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MLB 15 July, 2021 - 12:16pm 23 views

When is the MLB All Star Game 2021 Time?

The finale of 2021 All-Star weekend, the 2021 MLB All-Star Game, is scheduled to get underway at 7:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday, July 13. Expect first pitch to take place just after 8:00 p.m. ET as the pre-game ceremonies and All-Star announcements will take up a decent amount of time beforehand. Sporting NewsWhat time does MLB All-Star Game start? TV schedule, channel to watch 2021 AL vs. NL game

Who won the all star game 2021 score?

The American League extended its MLB All-Star Game winning streak to eight, getting home runs from Vladimir Guerrero Jr. and Mike Zunino with starting pitcher Shohei Ohtani picking up the win in a 5-2 victory over the National League on Tuesday at Coors Field. USA TODAY2021 MLB All-Star Game as it happened: Shohei Ohtani gets the win for American League

Who was the All Star Game MVP 2021?

Update — Vladimir Guerrero Jr. is your 2021 All-Star Game MVP! The AL took the game 5-2 over the NL thanks to Vlad Jr., who accounted for 2 of the 5 runs, including a mammoth 468-foot HR in the third inning. DraftKings Nation2021 MLB All-Star Game MVP winner: Vladimir Guerrero Jr. wins award after belting mammoth HR in AL win

Who won MLB All Star MVP?

Toronto Blue Jays' Vladimir Guerrero Jr. hit a 468-foot home run in the third inning, helping push the American League to a 5-2 win over the National League on Tuesday night in the 2021 MLB All-Star Game. The AthleticMLB All-Star Game: Vladimir Guerrero Jr. wins MVP; AL beats NL

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MLB All-Star Game uniforms draw pointed comments on social media

USA TODAY 15 July, 2021 - 03:05pm

New design with multiple team logos a drastic departure from traditional home white, road gray uniforms from players' MLB teams.

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While there are many contentious debates currently taking place in baseball there is one thing that everyone can agree on: The new All Star jerseys are terrible. USA TODAY

Baseball is a game steeped in tradition, so any breaks with what fans have come to expect is frequently met with resistance.

At Major League Baseball's 91st All-Star Game at Coors Field in Denver, the traditional look of home team players in their individual teams' white uniforms and members of the visiting team in their road grays was turned upside down.

MLB introduced a new design this year that incorporated MLB teams' logos and a three-letter abbreviation of their home city superimposed on top of each other down the left side of the uniform. 

LIVE TRACKER:2021 All-Star Game updates

So how would one describe the look? How about "Manthreads"? 

These grotesque All-Star uniform shall henceforth be known as “Manthreads”

Other fans on social media made a point of contrasting the new uniforms with the traditional look.

This is so much more fun with real uniforms. pic.twitter.com/xU1UH7Bm9f

Zero to do about the “look” of the All Star uniforms BUT NO ONE can tell me it looks better than having all the teams unis on the line! @mlb please make this a 1 year deal, each uniform speaks to a fan base!

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A uniform opinion: All-Star duds don't draw All-Star reviews

Japan Today 15 July, 2021 - 03:05pm

American League players celebrate after the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. The American League defeated the National League 5-2.

National League's Fernando Tatis Jr., of the San Diego Padres, reacts after flying out during the third inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

National League players and coaches watch during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. The American League defeated the National League 5-2.

American League's Liam Hendriks, of the Chicago White Sox, right, takes a hit of oxygen on the mound during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

American League's Jared Walsh, of the Los Angeles Angels, throws during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

National League's Alex Reyes, of the St. Louis Cardinals, throws during the eighth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

American League's Shohei Ohtani, of the Los Angeles Angeles, runs out his ground out during the first inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

DENVER (AP) — Fernando Tatis Jr., Aaron Judge, Nolan Arenado and the rest of the All-Stars certainly got needled over their new threads.

As the American League was rolling toward a 5-2 win in their all-blue ensemble Tuesday night at Coors Field, fans on social media were having a field day, taking swings at uniforms that certainly weren't in vogue.

They weren't the only ones, either.

“We can do better. We can do better, man,” White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson said. “We need the players’ input next time.”

The AL sported outfits that reminded some of jumpsuits or pajamas. The NL version wasn't much better — an all-white production that had many commenting they looked, well, bland.

