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Motor1 13 August, 2021 - 04:10pm 10 views

Is the Integra coming back?

The Integra — the brand's iconic front-wheel-drive sports coupe — will return next year. It was last sold as the Acura RSX in America and went out of production in 2006. ... The brand says it will be a premium compact, arrive in Spring 2022 and possess "the same fun to drive spirit and DNA of the original." gearpatrol.comOne of the Most Iconic 1990s Sports Cars Is Coming Back

Read full article at Motor1

The Acura Integra is coming back, but what exactly will it be?

Autoblog 15 August, 2021 - 04:20pm

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While we're all excited about its resurrection, Autoblog is not a hive mind, and each of us has a different idea of what a new Integra could (or should) be. Here are our takes, for whatever they're worth, which could easily be absolutely nothing. 

Associate Editor Byron Hurd: Yes, that's a photo of a CR-Z model at Honda's design studio. Bear with me here; I promise I'm going somewhere with this. Frankly, as cool as it would be to see Acura take the fight to the likes of the Audi A3, Mercedes-Benz CLA and BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe, I can't help but look at the (lack of) success of the ILX and wonder whether there's any hope for something so formulaic. 

While I'm sure this will offend at least a few "purists," I'd love to see Honda leverage whatever equity the Integra nameplate has left to pivot its more mainstream cars toward electrification. Sure, an all-wheel-drive take on a Civic Si or Type-R sounds really cool, but how about an accessible fastback coupe or sedan with a scaled-down version of the NSX's powertrain, flipped front-to-back? Base it on a smaller (turbocharged?) ICE, stick the electrified axle in the rear, and voila. Ford has proven that hybrids don't have to be expensive; heck, even the CR-Z was cheap back in the day. 

As bothersome as this idea may seem to the faithful, consider this: The ILX wasn't a bust because it was called "ILX." Small sedans just aren't worthwhile investments for automakers right now, so as abhorrent as hybridization or electrification may seem, the alternative could very well be a subtle crossoverification of the Integra nameplate. Does that sound more appealing? Because I sure don't think so. 

News Editor Joel Stocksdale: So, just as was the case with the Integra and even the ILX, I have no doubt the new Integra will be based on the Honda Civic. And I think that will probably be a very good thing. The new 11th-generation Civic seems to be as good if not better than the outgoing one, so add some nicer interior pieces and some sound-deadening, and it should be a great, roomy entry-level luxury alternative.

But what I'm most excited for is the potential for sporty Type-S iterations. My guess is that it would need to split the difference between the Civic Si and the Civic Type R. The best way to do so would probably be to use the turbo 2.0-liter from the Accord, which makes 252 horsepower, almost perfectly slotting between the likely 200-horsepower Si engine and the 300-horsepower Type R engine. Acura could even go with the TLX version that makes 272 horsepower, but they may want to keep a little space between the two sedans. And the 2.0-liter engine should fit in the chassis just fine, since the Type R engine is a tweaked version of it.

I'd also love to see SH-AWD appear in this hypothetical Integra Type S. It would help further separate it from the Honda version, and it would be a great selling point for a luxury automobile. It would probably be enormously entertaining in such a small, agile package. To have that extra torque-vectored rear push to bend the little Integra around corners sounds like an absolute blast. I would even be fine if it was automatic-only.

Sure this is all speculation, but it's all possible without an outrageous amount of work. Plus, all of this would have real marketability to actual customers, not just cheap-car enthusiasts.

Road Test Editor Zac Palmer: I'm the Integra guy on staff. My first car, which I still own and cherish, is a 2001 Acura Integra GS-R. To say that I'm ecstatic for a new Integra would be an understatement. Acura hasn’t had a small, affordable car directed toward enthusiasts for a long while now (the ILX never did cut it) and that’s exactly what I hope the new Integra ultimately is.

If I can be selfish for a moment, my dream would be for this new Integra to be a three-door hatchback, just like the one sitting in my garage. That may be a sales disaster in the making, but it presses the nostalgia button hard. A four-door sedan would be in keeping with the rest of the luxury compacts out there, but Acura has a chance to set itself apart by making something way more interesting.

I’d also love for there to be a Type S model that is available with a manual transmission. Once again, being selfish, but a Type S with a slick Honda six-speed would be the closest thing to replicating my third-gen GS-R in spirit. The power numbers don’t need to be ludicrously high. Somewhere just under 300 horsepower feels about right (260-280), considering the new Civic Type R is probably going to come in with a few horses more than its current 306 horsepower rating. And while SH-AWD (or a hybrid helper as Byron suggests) would be a neat twist, I’d actually prefer if Acura kept it to just front-wheel drive to keep the weight and cost down. Plus, Honda has proven with the Type R it knows how to make front-wheel-drive cars that are just as fun to drive as all-wheel-drive models.

