The Walking Dead: Lauren Cohan says Negan mentioning Glenn is disgusting | EW.com

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Entertainment Weekly News 24 August, 2021 - 10:30am 7 views

When does Season 11 of The Walking Dead start?

Season 11 premieres August 22. google.comWatch! The Walking Dead Season 11 Episode 1 Online Online Full Episode

Is this the last season of Walking Dead?

Season 11 will be the last for the show. The first 12 episodes will air this year and another 12 will air next year. A spinoff is planned in 2023 that will feature characters Daryl (Norman Reedus) and Carol (Melissa McBride). pennlive.comHow to watch the premiere of ‘The Walking Dead’ final season tonight (8/22/21): free live stream, time, chann

Is there a season 11 of The Walking Dead?

The Walking Dead had its official premiere last night, after its AMC+ showing a week ago. Season 11 will be the final season of the main show before it finishes the comic source material and splinters into spin-offs. Forbes‘The Walking Dead’ Season 11 Starts Strong, Minus One Old Trick

Did Maggie die on walking dead?

Despite severe head trauma, Glenn manages to tell Maggie he'll find her before being killed by Negan. After the Saviors depart, the now widow of Glenn is distraught and tells the others to return to Alexandria and prepare for war, and let her get to Hilltop by herself. wikipedia.orgMaggie Greene - Wikipedia

But there was perhaps an even more gasp-inducing moment between the two earlier in the episode. Convinced that Maggie had only brought him down into the zombie-infested D.C. metro tunnels to kill him, Negan shot back that he would not allow her to put him down like a dog "like Glenn was." Considering Negan is the one who put Maggie's husband down — bashing his skull in with a barbed-wire covered baseball bat right in front of her — it was a loaded comment to say the least.

What was Cohan's reaction when she first saw the line in the script? "It was disgusting," she says. "When I read that, I thought it was just pathetic for Negan to do that."

The two share an interesting dynamic — while Negan appears to be trying to play tough guy with a comment like that, Cohan thinks it shows something else entirely. "You can feel Negan's paranoia," she says. "He really thinks this is what's happening and we're on this death march where I can get him away from Alexandria's eyes to kill him. He's scared of that — and he should be because she's like a hair's breadth away from letting it happen. And she's got a fricking gun in her hand and all these people with her who have been through it together and would do anything for her. He should be scared."

The way Cohan sees it, Negan may have been hoping for Maggie to pull the trigger as an easy (or, at least, easier) way out: "He is at a point where he can't take the tension of it anymore. It's his need to provoke me so much that I might kill him because he's so f---ing scared of being trapped like this is how I justify him saying it."

And, Cohan notes, the actor delivering the line recognized the weight of it as well. "Jeff did not want to say it," says Cohan about the actor having to utter Glenn's [Steven Yeun] name in that way. She's certainly right about that; Jeffrey Dean Morgan explained to EW why he was opposed to delivering the line, saying, "I fought it! That's the one line that I immediately called [showrunner Angela Kang] and I was like, 'I can't say it. I can't f---ing bring up Glenn's name here.'"

But, as we've learned, when Negan gets backed into a corner, he tends to come out swinging — bat or no bat. "The episode is about going deeper and deeper into our own individual hell," Cohan says. "I love when Maggie says to Negan earlier [before they enter the subway tunnels], 'What, you don't want to go down there?' And it's almost like, 'I've been there. And I know you've probably been there, but we're going there again.'"

We'll find out if that decision winds up being the worst one Maggie ever made, or if she somehow makes it out alive and ends up giving in to that first impulse after all.

Read full article at Entertainment Weekly News

The Walking Dead Season 11 Episode 1 Review – Acheron Part I

Den of Geek 24 August, 2021 - 07:20pm

A desperate survival mission and a desperate escape attempt uncover some awkward new information for unlikely people on The Walking Dead season 11 premiere.

It’s amazing what Jeffrey Dean Morgan has been able to accomplish with Negan’s redemption arc in a few short episodes of The Walking Dead. It wasn’t all that long ago that Negan was still a villain, but a great bottle episode and a mission behind enemy lines to save Alexandria is enough to push him well down the road to a redemption arc, even if Maggie seems bound and determined not to fall for it.

