Update: 4 New COVID-19 Deaths, 20 New Cases In Calaveras, 29 New Cases In Tuolumne

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MyMotherLode.com 12 October, 2021 - 04:51pm 13 views

(Reuters) - The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that warrants further study to corroborate the findings and that have yet to be certified by peer review.

Dangerous blood clots can occur in moderate COVID-19

A European study has found an elevated risk of a life-threatening blood clot called venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients who were not critically ill. The blood clot risk had previously been associated with severe COVID-19. The researchers tracked 2,292 patients who came to hospital emergency rooms with mild or moderate COVID-19 but without VTE. Four weeks later, VTE had developed in roughly 1 of every 200 mildly ill patients who had not been hospitalized and nearly 5 of every 200 moderately ill patients overall, the researchers reported on Friday in Thrombosis Research https://bit.ly/3v4YHUO. They conclude that doctors caring for mildly and moderately ill COVID-19 patients need to be aware of these risks, "especially in patients with moderate COVID-19 requiring hospitalization."

High-dose blood thinners prevent clots in moderate COVID-19

In hospitalized, moderately ill COVID-19 patients who have high levels of the d-dimer protein in their blood - indicating a higher-than-average risk for dangerous blood clots - treatment with high doses of the blood thinner low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) significantly reduced the odds of clot formation and death, according to data from a clinical trial. The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or death was 28.7% in the high-dose group, compared to 41.9% in patients getting a standard dose. After accounting for patients' various risk factors, that was a 32% reduction in risk with high-dose heparin, the researchers said on Monday in a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine https://bit.ly/3lsXPWB. The researchers said they launched the trial "because we saw patients getting blood clots and dying in front of us while on standard doses of preventative heparin," said study leader Dr. Alex Spyropoulos of the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in New York. "We were able to prove ... that d-dimer levels more than four times the upper limit of normal are able to predict a very high-risk group of hospitalized COVID-19 patients - and giving therapeutic doses of heparin in these patients works," Spyropoulos said. "This is practice changing now."

Click for a Reuters graphic https://tmsnrt.rs/3c7R3Bl on vaccines in development.

(Reporting by Nancy Lapid and Megan Brooks; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

As of now, the teacher at the center of the allegations remains publicly unidentified.

Police said the woman traveled to areas where COVID cases rose, and contact tracing has been difficult due to the nature of sex work, according to reports.

Only about a million doses of Moderna's vaccine have gone to low-income countries, compared to 8.4 million doses of Pfizer's vaccine.

The calculations in the study by researchers at The University of Ottawa were used to promote the idea that the COVID-19 vaccine is unsafe for use.

The former head of the Food and Drug Administration said Sunday that the COVID-19 vaccine mandate for children will be a "multiyear effort."

One doctor quoted legendary baseball philosopher Yogi Berra to urge everyone to slow down in the booster shot debate and other open questions.

Doctors performed an emergency C-Section on Kelsie Routs, 23, while she was in a coma. She woke up to find out her baby boy was born a week earlier.

A fifth of all critically ill Covid patients are unvaccinated pregnant women, new data reveal, with health bosses urging them to get their jabs.

How COVID boosters could be deepening vaccine skepticism

NeNe Leakes let the men in her DMs know that although she appreciates them, she's not focused on dating at the moment.

Jason Miller made the claim in an interview with Britain's GB News TV channel.

The lawsuit, which is being funded by a Wisconsin brewery, seeks to force the district to comply with CDC guidelines for COVID-19.

Crowds again broke out in a "F*** Joe Biden" chant over the weekend.

Finding educators to staff Schnell Price Lambert’s child care centers in Milwaukee, Wis., has been so difficult that she’s considering resorting to drastic measures. There’s plenty of demand from families who need child care in Milwaukee — Lambert said she was even offered an opportunity, including financing, to expand — but she doesn’t have enough staff to make it work. About 330 miles southeast in Greenville, Ohio, Kara Allread, the chief administrative officer at Brethren Retirement Community, a nonprofit that works with seniors living in assisted living and nursing home facilities as well as in their own homes, has made tough decisions about how much care she can provide.

Countless sidewalk cafes and street eateries blossomed in the city— as has the pushback from community advocates.

It's unclear how the boy from Plantersville, Texas, survived but aside from being hungry and dehydrated, he was found "in good spirits."

"I can’t say who or he’d kick my a**," the "Dune" actor says of the advice. He also talks about "Wonka" and the film being a "celebration of being off-center."

Jill and Derick Dillard share sons Israel David, 6, and Samuel Scott, 4

One expert said that deepfake and synthetic media technology is a game changer when it comes to disinformation. Especially because of how fast it is evolving.

A California woman with more than $350,000 in student debt served as her own lawyer in personal bankruptcy and saw 98% of her loans discharged in the latest case in a growing trend.

Read full article at MyMotherLode.com

Risk of dangerous blood clots linked to moderate Covid-19

in-cyprus 12 October, 2021 - 10:13pm

I don’t want Chappelle to be canceled. I want him to pull out the threads of homophobia and transphobia that run through the quilt of his otherwise brilliant work.

In middle school, I ran home after class every day out of fear of getting beaten up. The fights started as pranks at my expense and escalated to blows to my head and torso. After the end-of-day bell rang, students came together in a circle to be entertained like the audience at the comedy shows the adults watched. The fists of my harassers were the setup and my face was the bloody punchline. I learned to smile when the gags were verbal, but taking a blow to the mouth made that much harder.

