TimTheTatman reveals how Dr Disrespect played a big role in his shock Twitch exit

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Dexerto 04 September, 2021 - 03:12am 56 views

Did Timthetatman leave twitch?

Tim “TimTheTatman” Betar is the second Twitch streamer to leave the platform this week to broadcast exclusively on YouTube. Betar announced his departure from Twitch on Twitter Wednesday. Ben “DrLupo” Lupo announced Monday that he, too, was leaving the platform. PolygonTwitch loses streamer TimTheTatman for YouTube

Shortly after Benjamin ‘DrLupo’ Lupo announced he was officially leaving Twitch after signing a lucrative deal with YouTube that set him up for life, TimTheTatman confirmed he was jumping ship too for similar reasons.

Not only were his fans happy for him, but they were also thrilled to see him reunite with Dr Disrespect, who greeted him with a warm welcome ahead of their epic reunion stream.

While playing Warzone during his very first YouTube broadcast, Tim revealed he’d missed playing with Doc and implied it played a big role in his decision.

Tim said he loves playing with all his friends but admitted Doc was “an easy top three” in terms of the content they produced, and he missed that.

“When we are streaming together, both of us are having a great time because it’s just such easy back and forth. He’s quick-witted, and I’m a literal sit-down comedian. And that dynamic, I know a lot of people missed that, myself included.”

Tim re-iterated that he was “very excited” to play with Doc again. It might not have been the main reason behind his switch, but it certainly played a part.

And now that they’re playing games together again, the real winners are their fans, who can all enjoy their banter once again.

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Streamlabs Introduces ‘Safe Mode’ in Response to Recent Twitch ‘Hate Raids’

GameRant 03 September, 2021 - 05:41pm

In a recent post to its site, the Twitch streaming software has announced it will be implementing a new "safe mode" for users, which it believes will go a long way to "fostering a supportive environment" for streamers. The idea behind this new feature is that it will stem any malicious behavior or harassment, which many have recently been experiencing. It also says it will help to prevent spam content, something which anyone who has been involved in a broadcast knows all too well.

The way it works is, users will be able to activate safe mode, which will clear recent events, disable follower alerts, and clear additional things like raids, hosts etc. Combined with Cloudbot, the software's auto moderation tool, the new mode will be able to put the stream chat into followers-only mode, in which only users who follow a streamer's channel will be able to take part in chat. Along with OBS, it's one of the most popular streaming tools out there, and with Streamlabs now being available on Mac, this new safe mode is likely to be useful to a lot of content creators.

On top of hate raids some of the big Twitch names are beginning to leave the platform in favor of alternatives. With the likes of DrLupo signing a huge contract with YouTube, and Dr Disrespect suing the company over his being banned last year, it seems as though the site may be in a bit of trouble. The fact that Streamlabs has come along with a solution to the recent controversies, before Twitch itself introduces measures, could be a bad sign.

Source: Streamlabs

Streamlabs Introduces ‘Safe Mode’ in Response to Recent Twitch ‘Hate Raids’

GameRant 03 September, 2021 - 05:41pm

In a recent post to its site, the Twitch streaming software has announced it will be implementing a new "safe mode" for users, which it believes will go a long way to "fostering a supportive environment" for streamers. The idea behind this new feature is that it will stem any malicious behavior or harassment, which many have recently been experiencing. It also says it will help to prevent spam content, something which anyone who has been involved in a broadcast knows all too well.

The way it works is, users will be able to activate safe mode, which will clear recent events, disable follower alerts, and clear additional things like raids, hosts etc. Combined with Cloudbot, the software's auto moderation tool, the new mode will be able to put the stream chat into followers-only mode, in which only users who follow a streamer's channel will be able to take part in chat. Along with OBS, it's one of the most popular streaming tools out there, and with Streamlabs now being available on Mac, this new safe mode is likely to be useful to a lot of content creators.

On top of hate raids some of the big Twitch names are beginning to leave the platform in favor of alternatives. With the likes of DrLupo signing a huge contract with YouTube, and Dr Disrespect suing the company over his being banned last year, it seems as though the site may be in a bit of trouble. The fact that Streamlabs has come along with a solution to the recent controversies, before Twitch itself introduces measures, could be a bad sign.

