This Game Might Explain Why Laurence Fishburne Isn't Back in Matrix Resurrections - IGN Daily Fix

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IGN 09 September, 2021 - 06:32pm 17 views

Is Hugo Weaving in Matrix 4?

Unfortunately, Weaving will not be involved in the project. The actor confirmed to Time Out London that he's sitting “Matrix 4” out because of scheduling conflicts with his theater performance of “The Visit.” IndieWireHugo Weaving Says It’s Unfortunate He’s Sitting Out ‘Matrix 4’ Due to Scheduling Conflict

Is the Matrix resurrections a sequel?

Though in some ways a spiritual remake of the original Matrix from 1999 — right down to the choice of color-contrasted pills — Resurrections will also serve as a continuation of the trilogy, with both Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss back as Neo and Trinity. Inverse'Matrix 4' trailer explained: One sequels scene reveals 'Resurrections' twist

Did Morpheus die?

Morpheus is caught off-guard and is unable to dodge the Assassin's bullets. He dies from gunshot wounds. wikipedia.orgMorpheus (The Matrix)

Why It's Impossible to Be Excited About the New Matrix

TheStranger.com 09 September, 2021 - 10:30pm

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Indeed, the former finance minister of Greece, Yanis Varoufakis, once described The Matrix as a documentary of capitalism. But Varoufakis, who clearly subscribes to the Marxist theory of surplus value and its source (labor), needed to say more than this. The film is also (and more so) a documentary about a particular stage in the development of capitalism. In his very long 2019 book, Capital and Ideology, the French economist Thomas Piketty described this stage as “neo-proprietarian." There was, in short, no way the 1970s could have made The Matrix, nor the 1980s, and that's for one simple reason: capitalism was not triumphant during those decades. It was still in its post-World War II slump.

This meant that, in order to maintain power and check labor militancy, capitalism could not let go of institutions and policies it viscerally hated: welfare systems, wages that enjoyed an escalator clause, college costs that did not drown students in debt. Those were the days.

Let us review the economic narratives at play in the major science fiction films leading up to The Matrix. What do we find in Star Wars (1976)? A proletariat caught in a galactic war with Empire. And in Alien (1979)? Labor is bickering about pay and bonuses. And in Aliens (1986) and Robocop (1987)? Corporations are still the bad guys. But at the start of the last decade of the 20th century, the struggle between labor and capital effectively met its end. By appearance (and I want my readers to know that I place a lot of weight on the word appearance) capital won. Labor, in the form of socialist rivals for global dominance, lost. The Berlin Wall was down, and the American Hegelian Francis Fukuyama famously declared the end of history, which, in this context, precisely had as its motor the struggle between labor and capital. 1990 marked the beginning of capitalism's triumphant stage. It had no challenges. It dissolved the social institutions of the three glorious decades and reestablished the full power of property (neo-proprietarianism).

By the time we get to The Matix, labor is silent and corporations are benign. Some hacking is going on here and there, but it is mostly harmless. Neo (Keanu Reeves) works for a tech firm that is nowhere near the monster Tyrell Corporation. It does boring stuff for consumers who are equally as boring. The bosses of Neo's tech company just want their workers to show a little more enthusiasm. And so, The Matrix is about a slumbering proletariat. It will not wake up in a way that alarms the mainstream until the crash of 2008, the end of capitalist triumphalism.

We are not sleeping in the way we did in the 1990s, when there was TINA (There Is No Alternative); but we are not fully awake. We actually have Bernie Sanderses and AOCs, figures who would have been easily marginalized back in the 1990s. And we also have the excessive reaction to the reemergence of anti-proprietarianism (the Trumps and MTGs). Both developments were, for sure, made visible and viable by the ideological (rather than actual) collapse of neo-proprietarianism, which is also called neoliberalism. This is the world that The Matrix Resurrections enters in the Christmas season of 2021. Can we expect it to be a documentary of the current sequence of capitalism? This I very much doubt, and so my best guess is that I will watch the reboot as a sheer spectacle.

Charles Tonderai Mudede, The Stranger’s senior staff writer, is a Zimbabwean-born cultural critic, urbanist, filmmaker, college lecturer, and writer. Mudede collaborated with the director Robinson Devor on three films, two of which, Police Beat and Zoo, premiered at Sundance, and one of which, Zoo, screened at Cannes. He has also written for the New York Times, Cinema Scope, Tank Magazine, e-flux, LA Weekly, and C Theory.

Charles Tonderai Mudede, The Stranger’s senior staff writer, is a Zimbabwean-born cultural critic, urbanist, filmmaker, college lecturer, and writer. Mudede collaborated with the director Robinson Devor on three films, two of which, Police Beat and Zoo, premiered at Sundance, and one of which, Zoo, screened at Cannes. He has also written for the New York Times, Cinema Scope, Tank Magazine, e-flux, LA Weekly, and C Theory.

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