At no point during “Acheron Part 1” is Negan unreasonable; if anything, he’s the only reasonable member of the party, and when he speaks up, it’s clear that people are listening to him to Maggie’s consternation and detriment. It’s not that Maggie is being unreasonable as much as it is Negan is being reasonable, and that creates some issues in the group. Maggie has a right to be angry, and all of her friends are willing to take her side, but Daryl and the Alexandrians know just how much they owe to Negan, and while he’s a dick, he’s still kind of right, which puts them in a quandary.

A recurring Twitter meme springs to mind: the Clickhole headline “Heartbreaking: The Worst Person You Know Just Made A Great Point.” Throughout the episode, Negan keeps making great points. When the rain is too high, when the subway is prone to flooding, when they pass through a mass grave that might still be in use, Negan keeps making great points about the dangers the group faces that Maggie ignores, because she’s in charge. Even when Negan points out she’s not exactly leading well because she’s only paying attention to him (and trying to kill him through misadventure), she can’t argue with him except at the very end when it’s too late to listen to reason and try a different tactic.

One of the big recurring issues for The Walking Dead across its 11 seasons is that leadership comes with a heavy mantle. Either you’re making the decisions all on your own as a Ricktatorship or you’re making them as part of an inefficient Ricktocracy with a council making decisions. Either way, the pressure seems to lie on one person’s head pretty consistently, no matter who was involved in the decision making. Rick, Gabriel, or Maggie, the decisions might be made by the group but the buck tends to stop with whoever the figurehead is.

In the case of the group of Alexandrians tromping through the sewers, it’s Maggie by vote. In the case of the Alexandrians captured by the Commonwealth and taken into an interrogation camp, it’s Eugene by default. Whether these people are best equipped to be in charge is a different story, one that “Acheron: Part I” digs into towards the end of those respective episode segments. Either way, one person’s personal mission ends up getting everyone in deeper than they’d expected, and there’s no easy way out for either side.

Full credit to Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Negan’s behavior is toned down since the change in showrunner and in Angela Kang and Jim Barnes’ script, the former Savior is downright sane and logical, He brings up good points, albeit in an annoying Negan way, and he baits Maggie into a pretty impressive fight between the two of them. Morgan does well with the words he’s given, and his reasoning as to why he’s being dragged along on this desperate mission hits home with the people around him (even Daryl) and the viewer at home.

It makes sense why he’d be brought along, considering Maggie’s antipathy for him, and while Lauren Cohan gives socks to Maggie’s rebuttal, it doesn’t land as solidly as Jeffrey Dean Morgan’s half of the tete-a-tete and it feels a little hollow to suggest that cutting a few hours off of a suicide mission makes upping the danger significantly worth the trade-off and it exposes the rift between Alexandrians (who know what Negan did for them) and Maggie’s group (who only know Negan horror stories). Maggie, to her credit, doesn’t deny Negan’s accusations, and that emotional ramp-up pays dividends at the end of the episode.

The Commonwealth storyline also continues to play out, with some pretty clever montages courtesy of Kang, Barnes, and TV veteran director Kevin Dowling. While the action in the tunnel is straight ahead, all scary noises and shifting zombies in bags, the Commonwealth is a bit more psychological, as Eugene, Ezekiel (a scene-stealing Khary Payton), Yumiko, and Princess all are interrogated by the mysterious intake committee of The Commonwealth and their multi-stage Scientology-like intake system. Ezekiel’s ability to smell a rat is impressive on its own, but Princess is the person who provides the group with the most surprising, and useful, insights thanks to her solid memory and her ability to read the world around her while the rest of the group was busy trying not to go crazy at the hands of their interrogation team. (Paola Lazaro remains a delight in this role at all times in this episode, and is much-needed comic relief.)

There are a lot of positives in “Acheron: Part I,” starting with the terse, wordless cold opening and the brilliant, nervy synth score to the increasing tension in the tunnels under suburban Virginia, but after the heights of the previous season’s COVID episodes, there’s a slight let-down. It’s setting the table, and that can take time. Maggie might lack it, and Alexandria might not have time for it, but patience tends to be rewarded in the end.