Source: Streamlabs

Streamlabs Introduces ‘Safe Mode’ in Response to Recent Twitch ‘Hate Raids’

GameRant 03 September, 2021 - 05:41pm

In a recent post to its site, the Twitch streaming software has announced it will be implementing a new "safe mode" for users, which it believes will go a long way to "fostering a supportive environment" for streamers. The idea behind this new feature is that it will stem any malicious behavior or harassment, which many have recently been experiencing. It also says it will help to prevent spam content, something which anyone who has been involved in a broadcast knows all too well.

The way it works is, users will be able to activate safe mode, which will clear recent events, disable follower alerts, and clear additional things like raids, hosts etc. Combined with Cloudbot, the software's auto moderation tool, the new mode will be able to put the stream chat into followers-only mode, in which only users who follow a streamer's channel will be able to take part in chat. Along with OBS, it's one of the most popular streaming tools out there, and with Streamlabs now being available on Mac, this new safe mode is likely to be useful to a lot of content creators.

On top of hate raids some of the big Twitch names are beginning to leave the platform in favor of alternatives. With the likes of DrLupo signing a huge contract with YouTube, and Dr Disrespect suing the company over his being banned last year, it seems as though the site may be in a bit of trouble. The fact that Streamlabs has come along with a solution to the recent controversies, before Twitch itself introduces measures, could be a bad sign.

Source: Streamlabs

A Day Off Twitch gave the platform its lowest viewer hours of 2021

VentureBeat 03 September, 2021 - 03:46pm

On Wednesday, streamers and viewers boycotted Twitch as part of an organized protest, A Day Off Twitch. Users wanted to highlight the platform’s issues with harassment, notably the surge in “hate raids.” The raid feature lets a streamer send their viewers to a channel. Some have abused this to target POC content creators with waves of racist and hateful messages.

With statistics from the analytics team at Gamesight, we can learn the impact the protest had. As you can see from the chart above,  Twitch lost about 1 million viewers during the protest, and the number actually represent the site’s lowest total for the year.

“We’ve compared yesterday’s data to bigger-picture averages as well as daily Wednesday engagement [to account for streamers who regularly take this day off] throughout the last two months, and we certainly view yesterday’s overall viewer hours as a notable anomaly,” said Gamesight CEO Adam Lieb. “The last time daily viewer hours on Twitch were this low was back over in Christmas during December 2020; this is the lowest viewer hours have been for all of 2021.”

You can see September 1’s numbers compared to previous Wednesdays on Twitch in the chart below.

Above: Twitch viewer hours change from Wednesday-to-Wednesday.

September 1 has 54,877,853 viewer hours. That is a bit more than 15% lower than the 65,167,792 viewer hours from the preceding Wednesday. Some streamers couldn’t engage in the protest, as some have contractual obligations with Twitch or sponsors that require them to stream. Otherwise, the drop could have been higher.

All of this is to say that the protest did make a difference. Today, Twitch has sent an email out to creators noting that it has heard the criticism and that it is working on measures to address hate raids.

Twitch's email to creators following the recent hate-bot attacks pic.twitter.com/cIV8B91hAO

— Catalin Cimpanu (@campuscodi) September 3, 2021

Of course, promises of future support do nothing to help those suffering from the problem right now, and the tools that Twitch offers in the meantime clearly do little to protect its content creators. For many, it’s not enough.

— ?DinomamaUK? -♿️??️‍?? (@DinomamaUK) September 3, 2021

The @Twitch email about hate raids is reactive, not proactive, coming a full two days after the boycott. It once again puts the responsibility on streamers to manage these raids when they happen, with no concrete information on what *they* are doing about it #TwitchDoBetter

— Cobra Cal ? (@callum_morton) September 3, 2021

Hopefully, the real help will be coming soon.