No classic birds-on-a-bat design for the St. Louis Cardinals, no sweet script for the Dodgers. No brown pinstripes on the shirts for the Padres, no recognizable “NY” logo displayed prominently on the hat for the Yankees.

“MLB should just let the players wear their own uniforms instead of these slow pitch softball ones," Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Brett Anderson posted on Twitter.

Tatis, one of the flashiest players in the majors, tried to make his own improvements. The Padres shortstop accessorized with pink shoes and matching sleeve on his arm.

All-Star Game MVP Vladimir Guerrero Jr. was able to stand out, too — for his bat, not his attire, thanks to a 468-foot homer into the thin Rocky Mountain air.

All eyes were on Shohei Ohtani, dull uniform or not. He was the main attraction as he became the first All-Star to be picked as a pitcher and a position player.

What the All-Stars were wearing, however, didn't exactly draw All-Star reviews.

This bordered more on fashion faux pas than trendy. In fact, the only thing trending was all the criticism.

Rather than familiar logos and names, there were three-letter abbreviations on the jerseys for what team they represented.

Bring back the rainbow of colors, many said, and let players wear their own club's uniforms. That was a big part of the game’s charm, they maintained.

Or next time, maybe even ask for fashion tips from the players.

“I’m a big fan of each team wearing their own,” White Sox closer Liam Hendriks said after earning the save as the AL won its eighth straight All-Star Game. “Don’t get me wrong, I love the uniformity, I don’t mind the little stars on the back, but for me, this year specifically, it would have been nice."

Major League Baseball has a billion-dollar contract with Nike, whose swoosh was displayed prominently on the right side of the uniform just below the collar.

“I don’t like blue pants. I think it’s interesting," Hendriks said. "I don’t mind the concept they’re going for, I just feel like they need a little more player input. This year was thrown together so quickly, so hopefully years in the future we can get a little collaboration going.”

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Chicago Cubs president of baseball operations Jed Hoyer decided to wave the white towel this week after watching his team lose its 11th consec…

American League players celebrate after the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. The American League defeated the National League 5-2.

National League's Fernando Tatis Jr., of the San Diego Padres, reacts after flying out during the third inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

National League players and coaches watch during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. The American League defeated the National League 5-2.

American League's Liam Hendriks, of the Chicago White Sox, right, takes a hit of oxygen on the mound during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

American League's Jared Walsh, of the Los Angeles Angels, throws during the ninth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

National League's Alex Reyes, of the St. Louis Cardinals, throws during the eighth inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

American League's Shohei Ohtani, of the Los Angeles Angeles, runs out his ground out during the first inning of the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver.

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MLB All-Star Game bombs in ratings again. Here's why | TheHill

The Hill 15 July, 2021 - 03:05pm

But for Tuesday night's game, the Nielsen numbers were profoundly horrible: 8.24 million people tuned in, making it the second-least-watched All-Star Game in history. This number is stunning when considering what was billed as one of the most compelling lineups in years, one that included Los Angeles Angels' Japanese sensation Shohei Ohtani, who was the first player in All-Star Game history to be a starting pitcher and bat lead-off,  and the game's first two-way starter dating back to 1933.  

In other words, for the Ohtani factor alone, the numbers should have landed at least above the 10 million-viewer threshold, but didn't. And if you’re looking for a big reason outside of cord-cutting, look no further than the backlash baseball is receiving for moving the All-Star Game out of Georgia to Colorado due to the former's new voting laws. 

Of course, Colorado's law governing early voting actually has a smaller time window than Georgia’s, showing that Major League Baseball didn't do its homework before abruptly pulling the game out of Atlanta. Perhaps MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred read some of the headlines portraying the new law as racist.

NBA players are now boycotting their own games. The NBA audience had already collapsed and now it will tank even more. This is get woke, go broke for all the world to see. Amazing. https://t.co/O10E3WC79l

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MLB All-Star Game uniforms not drawing All-Star reviews

FOX31 Denver 15 July, 2021 - 03:05pm

DENVER (AP) — Fernando Tatis Jr., Aaron Judge, Nolan Arenado and the rest of the All-Stars certainly got needled over their new threads.

As the American League was rolling toward a 5-2 win in their all-blue ensemble Tuesday night at Coors Field, fans on social media were having a field day, taking swings at uniforms that certainly weren’t in vogue.