Ron Hogan is a freelance writer from Louisville, Kentucky who got an English degree from a college no one has ever heard of. After dropping out…

'The Walking Dead' Season 11 Premiere Recap And Review: Acheron Part 1

Forbes 24 August, 2021 - 07:20pm

The Walking Dead’s Season 11 premiere opens to silence. Not a word is spoken for the first twelve minutes of the episode—aside from some sign language—which is a pretty bold choice for a show not exactly known for its quiet moments. It reminds me of the opening to Wall-E, the Pixar film about a trash robot which also opened with a startlingly dialogue-free intro.

Our heroes have found an army bunker of sorts. All the troops inside were long ago zombified and have lain in an undead hibernation for what appears to be a very long time.

Daryl, Carol, Maggie and a handful of others descend into the bunker with large duffel bags, tip-toe past the sleeping zombies, and load up their bags with a bunch of dehydrated army rations—a welcome find for a group that’s low on supplies.

Everything is going hunky-dory until one of the belaying lines they’re using to pull supplies out of the bunker breaks. Daryl is able to catch the bag, but he cuts his hand in the process and a single drop of blood falls onto a zombie’s face below, waking him. Soon all the dead are shambling toward them.

It’s a fight for their life, though they’re able to find some automatic assault rifles among the fallen soldiers, which helps.

Mostly this is a tense, fun scene, but then Carol has to go and be reckless and ridiculous again. Instead of escaping when she has the chance, she goes and loads up another bag of supplies.

This might seem like bravery, but it’s so unnecessary. Honestly, there’s no reason she couldn’t escape with the others and go back for more later. They’ve already killed off a ton of the zombies in the building. No reason not to plan out some way to kill off the rest. After all, there are likely more supplies, guns and ammo down there all ripe for the plucking.

How valuable would a handful of assault rifles and a new stock of ammunition be in a world with very few bullets? Certainly valuable enough to go make a plan and come back later.

But no, off they go, hopefully with the vast majority of rations scavenged, and head back to Alexandria. Here, the show is quick to reassert the tension between Maggie and Negan. I can’t say I’m thrilled by this plot-line. Negan killed Glenn what—six or seven in-show years ago (and five years ago for us) and Maggie’s already chosen to let him live, has already shown him mercy. He’s proven himself a valuable and trusted ally to the group, though they still often treat him like a black sheep. At some point this show needs to stop treating Negan like he’s this special redeemed bad guy. Lots of these survivors have done crappy, awful things over the years. Get over it.

I’m just not sure that there’s that much story to squeeze from this old rock, but we shall see.

Even with the rations the group brings back to Alexandria, it’s not enough to sustain the community. The town itself has been destroyed by the Whisperers. The food is gone. There is no game to hunt, no crops to harvest. One might think this would be a good time to return to the bunker and make sure every single ration was grabbed, but Maggie has another idea: Take the fight to the Reapers instead.

This is the group that took out Maggie’s old community and the reason she and her rag-tag band of sidekicks showed up at Alexandria. They apparently left behind a good deal of food and all they have to do is fight for it—against an enemy that’s shown to be incredibly violent and resourceful.

Not everyone is up for this fight. Carol and Aaron have no intention of going. Alden, Gabriel, Maggie, Negan and Daryl are all for it, though, as are Maggie’s grunts. So they head toward Maggie’s old digs, armed and ready for battle (though they should have considered stopping by that bunker to load up on assault rifles first).

A midnight storm sends them into the subways below Washington D.C. though Negan expresses his deep misgivings. There are water lines down here in the tunnels which, he points out, means the subways flood. It’s raining really hard up above—what’s to stop the tunnels from turning into subterranean rivers?

The tunnels are what give this episode and next week’s “Part II” their titles: Acheron was the “river of woe” in Greek mythology, one of five rivers crisscrossing the underworld. Indeed, the subway turns out to be a hellish place for our heroes, but a fun set-piece for viewers.

My chief complaint about this episode is its cliff-hanger ending and the fact that the two episodes were split across two weeks instead of aired all at once. This first episode feels weirdly truncated all by its lonesome. I watched both episodes at the same time, and they work together really well. I’m not saying shows shouldn’t end on cliff-hangers, either. As far as cliff-hangers go, Negan letting Maggie fall into the zombies below is actually pretty great but only if we believe it’s possible that this is how Maggie dies.

And does anyone think that Maggie is going to die in the first episode of the season? She just came back at the end of Season 10 and made one appearance in the bonus episodes. I won’t spoil what happens in the following episode, but I don’t think anyone here is actually worried that Maggie is a goner.