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A Day Off Twitch gave the platform its lowest viewer hours of 2021

TimTheTatman 03 September, 2021 - 03:46pm

On Wednesday, streamers and viewers boycotted Twitch as part of an organized protest, A Day Off Twitch. Users wanted to highlight the platform’s issues with harassment, notably the surge in “hate raids.” The raid feature lets a streamer send their viewers to a channel. Some have abused this to target POC content creators with waves of racist and hateful messages.

With statistics from the analytics team at Gamesight, we can learn the impact the protest had. As you can see from the chart above,  Twitch lost about 1 million viewers during the protest, and the number actually represent the site’s lowest total for the year.

“We’ve compared yesterday’s data to bigger-picture averages as well as daily Wednesday engagement [to account for streamers who regularly take this day off] throughout the last two months, and we certainly view yesterday’s overall viewer hours as a notable anomaly,” said Gamesight CEO Adam Lieb. “The last time daily viewer hours on Twitch were this low was back over in Christmas during December 2020; this is the lowest viewer hours have been for all of 2021.”

You can see September 1’s numbers compared to previous Wednesdays on Twitch in the chart below.

Above: Twitch viewer hours change from Wednesday-to-Wednesday.

September 1 has 54,877,853 viewer hours. That is a bit more than 15% lower than the 65,167,792 viewer hours from the preceding Wednesday. Some streamers couldn’t engage in the protest, as some have contractual obligations with Twitch or sponsors that require them to stream. Otherwise, the drop could have been higher.

All of this is to say that the protest did make a difference. Today, Twitch has sent an email out to creators noting that it has heard the criticism and that it is working on measures to address hate raids.

Twitch's email to creators following the recent hate-bot attacks pic.twitter.com/cIV8B91hAO

— Catalin Cimpanu (@campuscodi) September 3, 2021

Of course, promises of future support do nothing to help those suffering from the problem right now, and the tools that Twitch offers in the meantime clearly do little to protect its content creators. For many, it’s not enough.

— ?DinomamaUK? -♿️??️‍?? (@DinomamaUK) September 3, 2021

The @Twitch email about hate raids is reactive, not proactive, coming a full two days after the boycott. It once again puts the responsibility on streamers to manage these raids when they happen, with no concrete information on what *they* are doing about it #TwitchDoBetter

— Cobra Cal ? (@callum_morton) September 3, 2021

Hopefully, the real help will be coming soon.

Join AI & Data professionals for 5-days of content and networking.

July 12 - 16, 2021

We may collect cookies and other personal information from your interaction with our website. For more information on the categories of personal information we collect and the purposes we use them for, please view our Notice at Collection.

#ADayOffTwitch Protest Gathered Support From Big Streamers, Made Dent in Twitch Daily Traffic

The Mary Sue 03 September, 2021 - 02:55pm

After months (really years) of marginalized creators calling for Twitch to better protect them from hate raids on stream, streamers and viewers alike began to share disturbing videos showing what it is like to experience these raids. They shared these stories under the hashtag #TwitchDoBetter and encouraged more to do the same.

Many pointed to a spring update on the platform as the source of the increased attacks. Earlier this year, Twitch expanded their tag feature to help communities find each other. Bad actors used that as a way to better target streamers who are people of color, LGBTQ+, disabled, and more. These groups began to experience increased timed raids, in which bots would flood stream chats with hateful words and slurs.

Though Twitch did respond to #TwitchDoBetter, the update resulted in little to no reduction in traffic from hate bots raiding livestreams. So, the creators of that hashtag, RekItRaven, opted for something different.

— Rek It, Raven! ☠ (@RekItRaven) August 20, 2021

Raven, and fellow organizers LuciaEverblack and ShineyPen, called for streamers to boycott Twitch for one day to make their voices heard. They called for streamers and viewers in all communities on the platform to not log on to Twitch on September 1, 2021. With the call to action came a list of demands from Twitch.

Leading up to the day off, there were lots of medium-size to small creators taking part, but the movement was not without its critics. Black music producer and streamer DeTune said this was giving the trolls what they wanted and their time would be better spent livestreaming a protest. He has spoken up about the harassment on Twitch before. DeTune criticized the platform for not limiting the use of the N-word in chat and choosing instead to focus on words that target someone’s sexual activity like “simp” and “virgin.”

