Watching the Skies: First of 3 big, bright supermoons arrives

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WOODTV.com 26 April, 2021 - 02:42pm 26 views

What is a geomagnetic storm?

A geomagnetic storm is a major disturbance of Earth's magnetosphere that occurs when there is a very efficient exchange of energy from the solar wind into the space environment surrounding Earth. noaa.govGeomagnetic Storms | NOAA / NWS Space Weather Prediction Center

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — The first of three consecutive supermoons will light up the night sky early this week. 

A full moon is considered “super” when it’s closest to the earth in its orbit. Supermoons usually look a little bigger and brighter, but the difference is subtle. 

The full moon on April 26 will be the second closest full moon of the year. It will officially be full at 11:31 p.m. but will still look full for the next couple of nights. 

There are a few names for the April full moon including the Pink Moon, the Sugar Making Moon, the Fish Moon and the Egg Moon. 

Dave Kuipers snapped a picture of the waxing moon in the days leading up to the full moon. This view was captured in Gowen. 

It was a big week for space exploration. NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover landed on the red planet in February, and the helicopter that was onboard the rover had a successful first flight last week.

The Ingenuity Mars helicopter reached an altitude of 10 feet with the first flight, and it hovered off the ground for about 30 seconds. It has since had another flight. 

Four astronauts were sent to the International Space Station last week on a Falcon 9 rocket launched by SpaceX, and the pictures snapped at takeoff were incredible. The astronauts safely made it to the International Space Station early Saturday morning. 

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — There are several opportunities to view meteor showers during the summer and fall months.

Once the new year begins, however, there are several months with no meteor showers to look forward to at all. 

The new moon happened Sunday and it will still not be visible Monday. By Tuesday, those with great eyesight may be able to pick out the thin, waxing moon low on the horizon in the west. Binoculars will help you spot it. 

The waning moon will move by Jupiter and Saturn. Look to the southeast before sunrise to see the three. The moon was to the right of Saturn Monday and will be below Saturn Tuesday. Wednesday, you can look just above the moon to find Jupiter. The moon will be to the lower left of the two planets by Thursday morning.

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NASA: Earth currently under Geomagnetic Storm Watch

WJW FOX 8 News Cleveland 26 April, 2021 - 08:00pm

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Planet Earth is under a Geomagnetic Storm Watch on Sunday and, luckily, that isn’t as scary as it sounds.

In fact, some people in these situations pack up and hop on a plane — not to flee to safety, but to view the beautiful result: auroras or the Northern Lights.

It all starts with a solar flare on the surface of the sun. According to NASA, solar flares are a sudden explosion of energy as a result of crossing or reorganizing magnetic field lines near sunspots. Just like we have different conditions in our atmosphere from day to day, so does the sun. Solar activity, like flares, are not uncommon, but some periods of time are far more active than others. The intensity and size of each flare also varies.

When the sun ejects energy in the form of a solar flare, that radiation travels through space and can impact Earth, which is why we monitor it. Radiation can sometimes interfere with radio communications.

When monitoring solar activity, scientists watch for a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) which is a giant bubble of radiation exploding into space at a fast speed. CMEs sometime happen with a solar flare when the sun’s magnetic fields reorganize.

When the giant bubbles of radiation make it to the Earth’s atmosphere, they can trigger intense light shows in the sky, called auroras. A common name for them is also the Northern Lights.

Conversely, in a worst case scenario, the radiation can cause electricity and power outages.

Scientists recorded a partial halo CME and determined based on it’s size and intensity, that Earth will experience geomagnetic storm conditions early to mid-day Sunday. They expect G2, or moderate storm levels, and it’s predicted to cause hours of brilliant aurora.

G2 storm conditions can trigger voltage alarms in power systems that are highest above sea level. Similar areas may see damage to transformers during geomagnetic storms that are prolonged in duration.

NASA predicts that we will most likely not see any disruptions as a result of this CME, but they do predict brilliant aurora, venturing as far south as the northern edge of the U.S.

