The Windows 11 system requirements aren’t the end of the world

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XDA Developers 04 July, 2021 - 09:45am 29 views

How do I get Windows 11?

Most users will go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and click Check for Updates. If available, you'll see Feature update to Windows 11. Click Download and install. CNETWindows 11: Beta download, new features, device compatibility, price and more explained

Windows 11 users discover controversial new design detail

Creative Bloq 04 July, 2021 - 12:16pm

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It's the end of an error.

Nobody wants to see the 'Blue Screen of Death', the error page that means something's really (really) wrong with your PC. But at 30 years old, the BSOD has reached an almost affectionate level of infamy, to the point that its shock departure from Windows 11 has users feeling a little, well, blue. Because what use is one of the best laptops for graphic design if it doesn't feature a blue screen telling you you've just lost all your work?

Microsoft's famous Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) is changing to black in Windows 11. It's the first big change to the BSOD since the sad face was added in 2012. Details here: https://t.co/ARCRBQjSMM pic.twitter.com/wv1J6RFqtxJuly 1, 2021

As first spotted by The Verge, the famous Blue Screen of Death is now the Black Screen of Death (at least it's still the BSOD, eh?) – which, we have to say, sounds even more sinister. But seeing as the blue screen has been a symbol of catastrophe since the early 90s, we're a little sad to see it go. And it seems we're not alone. 

😥 RIP Blue Screen of Death BSOD https://t.co/VeWKcUxbyaJuly 1, 2021

Nooooo... the old ways must be honored. // Microsoft’s Blue Screen of Death is changing to black in Windows 11 https://t.co/IJkPqKe380July 2, 2021

The Blue Screen of Death first appeared on Windows 3.0 in the early nineties. It's been a mainstay ever since, with the most major recent change being the addition of a sad face in 2012's Windows 8 (because what could be more comforting when you've just lost hours of work than a sad emoticon?).

While Microsoft itself hasn't acknowledged the update in its official Windows 11 release notes, it's made its way into the first Insider Preview for beta users. Time will tell whether Microsoft opts to go back to blue in future releases, but for now, it appears to be the end of an error (sorry). If you'd rather never see a BSOD of either the black or blue variety, check out today's best Mac deals below.

Daniel Piper is senior news editor at Creative Bloq. He is an author, editor and national poetry slam champion, and his debut book of comedy short stories was published in 2018.

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