Indeed, the whole thing reeks a bit of the Glenn dumpster fake-out death back in Season 6 (and I think the first sign that the show was about to go downhill in a bad way).

So while this scene works—Negan’s moment of hesitation, the look on his face as he backs away and leaves Maggie to her fate—it only works in isolation1. It only works if you’re not completely numbed to this kind of “shock” by all the head fakes and other shenanigans that this show has pulled over the years.

Elsewhere, Eugene’s group has been taken to the periphery of the Commonwealth where each member of the foursome is questioned about everything from bowel movements to education history. Yumiko, Ezekiel, Princess and Eugene are each asked hours of questions while their interrogators jot down notes and maintain Very Stern Expressions. We meet Mercer, the red-armored general of the Commonwealth. He’s a tough cookie.

Princess, once again, wins best scene in this subplot. While the others try to figure out how to escape to no avail, she’s been casually observing their stormtrooper guards. She’s learned all their names. She knows that two of the men are having a secret affair and trying to hide it from everyone. She suspects they have sex when the guard changes, which gives Ezekiel an idea on how they could enact their escape.

This is all very funny—I find Princess enormously likable and hilarious—but it leads to an escape attempt that the show doesn’t bother to really explain. One minute they’re talking about how the shift change where the two guards are having illicit encounters could be an escape opportunity, the next Yumiko and Eugene are armored up leading Princess and Ezekiel toward the exit. But . . . how? How did they manage this from within their cage?

They’re stopped at one point by another guard but she tells them to carry on after they make up a story about taking the prisoners to “reprocessing.” It’s all very Star Wars. Hard not to think about Han Solo and Luke Skywalker dressed up in stormtrooper armor, leading Chewie and the droids through the Death Star. I mean, it’s impossible to take stormtroopers seriously and it’s equally impossible to take these Commonwealth mooks seriously. I know this is all based on the comics but still . . . come on.

In any case, as they’re about to make good their escape they come across the Wall of the Lost, where the people of the Commonwealth have posted pictures and notes about missing loved ones. This seems like an . . . odd spot to place this kind of board, tucked away in a dark hallway in a building where they process newcomers, but okay. I’ll just roll with it. The point, of course, is that Yumiko sees a note from her brother and decides that she can’t leave. She needs to find him if he’s truly here.

All told, it’s a fine season premiere that would have been a lot stronger as a two-part premiere all airing at once. Audiences would definitely enjoy this more as a longer single episode rather than two spread out across an entire week. It’s all the same story, the same chain of events, arbitrarily cut off in the middle with a cliff-hanger that is guaranteed to fool only the most gullible of viewers. Episode 2’s cliff-hanger ending, meanwhile, is a lot less gimmicky.

I do think it’s mildly hilarious that they went to such lengths to tiptoe past the zombies in the bunker only to go and instantly kill the inert zombies in the tunnel, but even in this show’s best episodes internal consistency and logic is hardly The Walking Dead’s strong suit. I just roll with it these days. You can’t nitpick everything to death.

Quibbles aside I really enjoyed this episode as well as next week’s and I’m excited to see where this season goes. It probably would have been wise to do a little more with those six bonus episodes so that we could have started Season 11 out with more of a bang, but I don’t need a season premiere to be super epic. I’m fine with more grounded adventures. If you want bombastic nonsense, you can always go watch Fear The Walking Dead instead. Plane crashes, nuclear bombs, that show has everything—except quality control.

At least The Walking Dead hasn’t jumped that many sharks.

What did you think of the Season 11 premiere? Let me know on Facebook or Twitter.

Check out my video review of the first two episodes here:

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook. You can support my work on Patreon and sign up for my newsletter on Substack. Subscribe to my YouTube channel here.

Erik Kain writes a widely read and respected blog about video games, entertainment and culture at Forbes. He is a Shorty Award-nominated journalist and critic whose work

Erik Kain writes a widely read and respected blog about video games, entertainment and culture at Forbes. He is a Shorty Award-nominated journalist and critic whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, The National Review, Mother Jones, True/Slant and elsewhere. Kain co-founded the political commentary blog The League Of Ordinary Gentlemen, whose members have gone on to write at multiple major publications including The New York Times and Slate. He lives in Arizona with his family.