They weren’t the only ones, either.

“We can do better. We can do better, man,” White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson said. “We need the players’ input next time.”

The AL sported outfits that reminded some of jumpsuits or pajamas. The NL version wasn’t much better — an all-white production that had many commenting they looked, well, bland.

No classic birds-on-a-bat design for the St. Louis Cardinals, no sweet script for the Dodgers. No brown pinstripes on the shirts for the Padres, no recognizable “NY” logo displayed prominently on the hat for the Yankees.

“MLB should just let the players wear their own uniforms instead of these slow pitch softball ones,” Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Brett Anderson posted on Twitter.

Tatis, one of the flashiest players in the majors, tried to make his own improvements. The Padres shortstop accessorized with pink shoes and matching sleeve on his arm.

All-Star Game MVP Vladimir Guerrero Jr. was able to stand out, too — for his bat, not his attire, thanks to a 468-foot homer into the thin Rocky Mountain air.

All eyes were on Shohei Ohtani, dull uniform or not. He was the main attraction as he became the first All-Star to be picked as a pitcher and a position player.

What the All-Stars were wearing, however, didn’t exactly draw All-Star reviews.

This bordered more on fashion faux pas than trendy. In fact, the only thing trending was all the criticism.

Rather than familiar logos and names, there were three-letter abbreviations on the jerseys for what team they represented.

Bring back the rainbow of colors, many said, and let players wear their own club’s uniforms. That was a big part of the game’s charm, they maintained.

Or next time, maybe even ask for fashion tips from the players.

“I’m a big fan of each team wearing their own,” White Sox closer Liam Hendriks said after earning the save as the AL won its eighth straight All-Star Game. “Don’t get me wrong, I love the uniformity, I don’t mind the little stars on the back, but for me, this year specifically, it would have been nice.”

Major League Baseball has a billion-dollar contract with Nike, whose swoosh was displayed prominently on the right side of the uniform just below the collar.

“I don’t like blue pants. I think it’s interesting,” Hendriks said. “I don’t mind the concept they’re going for, I just feel like they need a little more player input. This year was thrown together so quickly, so hopefully years in the future we can get a little collaboration going.”

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trademark and Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

DENVER (KDVR) — A brazen bike thief in Denver's Art District on Santa Fe was caught on camera trying to pin a Good Samaritan with an SUV.

It happened back on July 1. The two men victimized in the case say the reached out to the Problem Solvers after becoming discouraged with the Denver Police investigation into their cases. It all began when Sean Dubois says a woman got into his garage and pedaled away on his $5,000 mountain bike.

Residents in Denver’s North Park Hill neighborhood can finally breathe some relief after a trash mess was removed near East 35th Avenue and Leyden Street.

Alexander Damian Martinez, 28, is described as a Hispanic male, standing 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighing 200 pounds. He is bald with a goatee and has the initials “LS” tattooed on the top of his head.

Guerrero steals spotlight in AL’s All-Star game win

Paris Post Intelligencer 15 July, 2021 - 03:05pm

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American League's Vladimir Guerrero Jr., of the Toronto Blue Jays, kisses the MVP trophy after the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)

American League's Vladimir Guerrero Jr., of the Toronto Blue Jays, kisses the MVP trophy after the MLB All-Star baseball game, Tuesday, July 13, 2021, in Denver. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)

DENVER (AP) — A Sho-case for Shohei Ohtani became a grand stage for Vladimir Guerrero Jr., too. Ohtani unleashed his 100 mph heat while pitching a perfect inning for the win in becoming baseball’s first two-way All-Star, Guerrero rocked Coors Field with a 468-foot home run and the American League breezed 5-2 Tuesday night for its eighth straight victory. Near and far, the sport’s entire focus was on Ohtani from the very start in this All-Star Game. Players on both sides climbed to the dugout rails to watch him, and the Japanese sensation went 0 for 2, grounding out twice as the AL’s leadoff man and designated hitter. Jared Walsh, Ohtani’s teammate on the Los Angeles Angels, got a save -- with his glove. He made a sliding catch in left field on Kris Bryant’s tricky liner with the bases loaded to end the eighth inning. So even with the teams decked out in new uniforms that social media deemed a strikeout instead of a home run, it was a familiar result. Mike Zunino also connected for the AL as it improved to 46-43-2 overall in the series. Guerrero, at 22, became the youngest MVP in All-Star Game history. J.T. Realmuto homered for the National League on a milehigh night at Coors, baseball’s ultimate launching pad. A 27-year-old right-hander in his fourth big league season, Ohtani has dazzled. He leads the major leagues with 33 homers and is 4-1 in 13 starts as a pitcher, a two-way performance not seen since Babe Ruth in 1919 and ‘20.