The folks in my neighborhood knew that I was gay before I did. When I realized it, too, I tried to hide it by making myself as small as possible. I was the quiet, bespectacled nerd who knew the answers to questions from the teachers, but not what to say to avoid getting hammered in the hallways. I eventually came out at 15, and I’d love to say that it got better after that. But I just became an even bigger target for mockery by boys who wanted to prove how manly they were.

I emerged from the terror of those years into the world of political activism. My first tentative steps into advocacy in Houston became a confident stride as I organized rallies and marches on behalf of victims of hate crimes. I moved to Washington, D.C., to work with Human Rights Campaign to fight for LGBTQ equality at the federal level. I played a leading role in legalizing marriage equality in D.C. in 2009. I left D.C. to help win the freedom to marry nationwide.

I evolved — and so did the Black community’s opinions of gay and trans people. A majority of people of color now support civil rights for LGBTQ people, including the freedom to marry. But a majority is not everyone. And like some of those same entertainers who filled the heads of my neighbors with stereotypes and hate, newer cultural heroes continue to peddle the same stale jokes, and make LGBTQ people like me the butt of their comedy. When I listen to those comedians today, it induces flashbacks to the fear and trauma I felt as a teenager.

One of the most successful is Dave Chappelle, whose latest Netflix comedy special, “The Closer,” is in the top five most popular programs on Netflix this week. It’s his sixth for the streaming channel. He’s won five Emmy Awards and three Grammys, as well as the prestigious Mark Twain Prize.

In his new show, Chappelle quips that DaBaby, the rapper who recently made homophobic remarks, “punched the LGBTQ community right in the AIDS.” He proudly claimed to be “Team TERF,” aligning himself with Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling and others who deny that trans women are women. In response, Jaclyn Moore, the trans showrunner for Netflix’s “Dear White People,” declared that she wouldn’t work with the company as long as it profits from transphobia. And a trans Netflix employee tweeted that Chappelle “attacks the trans community, and the very validity of transness.” Netflix then suspended the employee.

I was once a fan of the man and his comedy. I was entranced by his searing observations on race, and because of that I overlooked his homophobic comments. I cheered his bravery when he walked away from “Chappelle’s Show” on Comedy Central in 2006, which he later said was partly out of concern that he was perpetuating racial stereotypes rather than satirizing and challenging them after he noticed a staffer laughing at him, not with him. I supported his demands that Netflix remove the same program from its lineup because he didn’t think he was being fairly compensated.

The more I watched Chappelle’s work, however, the more his constant stream of humor hostile to LGBTQ people left a sour taste in my mouth. He often hits the mark on race even as he can’t see the humanity of gay people. Instead of coming up with better jokes that don’t verbally punch queer folks, he leans into the controversy masquerading as a truth-teller. To shield himself, he declared in “The Closer,” “Any of you who have ever watched me know that I have never had a problem with transgender people. If you listen to what I’m saying, clearly, my problem has always been with white people.”

But in fact, Chappelle is playing one targeted community against another. He talks about what he sees as a difference in how America treats Black people and the gay community. “In our country,” he said, “you can shoot and kill” a Black man, “but you better not hurt a gay person’s feelings.” He’s living in a binary where all Blacks are straight and all gays are white and ignoring the existence of people like me who are both. And his comedy means there are crowds just like the students who whooped and hollered as the bullies bashed my face in school now circling to cheer him on.

I don’t want Chappelle to be canceled. I want him to pull out the threads of homophobia and transphobia that run through the quilt of his otherwise brilliant work. His once bracing wit has become calcified like a wasp in resin unable to move and sting with the times. As such, he’s giving narrow-minded people a safe space to deny the existence of trans people and make gays the focus of their taunts. There’s a difference between being the subject of a joke and being the butt of it. Dave Chappelle, who left Comedy Central when the laughing was at him instead of with him, should understand the distinction.

Michael Crawford is a freelance writer focusing on race, identity and culture.

Risk of dangerous blood clots linked to moderate Covid-19: European study

The Straits Times 12 October, 2021 - 10:13pm

LONDON (REUTERS) - A European study has found an elevated risk of a life-threatening blood clot called venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Covid-19 patients who were not critically ill.

The blood clot risk had previously been associated with severe Covid-19. The researchers tracked 2,292 patients who came to hospital emergency rooms with mild or moderate Covid-19 but without VTE.

Four weeks later, VTE had developed in roughly one of every 200 mildly ill patients who had not been hospitalised and nearly five of every 200 moderately ill patients overall, the researchers reported on Friday (Oct 8) in Thrombosis Research.

They conclude that doctors caring for mildly and moderately ill Covid-19 patients need to be aware of these risks, "especially in patients with moderate Covid-19 requiring hospitalisation".

In hospitalised, moderately ill Covid-19 patients who have high levels of the d-dimer protein in their blood - indicating a higher-than-average risk for dangerous blood clots - treatment with high doses of the blood thinner low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) significantly reduced the odds of clot formation and death, according to data from a clinical trial.

The incidence of VTE or death was 28.7 per cent in the high-dose group, compared with 41.9 per cent in patients getting a standard dose.

After accounting for patients' various risk factors, that was a 32 per cent reduction in risk with high-dose heparin, the researchers said on Monday in a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The researchers said they launched the trial "because we saw patients getting blood clots and dying in front of us while on standard doses of preventative heparin," said study leader, Dr Alex Spyropoulos of the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research in New York.

"We were able to prove... that d-dimer levels more than four times the upper limit of normal are able to predict a very high-risk group of hospitalised Covid-19 patients - and giving therapeutic doses of heparin in these patients works," Dr Spyropoulos said.

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