'We Should Talk to Them' Sneak Peek Ep. 1102 | The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead 24 August, 2021 - 07:20pm

But there was perhaps an even more gasp-inducing moment between the two earlier in the episode. Convinced that Maggie had only brought him down into the zombie-infested D.C. metro tunnels to kill him, Negan shot back that he would not allow her to put him down like a dog "like Glenn was." Considering Negan is the one who put Maggie's husband down — bashing his skull in with a barbed-wire covered baseball bat right in front of her — it was a loaded comment to say the least.

What was Cohan's reaction when she first saw the line in the script? "It was disgusting," she says. "When I read that, I thought it was just pathetic for Negan to do that."

The two share an interesting dynamic — while Negan appears to be trying to play tough guy with a comment like that, Cohan thinks it shows something else entirely. "You can feel Negan's paranoia," she says. "He really thinks this is what's happening and we're on this death march where I can get him away from Alexandria's eyes to kill him. He's scared of that — and he should be because she's like a hair's breadth away from letting it happen. And she's got a fricking gun in her hand and all these people with her who have been through it together and would do anything for her. He should be scared."

The way Cohan sees it, Negan may have been hoping for Maggie to pull the trigger as an easy (or, at least, easier) way out: "He is at a point where he can't take the tension of it anymore. It's his need to provoke me so much that I might kill him because he's so f---ing scared of being trapped like this is how I justify him saying it."

And, Cohan notes, the actor delivering the line recognized the weight of it as well. "Jeff did not want to say it," says Cohan about the actor having to utter Glenn's [Steven Yeun] name in that way. She's certainly right about that; Jeffrey Dean Morgan explained to EW why he was opposed to delivering the line, saying, "I fought it! That's the one line that I immediately called [showrunner Angela Kang] and I was like, 'I can't say it. I can't f---ing bring up Glenn's name here.'"

But, as we've learned, when Negan gets backed into a corner, he tends to come out swinging — bat or no bat. "The episode is about going deeper and deeper into our own individual hell," Cohan says. "I love when Maggie says to Negan earlier [before they enter the subway tunnels], 'What, you don't want to go down there?' And it's almost like, 'I've been there. And I know you've probably been there, but we're going there again.'"

We'll find out if that decision winds up being the worst one Maggie ever made, or if she somehow makes it out alive and ends up giving in to that first impulse after all.

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The Walking Dead: World Beyond Airs Season 2 Production Teaser

ComicBook.com 24 August, 2021 - 07:20pm

‘The Walking Dead: World Beyond Season 2’: Release Date, Cast and More

/FILM 23 August, 2021 - 05:30pm

The Walking Dead is walking in every direction with multiple spinoff shows. This ...And More focuses on the second and final season of the limited series, The Walking Dead: World Beyond, where the dead are still walking and eating people, and the Civic Republic Military (CRM) are also killing people.

The Walking Dead: World Beyond returns October 3, 2021, at 10 P.M. ET / 9 P.M. CT on AMC, with new episodes premiering early on AMC+ all season.

The Walking Dead: World Beyond is a two-season limited series spinoff of AMC's long-running The Walking Dead. It focuses on the Civic Republic Military or CRM, a no-good organization that controls three cities in what used to be the United States of America. Two of those cities are Portland, OR, and Omaha, NB, and the number of people in the CRM is in the hundreds of thousands.

They aren't the most benevolent group; once you're part of it, you'll have a hard time getting out. Just ask Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), a major Walking Dead character who presumably has been held by them for years.

World Beyond focuses on a young group of people who are part of the first generation to grow up during a zombie apocalypse. They also may or may not have ties with the CRM. Here's the official synopsis from AMC:

The creators of World Beyond are Scott Gimple and showrunner Matt Negrete. The show is based on a series of graphic novels by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard. Dana Farahani, Siavash Farahani, and Elizabeth Padden are regular writers on the show. Magnus Martens directed three episodes and other directors include Michael Cudlitz and Lily Mariye.

Some cast members returning for season 2 include Alexa Mansour as Hope Bennett, Aliyah Royale as Iris Bennett, Nicolas Cantu as Elton Ortiz, Hal Cumpston as Silas Plaskett, Nico Tortorella as Felix Carlucci, Annet Mahendru as Huck, and Julia Ormond as Elizabeth Kublek. The second season will also have new series regulars Jelani Alladin as Will Campbell, Natalie Gold as Dr. Lyla Bellshaw, Joe Holt as Leopold Bennett, and Ted Sutherland as Percy.