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Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Shohei Ohtani and MLB's Youth Movement Give Baseball Some Juice Despite Political Cloud Surrounding All-Star Game - Sportscasting | Pure Sports

Sportscasting 15 July, 2021 - 12:12pm

Vladdy and Ohtani highlighted an exciting week in Denver. The two players are also emblematic of how MLB’s young batch of charismatic superstars captures new audiences and reenergizes baseball fans around the country, regardless of political grievances.

The Braves statement regarding the moving of the MLB All-Star Game: pic.twitter.com/0Iapm3eIre

All-Star weekend was not supposed to be in Denver.

The festivities were supposed to take place at Truist Park in Atlanta, home of the Braves. However, MLB decided to move All-Star weekend out of Atlanta after the state of Georgia passed a controversial voting bill.

The bill was scrutinized on a national level, including by Nick Corasiniti and Reid J. Epstein of the New York Times, for limiting absentee ballots and creating a number of voting restrictions. Commissioner Rob Manfred previously said that MLB spoke with players regarding the best course of action before deciding on a new location for All-Star weekend.

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box,” Manfred said in a statement, via Alden Gonzalez of ESPN. “In 2020, MLB became the first professional sports league to join the non-partisan Civic Alliance to help build a future in which everyone participates in shaping the United States. We proudly used our platform to encourage baseball fans and communities throughout our country to perform their civic duty and actively participate in the voting process. Fair access to voting continues to have our game’s unwavering support.”

The decision garnered plenty of praise but also plenty of backlash. The Atlanta Braves organization issued a statement expressing its disappointment and suggesting businesses and fans were “victims.”

Major League Baseball would ultimately opt for Coors Field as the new home for All-Star festivities.

A lot of the political chatter surrounding the All-Star Game appeared to die down in the past couple of months, but the Republican National Committee attempted to reinvigorate the discussion.

The RNC ran an advertisement featuring former Georgia state House of Representatives member Reverend Melvin Emerson. The ad blamed the Democratic Party for using the All-Star Game as a means of pushing their “divisive political agenda.”

It might have been reasonable to wonder whether some Americans would boycott All-Star weekend in alignment with some of the statements made in the ad. However, the numbers tell a different story.

Bill Shea of The Athletic reported Fox Sports saw an average of 8.24 million domestic viewers on Tuesday, up from 8.14 million in 2019. That number jumps to 8.31 million U.S. viewers when accounting for Spanish-language Fox Deportes. There was also a sizable rise in streaming. In fact, Fox reported it was the most-streamed contest in All-Star history.

Shea also noted the Home Run Derby, won by New York Mets slugger Pete Alonso, had its highest viewership since 2017.

Needless to say, there was still plenty of interest in all the star power on display in Denver. The talent appeared to — for the most part — supersede political protest or reservations.

Why were there so many eyeballs on All-Star weekend? The captivating talents of guys like Guerrero and Ohtani seemingly have a lot to do with increased viewership.

Guerrero has been arguably the best hitter in baseball. The Toronto Blue Jays slugger leads the majors in batting average (.332), on-base percentage (.430), RBI (73), and OPS (1.089). He has a legitimate chance at the Triple Crown and flashed his immense power Tuesday en route to being named All-Star MVP.

Every Vladimir Guerrero Jr. homer is absolutely majestic.pic.twitter.com/De9qbYkoDw

Ohtani does it both at the plate and on the mound. He leads the majors in homers (33) and slugging percentage (.698) while also amassing a 3.49 ERA in 13 starts, with 87 strikeouts in 67 innings. The Japanese star participated in the Home Run Derby, started as the American League’s designated hitter, and was also the AL’s starting pitcher. What he is doing truly is unprecedented.

Guerrero and Ohtani are but a couple of MLB’s incredible wave of fresh talent. San Diego Padres shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. is another headliner, as is Washington Nationals outfielder Juan Soto.