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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WJW) - Many areas overnight saw up to 4 inches of snow in Northeast Ohio.

A meteor shot across the sky and stole the show around 10 p.m. Residents along the state's Atlantic Coast from Jacksonville Beach and down as far south as Miami took to Twitter to share videos of the sight.

According to the Old Farmer's Almanac, the Pink Moon rises on the night of Monday, April 26. It is the first supermoon of 2021.

Earth under Geomagnetic Storm Watch on Sunday

WGHP FOX 8 Greensboro 26 April, 2021 - 08:00pm

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — Planet Earth is under a Geomagnetic Storm Watch on Sunday and, luckily, that isn’t as scary as it sounds.

In fact, some people in these situations pack up and hop on a plane — not to flee to safety, but to view the beautiful result: auroras, or the Northern Lights.

It all starts with a solar flare on the surface of the sun. According to NASA, solar flares are a sudden explosion of energy as a result of crossing or reorganizing magnetic field lines near sunspots. Just like we have different conditions in our atmosphere from day to day, so does the sun. Solar activity, like flares, are not uncommon, but some periods of time are far more active than others. The intensity and size of each flare also varies.

When the sun ejects energy in the form of a solar flare, that radiation travels through space and can impact Earth, which is why we monitor it. Radiation can sometimes interfere with radio communications.

When monitoring solar activity, scientists watch for a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) which is a giant bubble of radiation exploding into space at a fast speed. CMEs sometime happen with a solar flare when the sun’s magnetic fields reorganize.

When the giant bubbles of radiation make it to the Earth’s atmosphere, they can trigger intense light shows in the sky, called auroras. A common name for them is also the Northern Lights.

Conversely, in a worst case scenario, the radiation can cause electricity and power outages.

Scientists recorded a partial halo CME and determined based on it’s size and intensity, that Earth will experience geomagnetic storm conditions early to mid-day Sunday. They expect G2, or moderate storm levels, and it’s predicted to cause hours of brilliant aurora.

G2 storm conditions can trigger voltage alarms in power systems that are highest above sea level. Similar areas may see damage to transformers during geomagnetic storms that are prolonged in duration.

NASA predicts that we will most likely not see any disruptions as a result of this CME, but they do predict brilliant aurora, venturing as far south as the northern edge of the U.S.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

More than a year after the EU restricted travel to the region to a bare minimum in a bid to contain the pandemic, the European Commission said it would make a recommendation to member states to allow American travelers back.

Officers responded to a report of a child seriously injured in the 4400 block of Lead Mine Road around 4:30 a.m.

Pfizer said it has not observed a higher rate of the condition than would normally be expected in the general population.

Geomagnetic Storm WATCH Upgraded to Warning

Weatherboy 26 April, 2021 - 08:00pm

Weatherboy Weather News, Maps, RADAR, Satellite, and Forecasts.

The National Weather Service’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has upgraded the Geomagnetic Storm Watch that was in effect for today to a Geomagnetic Storm Warning after  detecting the early arrival of a hearty solar wind.

The SWPC says minor to moderate geomagnetic storm levels are being observed which shows the  early arrival of an anticipated coronal mass ejection that left the Sun on April 22.  The enhancement in solar wind parameters were first observed by the DSCOVR spacecraft.

According to the SWPC, a partial halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) was associated with a C3 flare from Region 2816 on the Sun. After a thorough analysis by SWPC forecasters and computer forecast models that have skill in these types of events, the initial forecast called for impacts to arrive on Earth early to mid-day on today. Instead, however, energy was detected arriving Saturday.

Beyond this pulse of energy that is interacting with the Earth’s magnetic field now,  it appears a solar tsunami was unleashed from the surface of the sun too by this CME.

A solar tsunami, also known as a Moreton Wave or a Moreton-Ramsey Wave, is the signature of a large-scale solar corona shock wave generated by solar flares.  Initially spotted in the late 1950’s, technology deployed by NASA in 2009 confirmed the presence and the mechanics of such a tsunami.

