Tesla Roadster to come in 2023 if company can avoid supply chain ‘mega drama’

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Teslarati 01 September, 2021 - 12:29pm 24 views

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said the electric automaker could ship the next-generation Roadster in 2023, as long as 2022 is not filled with “mega drama” in terms of supply chain shortages.

The Roadster was due to be delivered for the first time in 2020. The second generation of Tesla’s first-ever vehicle has been plagued by setbacks due to battery constraints and other challenges, including the ramping of Tesla’s mass-market Model 3 and Model Y. Simply put, Tesla has a lot of projects in the pipeline, and the Roadster is not necessarily the most important element of the company’s goal to accelerate the transition to sustainable energy.

Tesla and Musk have remained relatively quiet regarding Roadster production, with the CEO’s last updates coming in early 2021 during an appearance on the Joe Rogan Experience Podcast. Musk highlighted his want for the Roadster to equip the cold-gas SpaceX thrusters that could make the vehicle hover and have insanely-fast 1.1-second 0-60 acceleration rate and white-knuckle performance. Due to the challenges with production and supply chain restrictions, there hasn’t been a set timetable for Tesla to release the Roadster.

However, Musk tweeted on Wednesday that the Roadster could finally arrive in 2023, as long as 2022 doesn’t present massive bottlenecks in production. “Assuming 2022 is not mega drama, new Roadster should ship in 2023,” Musk said.

2021 has been the year of super crazy supply chain shortages, so it wouldn’t matter if we had 17 new products, as none would ship.

Assuming 2022 is not mega drama, new Roadster should ship in 2023.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) September 1, 2021

The supply chain shortages that have plagued much of the automotive industry have not affected Tesla as badly as other automakers. Tesla detailed its ability to develop 19 in-house microcontrollers that helped the company avert the massive shortage of semiconductor chips. This development has helped Tesla avoid lengthy production outages, keeping assembly lines rolling and increasing delivery and production figures through a tumultuous 2021.

The Roadster has been highly anticipated by many Tesla fans, especially those who earned the vehicle through the company’s Referral program. The vehicle is sure to turn heads with its lightning-fast 1.9-second 0-60 MPH acceleration rate. If Tesla can actually make the vehicle hover as it plans to, the company could be looking at one of the most revolutionary automotive inventions ever, although Musk has said that there will be a limitation on how long the vehicle will be able to “fly.” Regardless of its unconfirmed capabilities, the long-awaited Roadster could be here in less than two years if Musk’s calculations are correct.

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Elon Musk says Tesla Roadster delayed until 2023 as supply chain issues persist

CNBC 01 September, 2021 - 02:44pm

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said Wednesday that supply chain shortages continue to stress the automaker, and the company is delaying deliveries of the new version of the Roadster until 2023 at the earliest.

Specifically, he tweeted: "2021 has been the year of super crazy supply chain shortages, so it wouldn't matter if we had 17 new products, as none would ship. Assuming 2022 is not mega drama, new Roadster should ship in 2023."

Tesla is not alone among automakers grappling with supply chain pressure. Other automakers, including Toyota and Ford, have slashed production volumes to cope with chip shortages.

The new version of Tesla's high-performance electric car was supposed to debut in 2020. Tesla first revealed plans for the next-generation Roadster in late 2017 during an event to unveil a heavy-duty truck, the Tesla Semi, which the company also has yet to mass-produce.

At that time, the company said the next-generation Roadster would boast a top speed of at least 250 miles an hour, a 200 kilowatt-hour battery pack that would deliver more than 620 miles of range on a full charge and three electric motors enabling the Roadster to go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in under 2 seconds (and a quarter-mile in under 9 seconds).

Musk later promised the next-gen Roadster would be sold with a premium "SpaceX option" including rocket thrusters that would allow the car to hover far above the ground. He described it as a "full-on James Bond" vehicle in an episode of "Jay Leno's Garage."

According to Tesla's website, Roadster reservations require an initial $5,000 credit card payment with a $45,000 wire transfer payment due in 10 days. The reservation money is refundable up until the customer signs a purchase agreement. Tesla says it will send to these purchase agreements near the date of production.

Musk and other Tesla executives have discussed supply chain problems and parts shortages on earnings calls in recent quarters, emphasizing chip shortages.