There are still discussions to be had on how best to grow the sport. But, if Manfred and Co. do their job correctly, the excitement provided by these stars should transcend political theater.

Thoughts and Observations from the 91st MLB All-Star Game

Pinstripe Alley 15 July, 2021 - 09:00am

Seeing Aaron Judge caps off two amazing days at Coors Field.

Monday night: The Home Run Derby was an absolute spectacle. If the stadium had had a roof, the introduction of Shohei Ohtani would have blown it off. Fans were stoked to see the Angels’ phenom… they had to wait, though, as Ohtani vs. Juan Soto closed out the opening round.

Before that, the crowd quickly coalesced behind Trey Mancini of the Orioles, who recently overcame a bout with cancer. After Mancini knocked out Matt Olson (I was sitting with a friend and Astros fan who booed the latter mercilessly) and hometown hero Trevor Story eliminated perhaps-future-Yankee Joey Gallo, the Denver crowd was guaranteed a feel-good story would at least advance to the final round.

It was obvious from the start, though, that Pete Alonso was dialed in. Seriously. He hit 25 home runs prior to his one minute of bonus time in the first round. Almost everyone else prior to him took up valuable seconds of their bonus time to get their swing back. But Alonso was dancing and looked like he was absolutely on fire before going into his final minute. I turned to my Astros fan friend and called the bonus total. Ten homeruns from Alonzo in sixty seconds. He did not make a liar out of me. If only he wasn’t a Met.

But everyone was waiting for Ohtani and Soto… and they did not disappoint. Titanic bomb after titanic bomb had the live crowd in awe. I was sitting 20 rows back from field level behind the first base line, and watching their moonshots soar towards and into the upper deck in right field is one of the most surreal things I have ever seen. Shouts in unison of “oh my GOD!” were pretty common as those two dueled. The crowd was deflated when Ohtani bowed out in the three-swing second tiebreaker, but he and Soto put on an absolute clinic.

It was pretty apparent early that this was Alonso’s night, much to the delight of the Mets fan directly behind me who yelled “Let’s go, Pete!” at least fifty times Monday. No one was beating the Polar Bear. It was a moral victory that Mancini at least made Alonso use bonus time in the final round. One day I want to see Alonso face off with Aaron Judge and watch those two right-handed behemoths send moonshots into orbit while the live crowd looks on in shock.

3) Former Rockie and crowd favorite Nolan Arenado coming out to psyche up Trevor Story during the latter’s timeout while hitting. Denver still loves Arenado, as well they should.

2) Ohtani vs. Soto… all of it. Ohtani’s exit velocities were amazing. As an aside, I’d love to see him and Stanton pair off and see who can hit a baseball faster than the speed of sound.

1) The foregone conclusion that was Pete Alonso’s victory in the final round. I would have been more surprised if the sun hadn’t risen Tuesday morning than I would have been had Alonso not won the Derby.

Tuesday night: The All-Star Game itself. These tickets were not quite as good, but we still had a great view of the game from the second-highest row in the right field corner in foul territory. Coming into Coors Field before the start, it was thrilling to see the Yankees well-represented among the fans who came to the game. There were easily more people in Yankees gear than any team other than the Rockies, at least from what I saw.

The tribute to Hank Aaron at the beginning of the game, which was originally supposed to happen in Atlanta, was a bit tear-inducing. I was definitely choked up by the time it ended, as the montage reinforced the all-time legend’s importance not just to baseball, but to modern America. Seeing Aaron Judge escort Billye Aaron out with Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman was another poignant moment for me.

It really struck me during player introductions that this game was going to knock a whole bunch of players off my baseball bucket list. Aaron Judge and Gerrit Cole (though I still can’t say I saw the latter actually play, and well he should not have after his Saturday night masterpiece), Max Scherzer, Vlad Guerrero, Jr., Shohei Ohtani, Juan Soto, and on and on.

Shortly after I posted some pictures to social media, messages “requesting” All-Star swag came in from friends back in Canada. Being a relatively nice guy, I decided to accommodate them and ran for some baseballs prior to Aaron Judge’s second at-bat (I was determined not to miss anything he did). Good news… I made it back to my seats for that. Bad (and enraging) news… I missed Vladdy’s monstrous 468-foot dinger.