Here's What 'The Walking Dead's' Version Of Metro Looks Like | DCist

DCist 23 August, 2021 - 12:20pm

Spoilers for the Season 11 premiere of The Walking Dead.

If you were in a zombie apocalypse, a dark, scary Metro tunnel might not seem like the most logical place to go.

But that’s where the motley crew of survivors in The Walking Dead found themselves in the final season’s premiere last night.

First, some background. The Walking Dead premiered more than 10 years ago and focused on a group of people trying to survive the zombie apocalypse in Atlanta. The show had critical and rating success for years — peaking at around 14 million viewers per episode in Season 5 — before the quality and ratings took a nosedive. Season 10’s finale, for example, saw 2.73 million viewers.

Anyway, in later seasons they make their way up north to a series of safe zones near what is supposed to be near Alexandria, Va.

Fast forward to Sunday’s episode, “Acheron: Part I.” The group finds themselves leaving Alexandria in a driving storm on a supply run to an outpost called “Meridian” near Bethesda, which is described as a six-hour walk.

They take shelter in a made-up Yellow Line station called “Pyron” with a terminus station of Shady Grove (which is actually on the Red Line, but whatever). The show’s prop department did, however, nail the look of the station signage.

They decide that going through the tunnels is better a choice than stopping and waiting out the storm. Negan, the onetime villain who is trying to earn the group’s trust after a few seasons in their jail, says they need to take “Yellow Line north. Switch to Blue at Reagan National and we hop the Red to Bethesda.”

He used to live in Virginia and is acting as a guide for D.C., but are those directions right?

TV shows and movies have done a pretty good job making the city completely unrecognizable in recent years. Last year, Wonder Woman 1984 gave the District a 1980s makeover; and before that, The Handmaid’s Tale imagined a post-apocalyptic National Mall back in 2019.  And remember when Amazon Prime’s Jack Ryan got his morning commute so drastically wrong?

But back to Negan’s directions. Let’s map it for ourselves:

While there is no Pyron station, I’m assuming in our fictional world there’s a new stop south of Huntington or it’s replacing a current Yellow Line station in Alexandria. And Negan should know that you don’t really “transfer” from the Yellow Line to Blue Line at Reagan. You’d do that at Pentagon where the tunnels split.

At one point we see them exit at an “East Market” station, which if it’s supposed to be Eastern Market would be VERY FAR from Bethesda.

Anyway, it’s a zombie show, so of course, the dead come after them in the tunnel, forcing our heroes to board a Metro train (a fill-in replacement for a real WMATA train) filled with zombies. As you might expect, one of the group gets stuck in a train car, where he’s devoured by the walkers.

Then there’s some exploring of tunnels where people tried to live during the apocalypse. (There are some nods to dystopian class struggle here, too: a body of a man with a suitcase filled with wads of cash handcuffed to his arm, and then another shot of a $100 bill being used as a piece of paper to write a note showing that money became worthless.) We also see what’s supposed to be a Metro poster saying “America doesn’t tolerate racism.”

Negan also talks about what appears to be a high water line along the tunnel walls, showing that they flooded in the past. Indeed, water has been known to get into tunnels during heavy storms and in recent years, Metro has worked on making the system more rainproof and fixing pumps to make sure that water doesn’t stay in the tunnels, which can cause fires.

These aren’t Metro stations or tunnels onscreen — The Walking Dead is largely filmed in Georgia. Metro says they didn’t have any contact with the show, and that none of what appeared in last night’s episode runs against their guidelines about what logos, images, and whatnot can be used in film and TV.

“In the event of a zombie apocalypse, I don’t think anyone would bother to consult the protocols of our Use Regulations,” Metro spokesperson Ian Jannetta tells DCist/WAMU in an email.

D.C.’s Metro has seen some prominence in film and TV before last night — though the results usually aren’t much more realistic than these trains full of zombies. There’s a fictional Georgetown stop in the action thriller No Way Out and a gruesome murder scene in House of Cards (at the similarly fictional “Cathedral Heights” station).

The Walking Dead previously ventured into D.C. in Season 9 to raid a composite version of a Smithsonian museum for a wagon and other old farming tools. That, too, wasn’t filmed in the District.

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