This year's first supermoon, the 'Pink Moon,' will rise on Monday. Here's how to spot the rare event.

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Business Insider 22 April, 2021 - 01:19pm 10 views

What is a pink moon?

The Pink Moon is the Old Farmer's Almanac nickname for April's full moon. According to the Almanac, the “Pink Moon” got its name because it often corresponds with the early springtime blooms of creeping phlox, a flower native to northern and eastern North America. The Denver ChannelSuper Pink Moon to be visible early next week

When is the Pink Moon 2021?

The “Super Pink Moon” will be 222,211 miles/357,615 kilometers from Earth on April 26, 2021, which isn't quite as close as the next full Moon—the “Super Flower Moon Eclipse”—which will be the biggest and best “supermoon” of 2021. ForbesWhen, Where And How You Can See The ‘Super Pink Moon’ Rise This Week, 2021’s Best Supermoon So Far

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It's the first of two supermoons in 2021: Another is coming down the pike in May. The two moons are "virtually tied" in terms of size and brightness, according to NASA.

April's full moon is known as the "Pink Moon," though that doesn't necessarily mean it will shine pink in the sky. The nickname comes from a pink spring flower found in North America, according to The Old Farmer's Almanac.

The Pink Moon will be highest in the sky at 11:32 p.m. Eastern Time Monday night. It will appear full on Tuesday night, too.

Astronomers don't love the moniker "supermoon," and tend to squabble over which full moons qualify as supermoons. An astrologer coined the term in 1979.

Generally, a supermoon refers to a full moon that occurs when the moon is within 90% of its perigee — the point of the moon's orbit that brings it closest to Earth. According to NASA, supermoons happen a few times a year at most.

The moon's 27-day orbit around the Earth looks like an ellipse, rather than a circle, due to gravity from the sun and Earth pushing and pulling on the moon as it travels through space. So there are points along its orbital path that bring the moon closer or farther away from our planet. (Think of a rubber band around a ball: If you pull both ends, it makes an oval, so two sides get closer to the ball, while the ends get farther away.)

When the moon hits perigee, it gets within 224,000 miles of Earth. (Usually, it's 238,000 miles away.) That difference in distance will make a supermoon appear brighter and bigger than a usual full moon, though the change is difficult to detect with the naked eye

To best see the supermoon, experts recommend heading outside either just after moonrise, when the moon is low, or as the moon is setting. Full moons that are higher up in the sky look dimmer and smaller than moons close to the horizon.

In New York City, moonrise will be at 7:24 p.m. local time Monday and the moon will set about 11 hours later.

If you miss this supermoon, though, don't worry — the next one is May 26. NASA said the May supermoon, known as the Flower Moon, will be 98 miles closer to Earth than the pink supermoon.

April's Pink Moon is named after the pink creeping phlox plant common in the Eastern US. It has also been called the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon, according to NASA.

But the nickname is misleading: The moon is always the same color, and likely won't look pink when it rises Monday.

Sometimes, like in the photo above, the moon can appear pink as it's rising due to oxygen and nitrogen particles in Earth's atmosphere.

Oxygen and nitrogen are better at scattering colors made by certain kinds of light — colors with shorter wavelengths, like blue or violet — while colors with longer wavelengths like red, orange, or yellow are left behind. So when the moon sits low on the horizon, where the atmosphere is thickest, those longer wavelength colors dominate what you see, sometimes giving the moon a pinkish hue.

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Don't miss the Pink Moon! Supermoon set to dazzle the night sky MONDAY

Daily Mail 23 April, 2021 - 08:00am

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

A rare full moon is set to appear in the night sky Monday, April 26 that will be one of the brightest and biggest this year.

Named the ‘Pink Moon,’ this supermoon will be 30 percent more dazzling and 14 percent larger than the average full moon – but do not expect the lunar surface to be glowing pink.

The name derives from the early springtime blooms of certain flowers native to eastern North America that are commonly known as creeping phlox – but has been referred to ‘moss pink.’

This full moon—which is the first of two supermoons this year—will be visible after sunset and reach peak illumination at 11:32pm ET.

A rare full moon is set to appear in the night sky Monday, April 26 that will be one of the brightest and biggest this year. Pictured is the Pink Moon captured in 2019 behind Mow Cop Castle on the Cheshire/Staffordshire border.

A second supermoon is set for May 26, making the pair the closest to appear this year.

On Monday, the moon will appear full for nearly three days around the same time, 11:32pm ET, starting Sunday through Wednesday morning.

But it will glow in its full brilliance Monday evening.

In New York City, moonrise is scheduled for 7:24pm ET and Earth's natural satellite will set about 11 hours later.

On Monday, the moon will appear full for nearly three days around the same time, 11:32pm ET, starting Sunday through Wednesday morning. But it will glow in its full brilliance Monday evening. People play volleyball on the beach as the Pink Moon rises in the sky over the Salmiya district in 2019

However, if you miss the Pink Moon, the Flower Moon will rise May 26 and be 98 miles closer to Earth.