Every Vladimir Guerrero Jr. homer is absolutely majestic.pic.twitter.com/De9qbYkoDw

I was mildly irked when I heard the gasp and then roar of the Coors crowd, knowing that Guerrero had just parked one and that I missed it. Vlad got my vote for MVP, and while I worried I had voted too soon when Kris Bryant had the chance to hit an ASG grand slam, ultimately I chose correctly.

3) Basking in the crowd booing Aaron Judge and Gerrit Cole. “They don’t boo nobodies,” as Reggie Jackson once said.

2) Aaron Judge’s walk and subsequent run scored to put the AL on the board, and then his nice catch in right field later in the game.

1) The Hank Aaron tribute. I am a baseball nut and a graduate student in history. Baseball history is my jam.

I knew the All-Star Game was a possibility, but I never actually expected it to come together. I consider myself profoundly lucky to have been able to attend while I am living in the United States. With Canada only having one team right now, the odds of the ASG coming to my homeland on a regular basis are pretty slim.

Having seen baseball’s brightest stars gathered together in an amazing stadium, it is time to turn my attention to the second half. Hopefully, All-Stars Judge and Cole can help lead the charge that ends with the Yankees celebrating another championship this fall.

The Purple Row staff shares their favorite moments from All-Star Weekend

Purple Row 15 July, 2021 - 09:00am

Some of us were there, others stayed home, but we all had a great time!

I was nine years old the last time the All-Star Game came to Denver. My family spent a day at the Play Ball Park (or whatever it was called in 1998), my dad took my sister to the Home Run Derby, and he took me to the actual All-Star Game. The truth is that I don’t remember much outside the pregame intros, Robbie Alomar’s home run, and looking at all the big names on the scoreboard. Seriously, go check the Baseball-Reference box score: 11 of the 18 starters are in the Hall of Fame, not including Barry Bonds, Mark McGuire (the year he broke the home run record), or Alex Rodriguez.

This year’s game boasted one of the youngest average age of any All-Star Game in history. That youth bears exciting potential for the game but also means that we may have just seen a dozen or more future Hall of Famers. And that thought gives me giddy chills.

One thing I most enjoyed was seeing how many fans of different teams were at Coors Field this week. Not only were there the standard Dodgers, Red Sox, and Cubs fans, but Nationals, Royals, Pirates, and even Marlins fans. Sure, most of those people probably moved to Denver in the last three years (I kid... mostly). But the diversity of jerseys was legitimately exciting and made those random conversations with fans in the stands interesting, from talking prospects at the Futures Game to learning who Quavo and J.I.I.D. are at the Celebrity Softball Game.

Oh, and the dingers. Watching Pete Alonso, Juan Soto, and Shohei Ohtani go ham at the Derby was definitely a top five live sporting experience of my life. Maybe we can convince MLB to let Coors host the (or at least a) Home Run Derby every year!

I’ll (hopefully) be an old man by the time the next All Star Game comes to Denver. And I just hope I get to spend it with my boys and their kids, and reminisce about which new generation of Hall of Famers I’ll be witnessing.

Coming out of the three days I spent at and around Coors Field for the All-Star Weekend, my legs ache, I’m sunburned despite copious application of sunscreen, my voice is shot, and I think I sweat more than I have in my entire life. I wouldn’t trade any of it for the world. Getting to spend All-Star weekend at my home ballpark and make amazing memories with dear friends was one of the greatest experiences of my life. Every day was an absolute blast. My only regret is not getting to meet Larry Walker, but I did take a photo with a life-sized standee of him. That’s almost as good for now.

On Sunday I got to cheer my prospects in the Futures Game and was treated with a Michael Toglia home run, only to follow that up with a Vinny Castilla home run in the absolutely delightful Celebrity Softball Game. On Monday I spent all day at the fantastic Play Ball Park, soaking in some very cool exhibits, embarrassing myself at the pitching cages, and redeeming that embarrassment by BREAKING A BALL in the batting cages (they let me keep it). I also got to meet Preston Wilson and Chris Iannetta — whom I idolized as a kid — and Hall of Famer Rollie Fingers. Screaming myself hoarse for Trevor Story in the Home Run Derby capped off the day and watching players hit towering moonshots was incredible. I treated myself to sleeping in on Tuesday before meeting Ryan Spilborghs on the 16th Street Mall was the best way to start the afternoon before heading to the stadium — but not before a trip to Biker Jims. I got to cap off my weekend with an incredibly entertaining All-Star Game in a packed Coors Field with standing ovations for Germán Márquez and Nolan Arenado as they made Colorado proud yet again... Even if Nolan is no longer on the Rockies.