Unlike a wave of water in the sense of a traditional tsunami, a solar tsunami is a wave of hot plasma and magnetism   roughly 62,000 miles tall which races through the solar system at speeds of around 560,000 mph.

While typically known for their weather forecasts, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its National Weather Service (NWS) is also responsible for “space weather.” While there are private companies and other agencies that monitor and forecast space weather, the official source for alerts and warnings of the space environment is the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). The SWPC is located in Boulder, Colorado and is a service center of the NWS, which is part of NOAA. The Space Weather Prediction Center is also one of nine National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) as they monitor current space weather activity 24/7, 365 days a year.

Earth in Geomagnetic Storm Watch, NASA Says Occurrence Not Terrifying as It Sounds

Science Times 26 April, 2021 - 08:00pm

In fact, a Fox 8 report said that some people in these circumstances pack up ride on a plane, but not to safely flee. Rather, they hop on a plane to view what they're expecting as the beautiful result, specifically, auroras or the Northern Lights.

It all begins with a solar burst on the sun's surface, according to NASA, solar flares are abrupt outbursts of energy as an outcome of reorganizing or crossing magnetic field lines close to sunspots.

Just like this earth having different conditions in the atmosphere from day to day, the sun goes through the same thing.

Solar activity, similar to flares are not extraordinary although some periods of time are far more active compared to others. Both the intensity and size of every flare differs as well.

When the sun expels energy in the form of a solar flare, that particular radiation moves through space and can affect Earth, which is it is being monitored. Essentially, radiation can at times interfere with communications.

When watching solar activity, scientists are watching for a CME or Coronal Mass Ejection, which according to the Space Weather Prediction Center, is a gigantic bubble of radiation erupting into space at such a fast speed.

Sometimes, CMEs occur with a solar flare when the magnetic fields of the sun are reorganizing. When the gigantic bubbles of radiation are making it to the atmosphere of Earth, they can stimulate strong light shows in the sky, also known as auroras. A typical name for them is also called the Northern lights.

In a worst case scenario, the radiation can lead to power and electricity outage. Scientists were able to record a fractional halo CME and determined according to its intensity and size that Earth is likely to experience geomagnetic storm circumstances early to middle of Sunday.

They are expecting G2 or moderate levels of storm, and it is forecasted to result in hours of brilliant aurora. Essentially, G2 storm conditions can stimulate voltage alarms in power systems that the said report specified are "highest above sea level."

The same areas may see damage to transformers during geomagnetic storms that are extended in duration. According to NASA's prediction, that will most likely not see any disruptions as an outcome of this CME. However, they do forecast brilliant aurora, venturing as far south as the United States' northern edge.

The National Weather Service describes the Northern Lights also known as the Aurora Borealis, as the result of interactions between the outer atmosphere of Earth and the Sun.

According to Geology.com, the Aurora Autralis is the southern hemisphere matching part to the Northern Lights.

Essentially, the Sun releases electrically charged particles also known as ions, which congruently deviate from the sun in a stream of plasma or ionized gas, identified as the solar wind.

As the plasma comes in contact with the magnetic field of the Earth, the ions sill be disconcerted into moving around this planet.

Some of the ions become stuck and will resultantly interact with the ionosphere of Earth, an average of 60 to 80 miles on top of the surface, causing the ions to glow.

This is the same principle as the manner a neon sign is lighting up. As electrons are passing through the neon tubing, they glow, therefore generating the light in a neon sign.

The aurora constantly change and move in streams of light or curtains, as the process of how the ionized gas of the Sun interacts with the magnetic field of the Earth is quite dynamic.

Lastly, even though not dangerous to life on Earth, the Aurora can result in power disruptions in radio or TV broadcasts and satellite communications.

A similar report is shown on nemesis maturity's YouTube video below:

RELATED ARTICLE: Aurora Borealis May Have Contributed to Sinking of Titanic, Suggests Meteorological Researcher

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