TikTok doctor, mom of 4 answers COVID questions she gets asked the most by parents

Health

Yahoo Life 13 October, 2021 - 11:44am

With that in mind, Yahoo Life tapped Dr. Jessica Kiss — better known as AskDrMom to her 20,000 followers on TikTok — a family medicine physician and mom of four who has been sharing health information on the platform to help educate others. “Since the pandemic started, I’ve gotten lots of questions about what’s going on with COVID and their families,” Kiss tells Yahoo Life.

Here, Kiss answers some of the COVID-related questions she gets asked the most by parents.

“Pfizer has already shown data that it’s a pretty safe vaccination,” says Kiss. “It looks like it’s as safe as giving it to older children.” Results from Phase 2/3 of Pfizer’s clinical trials in children ages 5 to 11 showed the vaccine to be “safe” and “well tolerated,” with “robust” antibody responses.

It’s also worth pointing out that kids 5 to 11 years old will get a “smaller dose than the older kids and adults,” says Kiss. Kids in that age group would get a two-shot regimen of 10 micrograms, which is a third of the dosage used for adolescents and adults, administered 21 days apart. Despite the lower dosage of the COVID vaccine for children, Kiss notes “it’s been proven to show just as good of an immune response.”

Kiss says the side effects from COVID vaccines for children ages 5 to 11 will likely be similar to the side effects some adults experience post-vaccine. “So they could, in the first 24 hours, have headache, have a little tummy ache, or even a small fever, but it should go away within that 24-hour period, just like with older kids and adults.”

As with adolescents and adults, other possible side effects include the “remote” chance of a severe allergic reaction, reports Pfizer, as well as muscle aches, joint pain, or fatigue. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, myocarditis — inflammation of the heart muscle — is an “extremely rare” side effect of COVID vaccinations. The AAP points out that getting COVID-19 itself carries a much higher risk of myocarditis than getting vaccinated.

More research is needed to understand if there’s a possible connection between COVID vaccination and temporary changes to the menstrual cycle — and in fact, five U.S. institutions were recently awarded grants to study this more. A recent study published in the British Medical Journal found that while a link is “plausible,” any menstrual changes were short lived.

“Most people who report a change to their period after vaccination find that it returns to normal the following cycle and, importantly, there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination adversely affects fertility,” wrote the study authors.

Several factors can affect menstrual cycles, including stress and illness. As Kiss points out, “If you’ve ever been sick as a woman or a person who menstruates in general, you might notice that your menstrual cycle is kind of wacky,” says Kiss. “It can be longer, shorter and just strange in general. This is not going to be dissimilar with COVID-19.”

Kiss adds: “The risk of this seems to be pretty small, and it does not impair fertility by having a strange menstrual cycle once. So, in my opinion, parents of daughters should not wait to get the vaccination.”

If you’re in this type of situation, it’s all about taking precautionary measures. “You need to make sure that all of the other factors are accounted for — meaning, those workers are masking consistently around your children and others outside of their care,” says Kiss. That means “when they go out, they’re wearing masks, that they’re social distancing, and they’re limiting contact and exposure with others,” she says.

It depends, says Kiss. “If your family is at higher risk for a complication from COVID-19, the [vaccinated] person who is watching your child could still get exposed and spread COVID-19 to your unvaccinated child and thus to the rest of your family,” she says. However, “if you trust that that person who is vaccinated is masking consistently and doing all the other things right around the unvaccinated person, it may be okay for them to continue to watch your child, depending upon your family risk.”

It’s possible for a vaccinated mom to pass antibodies to her child through breast milk, notes Kiss — and recent research published in the journal Pediatrics backs that up. The same study found that the impact was greatest for mothers breastfeeding past 23 months.

However, Kiss adds there’s an “asterisk to that, though.” She explains that “it looks like, in general, that concentration [of antibodies] is going to be highest and most effective in younger babies nursing. But that research is still pending.”