I would also like to thank my amazing colleagues at Purple Row. Getting to meet those of you I could and talk shop in person was delightful and I love working with all of you. Joining up this year has been a dream come true, and I couldn’t do any of this without you. Here’s to you guys!

My favorite moment was spending the day with my mom — who loves baseball and has passed that love on to me — and my wife — a new baseball fan who is embracing the Rockies despite how hard they make it — at PlayBall Park. It was overwhelming to walk into a baseball paradise and feel like a kid again. We attended panels, being inspired by professional women baseball players and women coaches and gaining insight into Aaron Cook’s thoughts on his All-Star performance and 2008 and his views on the sticky stuff debate. But the best part was the exhibits dedicated to honoring the Negro Leagues, Black history in baseball, the Latino legacy, and the memorabilia in the National Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum, especially from the women who played in World War II to owners that helped save their teams. It puts things in perspective to see all the history and all the amazing trailblazers who loved and played this game, despite barriers, to help make the game what it is today.

I never even fathomed attending the All-Star Game as a fan unless it came to Denver. I now want to go to every single one.

My family and I soaked up the Home Run Derby from the Rooftop, and the most memorable blast of the night came during warmups before the Derby even began. Shohei Ohtani hit the top of the Rooftop: above the seats, above the first standing deck, and off the facing of the second standing deck. (I was about 50 feet away and can still hardly believe it.) Our “Rooftop General Admission” strips put us not in the top deck for the game itself, but in the open area above the bullpens for all nine innings. Ohtani and Max Scherzer warmed up simultaneously, followed by more of the finest arms on the planet.

Lance Lynn showed off one of the smoothest pitching motions out there. Nathan Eovaldi was bringing the heat for a ton of pitches. Chris Bassitt displayed one of my favorite deliveries. Trevor Rogers displayed why he’s a Rookie of the Year leader. Liam Hendriks was getting all sorts of fired up. Mark Melancon was bringing it for his hometown crowd. Germán Márquez was one of those premier arms: that bullpen gate opened for him and it was something special.

I was fortunate enough to attend both the Futures Game and Home Run Derby this past weekend and both were exhilarating in their own way. The derby was like a fireworks show, with bombs being launched in the air in such rapid succession that my attention was rarely drawn to home plate, but rather the outfield fence where I could watch one ball land and then pick up the next mid-flight. It was a surreal experience and is something I am extremely happy I was able to witness. For as much fun as I had on Monday, Sunday may have made me even happier. As a baseball nerd who closely follows players who will be future major leaguers, it was an incredible opportunity to see so many on the field at the same time. The luxury of watching such talented ballplayers on display before they reach the game’s highest stage was as remarkable as I had hoped it would be. Experiencing the two events in-person while watching the broadcast of the actual game allowed me to soak in the entire weekend from all angles and created one of the best experiences I’ve had in watching baseball at 20th and Blake for the past 26 years.

This was my first time experiencing All-Star festivities in person, and it was amazing! The atmosphere at Coors Field was an absolute party, and seeing so many fans from all over the country (and in some cases, the world) was really cool. The Home Run Derby was a bombastic event from start to finish, and is unlike anything I’ve seen before. The epic duel between Shohei Ohtani and Juan Soto in the opening round gripped me, and seeing Trevor Story blast a 518-foot moonshot was indescribable. My second night was spent at the All-Star Game, and I’d be lying if I said the tribute video for Hank Aaron didn’t choke me up pretty good. The game itself was fun - how about that clean inning from our own Germán Márquez! - but my absolute highlight of the evenings was meeting and messing around with other fans. I guessed home run distances with Padres fans, talked strategy with Cardinals fans, discussed trades with Mariners fans, and more. Hanging out with so many fun, diverse people, brought together by our common interest in the sport that we all love, was indescribable. How can you not be romantic about baseball?

Everything about the All-Star Game was larger than life, from the PBR-styled Home Run Derby to the more traditional All-Star Game (albeit with terrible uniforms) to all the baseball activities and resources available to fans. However, I want to focus on something very small that’s stayed with me.