While DeTune’s reasons were thought out, others like popular streamer Asmongold opted out for a different reason.

The part where he call people nobodies…

There are well over 20 BIPOC/LGBTQ+ content creators being targeted but the fact he said that shows his true thoughts.

— Candice 🏳️‍🌈(She/Her): Thick Skin Survivor (@MunchkinDoom) August 24, 2021

As a streamer with over 2 million followers and nothing to lose from marginalized creators being raided by bots, he could have voiced support or stayed silent. Instead, he chose to say it was pointless, everyone participating was a nobody, and if some bigger streamers joined, of course he would join. He just refused to be the first one to take the leap and join in on the single-day boycott.

This sort of backfired, because Amsongold’s refusal to join in unless bigger streamers joined first is how this story came across my timeline last week.

When the day came around, it turns out many, many big names were there to call attention to this massive issue on Twitch.

While, in gaming spaces, Kinda Funny Games announced their support ahead of the event, many gaming and tabletop streamers announced their support the day of.

Also, HUGE thanks to @DefinedByKy for helping me understand all of this better and just generally being a fantastic resource/person

— Bruce Greene (@brucegreene) September 1, 2021

Excellent work by @Buffpup_ on Fox 5 New York regarding #ADayOffTwitch pic.twitter.com/to4oQim02S

— FalseEyeD 👾 VTuber (@FalseEyeD) September 2, 2021

One of the biggest streamer on the platform, Auronplay (with over 9 million followers on Twitch), announced that both he and the TortillaLand Minecraft Server would participate in #ADayOffTwitch.

— Auron (@auronplay) September 1, 2021

It wasn’t just Twitch giants in the gaming space that helped lift Raven’s and others’ message. Leftist political commentator Hasan Piker (1.5 million followers on Twitch), who frequently calls attention to unionizing and Twitch owner Amazon’s influence, joined the boycott, as well.

i do #ADayOffTwitch and joe rogan takes horse dewormer

— hasanabi (@hasanthehun) September 1, 2021

Not everyone who wanted to take the day off could. For example, Motherlands RPG posted that they were contractually obligated to go live that day, but supported everyone who joined the boycott. One streamer used that time to create another tool (beyond what Stream Deck offered) to help marginalized streamers address hate raids. This is a Twitch issue not to be put on streamers to fix. However, it is inspiring to see people make these tweaks to the experience.

👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾 https://t.co/s37sK0QyCx

— Black Girl Gamers (@blackgirlgamers) September 2, 2021

The activity and articles prompted Twitter to create a Moment about the trending hashtag. That gave both quick context and showed support garnered by streamers iamBrandon, Will Smith (not to be confused with the actor), and GernanderJake. This is on top of coverage from us, The Verge, PC Gamer, Eurogamer, Kotaku, Wired, NME, Yahoo News, and more.

Early data shows that there was a dip in viewers from the #ADayOffTwitch boycott, but there is not a complete agreement as to how many.

As for the total number of streamers…

— Zach Bussey (@zachbussey) September 1, 2021

Sully Gnome reported that September 1 became the 3rd-lowest daily viewership this year, after New Year’s Day and June 28th (possibly due to the rolling blackouts on that day in the U.S.).

Because August and September tend to dip in numbers due to many students going back to school and university, some may dismiss this as just the streaming cycle. However, this is more than that because numbers reset September 2, and that dip was very sharp and not a lowering slope.

The conservative estimated show a 5.4% difference in traffic, but many estimates are giving 7-12%. This was on the first day of SUBtember (an annual drive to push for paid subscriptions to streamers, in which Twitch takes 50%).

Really, it shouldn’t take a big show of not using the platform to get Twitch’s attention. I say this even though Twitch has not acknowledged #ADayOffTwitch and barely acknowledged #TwitchDoBetter. These callouts will continue by creators like Raven and others who joined (or wanted to but couldn’t) until Twitch makes active changes resembling that list of demands and does right by its most vulnerable creators.