Acura already revealed one retro touch with the “Integra” name stamped into the front bumper, and if that continues elsewhere throughout the car’s design, I’d love it even more. Assuming that Acura comes through and sets this Integra onto the market with the enthusiast in mind, and it follows the trend of other new Acuras that are exceedingly good to drive, I’m afraid that I’m going to want one to park next to my Taffeta White 2001 example.

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We Can Only Hope the 2023 Acura Integra Is as Rad as These Renders

Motor Trend 15 August, 2021 - 04:20pm

© 2021 MotorTrend | MOTOR TREND GROUP, LLC.

592bhp Honda NSX Type S revealed as swansong for Japanese mid-engine supercar

CarWale 15 August, 2021 - 04:20pm

In "Our Lives Together," I spotlight some of the more interesting examples of shared comic book universes. You know, crossovers that aren't exactly crossovers.

Today's example is a bit different because it is based around a LEGIT crossover as opposed to the sort of quasi-crossover, but I think it still sort of works because the shared continuity of this story goes beyond simply this two-part story itself, as it is based on years of earlier stories and the sheer embrace of the DC Universe as a shared universe, something that was a relatively modern concept (really only since the late 1960s).

When Crisis on Infinite Earths happened, things were not fully planned all the way for what the continuity of the DC Universe would look like Post-Crisis, but there was a good deal more planning than, say, the continuity of the New 52, so there was still a high level of interconnectivity through a number of DC titles Post-Crisis, and this allowed Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis to plan an extremely detailed crossover with John Ostrander between Justice League International and the Suicide Squad.

The inciting event of the crossover was the Soviets going public with the fact that they had Tom Tresser, the superhero known as Nemesis, in custody in Justice League International #13. He was a part of the Suicide Squad and had been captured while on a mission. Batman had previously teamed up with Nemesis from his Brave and the Bold days (Nemesis had his own back-up series in that series) and so Batman respected him and wanted to free him. Batman goes to Soviet teammate, Rocket Red, for help...

Batman, of course, insists on getting to see Nemesis once they are there, which Dmitri arranges (because he's a good guy, if Batman would just trust him) and they discover Nemesis beaten and Batman is such a jerk about it. The moment he calls Dmitri dumb is roooooough...

As I just noted earlier today, just three issues earlier, Rick Flag had been disgusted to have to try to apprehend Batman, as he respects the superhero so much. So here, he was glad to see that he and Batman were both there to spring Nemesis, but now, seeing Flag, Batman decides that Nemesis ISN'T worth saving if he is working with the Squad. It is ROUGH. Flag can't handle it (to put it into context, in just the last few months, Flag was betrayed by his former girlfriend and then saw her sacrifice herself to atone for her betrayal, went on a mission where he was the only survivor and then was forced to fight against Batman against his wishes and now Batman is treating him like he's trash? It's TOO MUCH) and attacks Batman...

Really, Ostrander handles the shared continuity beautifully. Captain Atom and Nightshade were dating each other in Captain Atom's comic book series, where Nightshade was his CIA liaison, a role she took in the Suicide Squad, as well, but as part of his cover, they can't know each other publicly, so they "fight" each other while really just having a tickle fight. Early on, Batman has an excellent moment where he dismisses Deadshot right away by telling him not to bother if he is just going to pull his shots again.

Duchess, who is a Female Fury who has amnesia, instantly recognizes Mister Miracle, but neither of the two understand WHY she knows him.

After a frank discussion in his cell, where he is forced to question his political beliefs a little bit, Dmitri ultimately decides to free Nemesis, as he fears that Nemesis will be murdered if they leave him there...

The Justice League uses their then-new International status to take control of Nemesis and all of the Russian superheroes who arrived to play a role in the scenario find themselves unable to stop the League because of their various political agreements with the United Nations. Nemesis is free.

This was such a brilliantly detailed and nuanced character-based story arc. Wow.

Okay, folks, if you have a suggestion for another interesting piece of shared continuity, drop me a line at brianc@cbr.com!

The Acura Integra Is Coming Back and “Will Live Up to the Hype”

Motor Trend 13 August, 2021 - 01:14am

Acura is tired of being asked when it will bring back the Integra sport compact, which hasn't been sold here since 2001. The answer, announced during Monterey Car Week and the festivities leading up to the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance: The Acura Integra, one of the two cars that helped launch the Acura brand back in 1986, is making a huge comeback in 2022. It will very likely debut as a 2023 model.

Honda's luxury brand used drones to break the news in the night sky over Pebble Beach. The lights of the drone depicted what appears to be a compact two-door hatch, though with its boxy profile and pop-up headlights, we think this was more of a stylized homage to the original '80s Integra two-door (a four-door was also offered during the Integra's near-20-year run).