With 1:24 remaining in Trevor Story’s first round of the Home Run Derby, he took his 40-second break. When he did, Nolan Arenado met him with some Gatorade and encouragement. At that moment, an already-enthusiastic crowd fired up.

Club confirms it was high quality H2O pic.twitter.com/mvtXFnrXXE

As Arenado later explained, “(Trevor) asked me to be his water boy, and I said, ‘No problem, I got you. . . . I was just trying to get the fans hype for ‘Sto’ because he deserved it. He put on a great show.”

Story hit 20 homers in the first round, one for 518 feet, which was enough to get him to the second round, but he got no further. For me, though, the highlight was that timeout when for 40 seconds, the best left side in baseball was back together, and fans got to thank Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story for years of truly great baseball.

Unlike many on our staff, I took in the All-Star Game festivities from the comfort of my home. Sure, I wish I could have experienced the thrill of being in a packed stadium but sitting on my couch didn’t diminish my enjoyment of the events. I watched MLB Network religiously and it was so fun to watch the parade of players coming onto the shows and just talking about their passion and excitement for the game. I don’t usually watch the All-Star Game itself, but I wanted to watch Germán Márquez pitch and I was not disappointed when he came in to pitch the fourth inning. I’ll admit I even got a little emotional after he departed because I was so proud to see a pitcher for the Rockies dominate at Coors Field for the whole world to see. The Home Run Derby was also a highlight as I watched it with my parents on television. It was everything I had hoped it would be despite my bracket predictions immediately being disproven, and even though Trevor Story wasn’t able to win it, my family and I had a blast sitting together and enjoying the atmosphere of the game we love.

One of the joys of parenthood is being able to see things through a child’s eyes again. I was able to take my nine year-old son to Play Ball Park on Monday and see how wide-eyed he was as he saw some Hall-of-Famers and former Rockies. He robbed a home run, had his third-to-home running speed timed, clocked his fastball and bat speed, and got to learn quite a bit about the history of the game. He also got to see his dad get heckled by LaTroy Hawkins for attempting to pitch while wearing flip-flops (70 MPH for what it’s worth). The biggest opportunity of the day was when we got to meet one of my dad’s favorite players and Denver Bears great, Tim Raines. My dad passed on a love of baseball that I am getting to pass down to my son and getting to send a picture to him of his son, his grandson, and the baseball player he most enjoyed watching felt like a perfect full-circle moment to end the event.

This was my first ever All-Star Game. I moved to Denver in 2000 and moved to Arizona in September 2011, so I just barely missed the ASG each time. But I had the unique experience of being credentialed to cover the events, and boy was it exhilarating! Exhausting, but exhilarating.

For me, it was fun to see it a bit from both sides. My partner, who is not a baseball guy, and I attended the Play Ball Park on Saturday night. We went in late, so we only had two hours to do the whole thing, which ended up being enough. I enjoyed being able to walk around and see all of the exhibits and activities, and even my partner enjoyed learning about Hall-of-Famers and the Negro Leagues. It was a ton of fun!

The rest of the week was absolutely non-stop, from an early 9:00am call on Sunday for pregame ahead of the Futures Game until about midnight on Tuesday. I was able to connect with players — some new ones and others who I’ve talked to before — and media alike, and we were also able to meet up as a Purple Row staff during the Celebrity Softball Game and before the Home Run Derby. It was so great to meet everyone!

While I was in the auxiliary press box (Section 207, Row 16 for me) and didn’t have the best view of the field, it was still incredible to experience the energy that the crowd brought to the game. I’m not gonna lie, I was surprised at the number of people who attended the Futures Game (49,012), but in a good way! Then there were two full houses for the Derby and All-Star Game itself and the energy was through the Rooftop! It was also cool to see the energy around the stadium and how well everything came together.

My absolute favorite moment, though, was the on-field BP before the Home Run Derby. I think that was the first moment when it really hit me that I was on the field covering the All-Star Game! It was really hard to not completely fangirl over everything, but I kept my composure.

Despite everything, the Rockies did a fantastic job and I cannot stress that enough. They had a short turnaround, a lot of rookie staff members, and just general challenges that come with hosting and All-Star Game and they nailed it. Sure, there was some chaos, but at the end of the day, I couldn’t have asked for a better first All-Star Game experience!

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