Kiss shares that after she got the second dose of her COVID vaccination back in January, she was still nursing her 2-year-old daughter and wondered if she could pass antibodies to her child through breast milk. So Kiss tested her own breast milk in her medical office “before there was any of this research,” she says, and was “screaming” when tests revealed there were, in fact, protective antibodies in her breast milk. “And that’s because antibodies in breast milk at a high enough level could be significant to help develop immunity,” Kiss says.

Like any protective parent, Kiss candidly shares that even she was “a little worried” about giving the COVID vaccine to her children. She says that all of her children are involved in the vaccine’s clinical trials, with three of her kids in the 5 to 11 year old age group and her 2-year-old in the under 5 age group. “I will tell you, I was worried at first because of fear of the unknown,” shares Kiss. “But I knew in my heart that it was OK because it had been proven safe for older kids, and the dosage is much smaller in children that are younger.”

For parents who have concerns about their children getting vaccinated, Kiss strongly recommends talking with your kid’s pediatrician. “Any time you’re worried about anything with your child’s health, you really should contact your health care provider,” says Kiss. “That is what we are here for. That is our job, and we do it day in and day out.”

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Read full article at Yahoo Life

TikTok doctor, mom of 4 answers COVID questions she gets asked the most by parents

Good Morning America 13 October, 2021 - 11:44am

With that in mind, Yahoo Life tapped Dr. Jessica Kiss — better known as AskDrMom to her 20,000 followers on TikTok — a family medicine physician and mom of four who has been sharing health information on the platform to help educate others. “Since the pandemic started, I’ve gotten lots of questions about what’s going on with COVID and their families,” Kiss tells Yahoo Life.

Here, Kiss answers some of the COVID-related questions she gets asked the most by parents.

“Pfizer has already shown data that it’s a pretty safe vaccination,” says Kiss. “It looks like it’s as safe as giving it to older children.” Results from Phase 2/3 of Pfizer’s clinical trials in children ages 5 to 11 showed the vaccine to be “safe” and “well tolerated,” with “robust” antibody responses.

It’s also worth pointing out that kids 5 to 11 years old will get a “smaller dose than the older kids and adults,” says Kiss. Kids in that age group would get a two-shot regimen of 10 micrograms, which is a third of the dosage used for adolescents and adults, administered 21 days apart. Despite the lower dosage of the COVID vaccine for children, Kiss notes “it’s been proven to show just as good of an immune response.”

Kiss says the side effects from COVID vaccines for children ages 5 to 11 will likely be similar to the side effects some adults experience post-vaccine. “So they could, in the first 24 hours, have headache, have a little tummy ache, or even a small fever, but it should go away within that 24-hour period, just like with older kids and adults.”

As with adolescents and adults, other possible side effects include the “remote” chance of a severe allergic reaction, reports Pfizer, as well as muscle aches, joint pain, or fatigue. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, myocarditis — inflammation of the heart muscle — is an “extremely rare” side effect of COVID vaccinations. The AAP points out that getting COVID-19 itself carries a much higher risk of myocarditis than getting vaccinated.

More research is needed to understand if there’s a possible connection between COVID vaccination and temporary changes to the menstrual cycle — and in fact, five U.S. institutions were recently awarded grants to study this more. A recent study published in the British Medical Journal found that while a link is “plausible,” any menstrual changes were short lived.

“Most people who report a change to their period after vaccination find that it returns to normal the following cycle and, importantly, there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination adversely affects fertility,” wrote the study authors.

Several factors can affect menstrual cycles, including stress and illness. As Kiss points out, “If you’ve ever been sick as a woman or a person who menstruates in general, you might notice that your menstrual cycle is kind of wacky,” says Kiss. “It can be longer, shorter and just strange in general. This is not going to be dissimilar with COVID-19.”

Kiss adds: “The risk of this seems to be pretty small, and it does not impair fertility by having a strange menstrual cycle once. So, in my opinion, parents of daughters should not wait to get the vaccination.”

If you’re in this type of situation, it’s all about taking precautionary measures. “You need to make sure that all of the other factors are accounted for — meaning, those workers are masking consistently around your children and others outside of their care,” says Kiss. That means “when they go out, they’re wearing masks, that they’re social distancing, and they’re limiting contact and exposure with others,” she says.