A teaser image and video (at the top of this story and above) show a more modern Acura visage with pointy headlights and the brand's signature pentagonal grille. We particularly dig the '90s-retro "INTEGRA" lettering debossed in the bumper cover just beneath the headlight—it's a sweet touch.

MotorTrend tried to get more information from Acura brand officer Jon Ikeda, who was the one who confirmed that the automaker is tired of people asking for the Integra's return and elaborated on how it decided to make the new Integra happen.

Actually, the decision to bring the Integra was made about six years ago, Ikeda confesses. He would not say what platform it uses, where it will be built, or much other detail. But it is expected to be electrified to some extent—that is the future of Acura. It will likely be a hybrid as opposed to a pure EV. And it will be fun to drive, which would be appropriate, given the Integra's historical DNA.

Oh, and while the original Integra was not all-wheel drive—it was instead a very smart-handling front-driver—we expect the 2022 Integra to be AWD. We assume that, like previous Integras, the new one will be a compact, sporty vehicle; possibly it will be a coupe, though we're purely speculating at this point.

The right time to bring it back is now, Ikeda says, as Acura works to return to its roots as a performance brand and has been expanding its Type S offerings (TLX, MDX, and now the NSX). And there will be a hole in the halo category with the 2022 NSX Type S capping the current NSX sports car's run as the brand's performance north star. After the Type S, no more NSX.

Brand aficionados specifically and car enthusiasts generally remember Integra and there are good feelings behind it, Ikeda says. The new Integra should bring people into the brand, both new customers, and the nostalgic. "It will live up to the hype," Ikeda notes.

The new Integra is not a replacement for the Acura ILX compact sedan—which departs after the '22 model year—the brand chief says. But it is an addition to the existing lineup that does seem to fill the segment gap with a much more exciting entrant. That means there's still a slot available for a small sedan, although no word as of yet whether Acura will fill it once the ILX dies.

© 2021 MotorTrend | MOTOR TREND GROUP, LLC.

The Acura Integra Is Coming Back and “Will Live Up to the Hype”

TFLcar.com 13 August, 2021 - 01:14am

Acura is tired of being asked when it will bring back the Integra sport compact, which hasn't been sold here since 2001. The answer, announced during Monterey Car Week and the festivities leading up to the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance: The Acura Integra, one of the two cars that helped launch the Acura brand back in 1986, is making a huge comeback in 2022. It will very likely debut as a 2023 model.

Honda's luxury brand used drones to break the news in the night sky over Pebble Beach. The lights of the drone depicted what appears to be a compact two-door hatch, though with its boxy profile and pop-up headlights, we think this was more of a stylized homage to the original '80s Integra two-door (a four-door was also offered during the Integra's near-20-year run).

A teaser image and video (at the top of this story and above) show a more modern Acura visage with pointy headlights and the brand's signature pentagonal grille. We particularly dig the '90s-retro "INTEGRA" lettering debossed in the bumper cover just beneath the headlight—it's a sweet touch.

MotorTrend tried to get more information from Acura brand officer Jon Ikeda, who was the one who confirmed that the automaker is tired of people asking for the Integra's return and elaborated on how it decided to make the new Integra happen.

Actually, the decision to bring the Integra was made about six years ago, Ikeda confesses. He would not say what platform it uses, where it will be built, or much other detail. But it is expected to be electrified to some extent—that is the future of Acura. It will likely be a hybrid as opposed to a pure EV. And it will be fun to drive, which would be appropriate, given the Integra's historical DNA.

Oh, and while the original Integra was not all-wheel drive—it was instead a very smart-handling front-driver—we expect the 2022 Integra to be AWD. We assume that, like previous Integras, the new one will be a compact, sporty vehicle; possibly it will be a coupe, though we're purely speculating at this point.

The right time to bring it back is now, Ikeda says, as Acura works to return to its roots as a performance brand and has been expanding its Type S offerings (TLX, MDX, and now the NSX). And there will be a hole in the halo category with the 2022 NSX Type S capping the current NSX sports car's run as the brand's performance north star. After the Type S, no more NSX.

Brand aficionados specifically and car enthusiasts generally remember Integra and there are good feelings behind it, Ikeda says. The new Integra should bring people into the brand, both new customers, and the nostalgic. "It will live up to the hype," Ikeda notes.

The new Integra is not a replacement for the Acura ILX compact sedan—which departs after the '22 model year—the brand chief says. But it is an addition to the existing lineup that does seem to fill the segment gap with a much more exciting entrant. That means there's still a slot available for a small sedan, although no word as of yet whether Acura will fill it once the ILX dies.

© 2021 MotorTrend | MOTOR TREND GROUP, LLC.

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