On the second-quarter shareholder call, Musk said Tesla went through a "big struggle" to get enough modules that control the airbags and seatbelts in the company's cars. A lack of those modules limited the company's production in Fremont, California, and Shanghai.

Musk said May 31 that Tesla had raised the prices for some of its vehicles, and removed some parts from them, due to the rising cost of parts and raw materials amid recent supply chain pressures.

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Elon Musk says Tesla Roadster delayed until 2023 as supply chain issues persist

Automotive News 01 September, 2021 - 02:44pm

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said Wednesday that supply chain shortages continue to stress the automaker, and the company is delaying deliveries of the new version of the Roadster until 2023 at the earliest.

Specifically, he tweeted: "2021 has been the year of super crazy supply chain shortages, so it wouldn't matter if we had 17 new products, as none would ship. Assuming 2022 is not mega drama, new Roadster should ship in 2023."

Tesla is not alone among automakers grappling with supply chain pressure. Other automakers, including Toyota and Ford, have slashed production volumes to cope with chip shortages.

The new version of Tesla's high-performance electric car was supposed to debut in 2020. Tesla first revealed plans for the next-generation Roadster in late 2017 during an event to unveil a heavy-duty truck, the Tesla Semi, which the company also has yet to mass-produce.

At that time, the company said the next-generation Roadster would boast a top speed of at least 250 miles an hour, a 200 kilowatt-hour battery pack that would deliver more than 620 miles of range on a full charge and three electric motors enabling the Roadster to go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in under 2 seconds (and a quarter-mile in under 9 seconds).

Musk later promised the next-gen Roadster would be sold with a premium "SpaceX option" including rocket thrusters that would allow the car to hover far above the ground. He described it as a "full-on James Bond" vehicle in an episode of "Jay Leno's Garage."

According to Tesla's website, Roadster reservations require an initial $5,000 credit card payment with a $45,000 wire transfer payment due in 10 days. The reservation money is refundable up until the customer signs a purchase agreement. Tesla says it will send to these purchase agreements near the date of production.

Musk and other Tesla executives have discussed supply chain problems and parts shortages on earnings calls in recent quarters, emphasizing chip shortages.

On the second-quarter shareholder call, Musk said Tesla went through a "big struggle" to get enough modules that control the airbags and seatbelts in the company's cars. A lack of those modules limited the company's production in Fremont, California, and Shanghai.

Musk said May 31 that Tesla had raised the prices for some of its vehicles, and removed some parts from them, due to the rising cost of parts and raw materials amid recent supply chain pressures.

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Data is a real-time snapshot *Data is delayed at least 15 minutes. Global Business and Financial News, Stock Quotes, and Market Data and Analysis.

Tesla's Roadster delayed again, Musk says

CNET 01 September, 2021 - 01:18pm

The curious case of the new Tesla Roadster continues. On Wednesday, CEO Elon Musk replied to a Twitter user confirming what seemed inevitable: The Roadster is delayed. Again.

According to Musk's tweet, "2021 has been the year of super crazy supply chain shortages, so it wouldn't matter if we had 17 new products, as none would ship." This essentially gives us a formal statement in response to the earlier Cybertruck and Semi delays as well. But the enigmatic executive may already be signaling that we should take this new, later 2023 production timeframe for the Roadster with a big grain of salt. Musk added the Roadster "should ship in 2023" as long as 2022 isn't "mega drama."

So, if 2022 ends up being a headache of a year for Tesla on any front, it sounds like Musk has essentially left the door open to future delays. It's been four years since the Roadster made its surprise debut, and if the super electric sports car does come to market in 2023, it will mark a five-year window from prototype to production. That's not really an abnormally long gestation period for a new automobile, but it is definitely on the long side for a vehicle that's already been shown and promised for delivery much earlier. Furthermore, this all has to be particularly frustrating for those reservation holders who previously coughed up $50,000 deposits.

What remains unclear is if Tesla will still have a drivable prototype of the production car prepared this year. This past January, also speaking on Twitter, Musk said engineering for the new Roadster was done and aimed for a drivable beta car in late summer. Then again, late summer is here and now. Tesla doesn't operate a public relations department to field requests for comment.

At this point, it's not at all clear what will change on the Roadster en route to production. Perhaps Tesla will use the lengthy delays to ensure the production car meets the concept's outrageous performance claims, which includes a 0-60 mph time of under 2 seconds and 620 miles of range. I just hope those with $50,000 deposits have a lot of patience.

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