Space is also putting on a show this evening with the peak of the stunning Lyrid meteor shower that is set to see up to 18 shooting stars streaking across the sky every hour from about midnight.

While the shooting stars can be seen anywhere on Earth, the Northern Hemisphere will have the best views, especially rural areas away from city lights.

While the shower lacks persistent trails, it can produce fireballs, which are exceptionally bright meteors that can be seen over a very broad area.

The best place to see the shower is the Northern Hemisphere, though they can be seen to a lesser extent from the Southern Hemisphere.

Rural locations, far from the light pollution of industrial areas, will have the best view.

Unfortunately, the shower coincides with a bright waning gibbous moon, a phase that comes very close to being a full moon.

Space is also putting on a show this evening with the peak of the stunning Lyrid meteor shower that is set to see up to 18 shooting stars streaking across the sky every hour from about midnight. Pictured is Forest Hill illuminated under the shooting stars on a clear night on April 21, 2020 in London

The added moonlight means less of the shower will be visible, though even without a telescope there will be plenty to see.

To locate where the meteors will be passing through, locate the brightest star in the constellation Lyra to find what astronomers call the 'radiant.'

The Lyrid meteor shower received its name because of the trails that follow stars, which seem to radiate from the constellation Lyra (the Lyre).

The debris actually comes from the orbit of the comet Thatcher.

Although Thatcher is quite far from Earth, orbiting the Sun only once every 415 years, it sprinkles cosmic detritus far and wide along its path.

As they burn up the meteors streak through the sky at speeds of about 110,000 miles per hour.

Though the Lyrids aren't the brightest shower —the Perseuds and Geminids both outshine them — they are one of the first observed by humans.

They were first spotted by Chinese astronomers in 687 BC.

While meteor showers can be seen from Earth, the meteoroids that cause them are actually no bigger than pebbles.

The phenomenon, known as the 'Pink Moon', earns its name from the flowering of the brightly-coloured herb 'moss pink,' which typically coincides with its arrival. 

It’s also known as the Egg Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon, Growing Moon or Full Fish Moon. 

The name comes from the Herb moss pink phlox, or 'wild ground' phlox, which blooms in early spring in the US and Canada.

 In the Northern Hemisphere, the April full moon lines up with the blooming of one of spring's earliest-flowering plants – wild ground phlox, or 'moss pink'. 

The phenomenon, known as the 'Pink Moon', earns its name from the flowering of the brightly-coloured herb 'moss pink'

The pink moon, which is also known as the grass moon and the egg moon, was given its moniker by Native Americans, who provided a name for each full moon to help them keep track of time. 

 Native Americans have a name for the full moon of every month in the calendar, including Wolf Moon for January, Snow Moon for February and Worm Moon for March – then Flower Moon in May. Strawberry Moon is for June, Buck Moon is for July and Sturgeon Moon is for August. 

In September, there is a Harvest Moon, Hunter's Moon is in October, Beaver Moon is in November and Cold Moon is in December. 

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These Full Moon Rituals Are Actually Magick

Cosmopolitan.com 22 April, 2021 - 03:27pm

So you want to get witchy? Well, then you simply have to love the Moon—that’s just how it is. If you want to supercharge your life with lunar power, a Full Moon is the time to do it. Why? Well, the Full Moon is the ~energetic peak~ of the month, and you can tap into its power with lunar rituals. Sound magick? Yes, it actually is.

Ritual 1: Make a sigil for your intention

Full Moons and New Moons are both good times to form an intention—basically a tweet for your spiritual life that acts as a guiding force for your magick. For a Full Moon intention, you can either focus on something you want to call into your life (because a Full Moon is the peak of the lunar cycle) or something you want to let go of (because each day after the Full Moon, the lunar light shrinks, reflecting your own ability to let shit go).

Choose something specific you want, and write it down. Once you have your intention, you can make a charged symbol, known as a sigil, to begin your manifestation (aka asking the universe for what you want and being open to receiving it).

Ritual 2: Write affirmations for the rest of the lunar cycle

Just like sigils, you can use a Full Moon affirmation either to call something in or to release any limiting beliefs you have. Choose your affirmation carefully, because you’re going to be saying it for two whole weeks.

An affirmation to support your intention may be: I am a rich bitch; I am an abundant witch; I receive with ease. An affirmation to release negative beliefs may be: I release all negative beliefs that limit my ability to be prosperous.

Say your affirmations three times each, every day for the two weeks following the Full Moon, and watch your life transform. P.S. You can turn both of these into sigils as well.

Ritual 3: Charge a candle with your intention

Once you have your intention, you can use it to charge a white or silver candle (white is for attraction, and silver is for lunar magick). Here’s how:

Have fun and enjoy some Moon magick!

Pink Moon

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