(Feature image: MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images)

TimTheTatman makes waves with first stream on YouTube Gaming | Dot Esports

Dot Esports 03 September, 2021 - 12:50pm

His fans will watch no matter where he goes.

Some might think of TimTheTatman’s move to YouTube Gaming, from Twitch, as a sort of “retirement plan.” But the hefty, tatted-up streamer showed yesterday that where he goes, his fans will follow.

In just his first stream on his new platform yesterday, Tim quickly hit numerous notable benchmarks for viewership and “members” on YouTube Gaming, proving that he’s still a game streaming giant—metaphorically (he’ll have you know he’s been losing weight).

After being live on the platform for about an hour and a half, Tim eclipsed 100,000 viewers for the first time on YouTube Gaming. He peaked at around 118,000 viewers.

Overall, his seven-hour stream averaged about 88,000 viewers on YouTube Gaming with a total of 636,000 hours watched, according to data acquired by Stream Hatchet.

Meanwhile, he quickly racked up paid subscribers, which YouTube Gaming calls “members,” as well. In the first hour of his stream, Tim hit 10,000 members.

The figure, while impressive, is made more notable when you consider the distinct differences between his current and former platform. Unlike Twitch, YouTube doesn’t allow viewers to gift that status to other viewers. On Twitch, top content creators like Tim regularly have viewers who gift large numbers of subscriptions to other fans.

Tim left Twitch with more than 28,000 active subscribers, according to TwitchTracker, and 5,129 of those were gifted subs. 

As of this morning, Tim said during his stream that he had 15,350 active members on YouTube Gaming. He added that he ended his stream with around 14,000 yesterday.

In the past year, Tim recorded more than 60 million hours watched on Twitch, according to stat tracker SullyGnome. He averaged 34,634 viewers with 1,754 hours streamed in that time span.

Prior to announcing his move to YouTube, Tim had 3.78 million subscribers (YouTube’s equivalent of a Twitch “follower”). He has since gained more than 100,000 subs, bumping him up to more than 3.94 million.

The VOD of his first stream on YouTube has nearly two million views less than 24 hours after being posted. It was the No. 1 trending video for gaming on YouTube for most of the day yesterday and it’s currently the second-ranked trending video in the category.

TimTheTatman shares a heartfelt message for Dr Disrespect after leaving Twitch for YouTube Gaming  

Sportskeeda 03 September, 2021 - 11:53am

TimTheTatman was finally reunited with his partner in crime, Dr Disrespect, when he jumped ship to YouTube Gaming.

As expected, the duo took to the streets of Verdansk and were joined by Jack "CouRage" Dunlop and DrLupo.

Just like the good old days, TimTheTatman and Dr Disrespect didn't leave a single opportunity to make the most of the occasion and took jabs at CouRage.

The streamer's departure from Twitch has been the subject of much debate. However, TimTheTatman received immense support from the community and garnered 10,000 followers even before the stream began.

The 31-year-old streamer expressed how it felt to stream with Doc again, which at one point in time looked like a distant dream.

He further went on to reveal his love for streaming with all his friends, but explained how going live with Doc is a tad bit different.

TimTheTatman also stated how Dr Disrespect's quick wit and banter adds to their dynamic, which makes it easier for the two to get along.

Ever since Tim's move, fans have been wondering who could be the next name on the list.

xQc iterated how he signed an exclusive deal with Twitch, but preferred to keep it under wraps. He also revealed how streamers like TimTheTatman and DrLupo are leaving Twitch for YouTube Gaming to make more money.

Be that as it may, NICKMERCS, Asmongold, summit1g, and Indiefoxx have emerged as names who could join the aforementioned streamers on YouTube Gaming.

Asmongold is currently on a week-long hiatus from the Amazon-owned streaming platform. He has expressed his dismay over streaming on Twitch on several occasions.

summit1g, on the flip side, has teased his future at numerous junctures. While this isn't concrete information, the GTA RP streamer and his audience could become great additions to the already elegant looking roster.

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