgi

To paraphrase US supreme court justice Potter Stewart, I cannot define it, but I know it when I see it. And here is what people saw amid the quagmire of Reddit conspiracy threads: a glow around Roy Kent that reminded them of a video game character, the eeriness of his “slow eye movements, blinks, and odd body movements”, and uncanny valley callbacks to Grand Theft Auto and motion-capture Tintin.

If I were to extrapolate, I’d also say it’s reminding us of the dead-eyed Polar Express – the singular most terrifying Christmas movie – and glassy CGI influencers like Lil Miquela and Shudu. It’s all in the eyes!

It’s also worth noting that the latest release of Fifa – a blockbuster football video game – features players which appear remarkably lifelike. Just look at this (actual) CGI man, Kylian Mbappé, who plays for Paris St Germain in Fifa 21. You can practically see every sweaty pore.

Reddit is where conspiracy theories are born and born again – there are entire threads dedicated to defending the most outlandish pop cultural claims, my favourite of which is that Lea Michele cannot read.

Reddit users are convinced that famous cyclops Mike Wazowski actually had two eyes; that the ocean could actually be bottomless; and that Inspector Gadget and his foil, Dr. Claw, are the same person.

On a darker note, Reddit was also where QAnon was largely propagated before it was stamped out by moderators. Luckily, the Roy Kent CGI theory is safe – for now.

The first official word from Brett Goldstein was simply a robot emoji, posted to Twitter on Thursday. But he has since followed up with a “final statement on the matter”, explaining in very Roy Kentian language: “I am a completely real, normal, human man who just happens to live in a VFX house and does normal human basic things like rendering and buffering and transferring data.”

“I don’t know what everyone’s F-ing problem is.”

My final statement on the matter: pic.twitter.com/YPzNnOu4mg

CM Punk drops a big hint on Bryan Danielson in AEW

The A.V. Club 02 September, 2021 - 11:45am

CM Punk was on WFAN New York this morning as part of his media tour to promote this Sunday’s AEW All Out pay-per-view.

Punk was asked if Bryan Danielson appearing in AEW is a forgone conclusion. Punk did not directly answer the question but what he said pretty much confirms that Danielson is on his way.

Punk said, “Listen, 7 years I was gone, if you told me who is the one guy that could get you back to wrestling, you can just have one match with him it would be him. I don’t know if that answer’s your question or not. But the guy was in the WrestleMania main event 6 months ago so that would be a huge acquisition. I think he could do everything he wants to do. For a guy like me and him, pro wrestling is art. This is our art.”

It is widely believed that Danielson will be making his debut this Sunday night at All Out on pay-per-view. The show can be purchased via FITE TV internationally and on the Bleacher Report app in the United States.

Danielson last wrestled at WrestleMania in a Triple Threat match with Edge and WWE Universal Champion Roman Reigns. His contract expired shortly thereafter.

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