It depends, says Kiss. “If your family is at higher risk for a complication from COVID-19, the [vaccinated] person who is watching your child could still get exposed and spread COVID-19 to your unvaccinated child and thus to the rest of your family,” she says. However, “if you trust that that person who is vaccinated is masking consistently and doing all the other things right around the unvaccinated person, it may be okay for them to continue to watch your child, depending upon your family risk.”

It’s possible for a vaccinated mom to pass antibodies to her child through breast milk, notes Kiss — and recent research published in the journal Pediatrics backs that up. The same study found that the impact was greatest for mothers breastfeeding past 23 months.

However, Kiss adds there’s an “asterisk to that, though.” She explains that “it looks like, in general, that concentration [of antibodies] is going to be highest and most effective in younger babies nursing. But that research is still pending.”

Kiss shares that after she got the second dose of her COVID vaccination back in January, she was still nursing her 2-year-old daughter and wondered if she could pass antibodies to her child through breast milk. So Kiss tested her own breast milk in her medical office “before there was any of this research,” she says, and was “screaming” when tests revealed there were, in fact, protective antibodies in her breast milk. “And that’s because antibodies in breast milk at a high enough level could be significant to help develop immunity,” Kiss says.

Like any protective parent, Kiss candidly shares that even she was “a little worried” about giving the COVID vaccine to her children. She says that all of her children are involved in the vaccine’s clinical trials, with three of her kids in the 5 to 11 year old age group and her 2-year-old in the under 5 age group. “I will tell you, I was worried at first because of fear of the unknown,” shares Kiss. “But I knew in my heart that it was OK because it had been proven safe for older kids, and the dosage is much smaller in children that are younger.”

For parents who have concerns about their children getting vaccinated, Kiss strongly recommends talking with your kid’s pediatrician. “Any time you’re worried about anything with your child’s health, you really should contact your health care provider,” says Kiss. “That is what we are here for. That is our job, and we do it day in and day out.”

Foreign travelers who received a COVID-19 vaccine approved by the FDA or WHO will be able to enter the U.S. next month, a CDC spokesperson says.

An infectious disease expert weighs in on when to use these tests at home.

A similar incident occurred last month in Baltimore, Maryland, when a couple took their 4-year-old to get a flu shot but received the Pfizer vaccine instead.

The other day, my seven-year-old daughter looked me in the eye and asked, in a lawyerly tone, “Is the Tooth Fairy real?”Something about the directness of both her gaze and her question made me stop and, after...

"Never going to take your wonder drug," the indictment alleges Eli Scott Harris sent the doctor. "My 12 gauge promises I won't."

Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 460 police officers have died from duty-related COVID-19 cases.

Hitting the streets in search of candy this Halloween? Pediatrician Dr. Harvey Karp says trick-or-treating can be safe for kids this year as long as parents follow a few guidelines.

"My husband is a truck driver and he is gone all week... Whenever he tries to give any input into our son I get mad."

"What wine pairs well with Common Core math?"

"After a couple weeks on medication, my symptoms dissipated drastically. My digestive issues disappeared, my fevers went away and I was sleeping better at night."

All tourists will then have to pre-pay for an arrival test and isolate until they receive a negative result.

Sage Steele caused a stir after questioning Barack Obama's race and how women dressed in the workplace in a recent podcast appearance.

"We have decided Kyrie Irving will not play or practice with the team until he is eligible to be a full participant," Brooklyn Nets GM Sean Marks said in a statement.

From taking precautions to protect their physical safety to preparing them mentally for the strain of the day, here's how experts say to empower teens to attend protests.

On August 24, the Department of Defense ordered that all US troops must be vaccinated. A number of troops have quit in protest.

The U.S. will allow fully vaccinated foreign nationals to cross its land borders with Canada and Mexico for tourism starting next month.

Stage IV breast cancer isn’t curable—but it is treatable.

The first two days of the school year were bittersweet, as they should be. After all, this is the first year both my children (four and six years old) would be in school, and the first time since we became...

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