What would happen if the moon were twice as close to Earth?

Science

Livescience.com 18 July, 2021 - 06:00am 75 views

While the film is obviously fantastical, it does raise a question: What would happen if the moon were twice as close to Earth than it is today?

But higher ocean tides wouldn't be the only result of a closer moon. The moon also has a tidal effect on Earth's land, Comins said.

If the moon were suddenly twice as close to Earth, the effect would be like hitting a gong with a mallet, Comins said: Waves of energy would reverberate through the planet due to the sudden increased strength of the moon's gravitational pull. 

And what if the moon were to slowly spiral toward Earth, rather than just moving suddenly? The planet's crust and tides would shift more gradually, hopefully letting life adjust, Scarlett said. The longer days and nights could change our climate and drive evolutionary changes in multiple ways, Scarlett said. Animals would have to adapt to a brighter moon at night. For example, prey might have to learn how to hide better at night, as predators might have more light when hunting. 

While a superpower-bestowing Morgan Freeman won't be the cause of an Earth-moon shake-up, could anything natural cause the moon to drift closer to Earth? 

How many humans could the moon support?

How much trash is on the moon?

How long would it take to walk around the moon?

This is wild speculation of course, but Comins decided on an answer: "If a sufficiently massive object passed close to the Earth-moon system, and the moon was in the right place of its orbit as this thing went by, this thing could potentially take energy from the moon, and that would cause it to spiral in closer to us," Comins said.

So it would take a massive asteroid whizzing by Earth at the exact right place at the exact right time to possibly push the moon toward us like a ball circling a drain. Of course, even if that did happen, it would still take many, many years for the moon to get half the distance away as it is now, so Earth wouldn't feel the effects right away. 

Thank you for signing up to Live Science. You will receive a verification email shortly.

There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.

© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

Read full article at Livescience.com

Living on Earth while your dad walks on the moon

CNN 18 July, 2021 - 09:00am

Updated 11:00 AM ET, Sat July 17, 2021

A version of this story appeared in CNN's Wonder Theory newsletter. To get it in your inbox, sign up for free here. Tell us what you'd like to see more of in the newsletter at sciencenewsletter@cnn.com.

Moon's 'wobble' to amplify coastal flooding due to climate change, says NASA

MSN Canada 18 July, 2021 - 09:00am

On GPS: The man behind Nixon

On GPS: Rupert Murdoch's social circle

What's fanning the wildfires in US states?

The mission to boost COVID-19 vaccine rates among younger Canadians

Nova Scotia heads to the polls for Canada's latest pandemic election

More than 60 people sickened by 'chemical incident' at Texas water park

Thousands of Cubans continue to take to streets to push for global action

Experts say timing of N.S. election will impact voter engagement

Nova Scotia heading to the polls this summer

Ranchers call for federal help amid ongoing drought

Ready to vacation again? This TikTok travel guru has tips

DeSantis PAC selling 'don't Fauci my Florida' merch. Hear Fauci's reaction

Provincial vote in Nova Scotia called for Aug. 17

Mayor of 100 Mile House, B.C., says community is 'on edge' but prepared

Condo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapse

Coastal communities are already dealing with higher tides due to sea level rise from climate change. Still, a new study says that — under the influence of the Moon's gravitational pull — this will get much worse by the mid-2030s.

The Moon is closely linked to Earth's tides. As it orbits around our planet, the Moon's gravitational pull tugs on the world's oceans, resulting in a bulge of water drawn towards the Moon. A similar bulge is pushed away from it on the opposite side of Earth. How close the Moon is to Earth in its elliptical orbit affects the depth of the bulge, such that it is deeper when we have a supermoon. Tides also tend to be higher around the Full and New Moons, when the Earth, Moon, and Sun line up in 'syzygy' — the straight-line configuration of three celestial bodies.

Coastal communities were built with these tides in mind. However, with sea levels rising due to climate change, high tides are reaching new heights, and high-tide flooding is now more common. Cities such as Miami, Florida, are already experiencing regular high-tide floods, also called nuisance floods.

In a new study, the NASA Sea Level Change Science Team at the University of Hawai'i highlights another way the Moon plays a role in our tides. The precession or 'wobble' of its orbital tilt both suppresses and amplifies the tidal bulge in a recurring cycle. Their research reveals that this influence is expected to make high-tide flooding due to climate change even worse starting around the mid-2030s.

"We expect the most rapid increases to be along U.S. Pacific and Gulf of Mexico coastlines, which includes Hawai'i and other Pacific Islands," lead author Phil Thompson, Director of the University of Hawai'i Sea Level Center, said in a press release. "This is important because this is the point at which high-tide flooding transitions from being primarily a local or regional issue and becomes a national issue affecting a majority of our nation's coastlines."

The Moon's orbit around Earth is tilted by roughly 5 degrees compared to the ecliptic — the disk in space that all the major planets trace out as they orbit around the Sun. Due to this tilt, the Moon spends about half its time above the ecliptic and the rest below it. The two points in its orbit where the Moon crosses the ecliptic are called nodes. The position of these nodes changes with time so that the Moon's orbit appears to wobble in space, and it takes 18.6 years for it to complete one entire cycle of this wobble. We've known about this cycle — called lunar nodal precession — for nearly 300 years. Still, its impending effects on us are something entirely new.

In addition to all the other ways the Moon affects the tides, this orbital tilt has an impact of its own. During part of the 18.6-year wobble, tidal extremes are suppressed, resulting in lower high tides and higher low tides. In other parts of the cycle, the extremes are enhanced, producing even higher high tides and lower low tides.

According to NASA, we are currently in a period where the orientation of the wobble is enhancing tidal extremes.

While this is regularly causing high tides to exceed flood thresholds, sea level rise is only adding a small amount. After another 10–15 years of further sea level rise due to climate change, however, the next period of tidal amplification by the lunar cycle is expected to be much worse.

"It will be a different story the next time the cycle comes around to amplify tides again, in the mid-2030s," says NASA. "Global sea level rise will have been at work for another decade. The higher seas, amplified by the lunar cycle, will cause a leap in flood numbers on almost all U.S. mainland coastlines, Hawai'i, and Guam."

This amplification will also increase the impact of storm surge.

As is often the case when it comes to climate change, borders will not protect anyone. These amplified tides will also impact Canadian coastlines and coastal communities. However, according to NASA, far northern coastlines — in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic — will likely see a delayed impact, as the land in those regions is currently rising due to long-term geological processes.

"Scientists, engineers and decision-makers are accustomed to thinking about rare high-impact events, for example, a 100-year storm, but we demonstrate that it is important to plan for extreme months or seasons during which the number of flooding episodes, rather than the magnitude, is exceptional," Thompson said.

"It's the accumulated effect over time that will have an impact," Thompson added in the NASA press release. "[I]f it floods 10 or 15 times a month, a business can't keep operating with its parking lot under water. People lose their jobs because they can't get to work. Seeping cesspools become a public health issue."

With the results of this study in hand, we now have a clearer picture of the flooding risks our coastal communities will be dealing with in the decade to come. While we cannot do anything to influence the Moon's orbit, this kind of research helps us in two ways.

First, it provides urban planners with the information they need to help their communities to adapt to the coming tides. Second, it also highlights how more rapid and effective action on climate change can reduce the worst of the impacts to come.

Like us on Facebook to see similar stories

Please give an overall site rating:

'Eye-opening' NASA study warns 'moon wobbling' could make climate change worse

Newshub 18 July, 2021 - 09:00am

Video: Older New Zealanders increasingly concerned about climate change - study. Credits: Video - Newshub; Image - Getty Images

A new NASA study says coastal flooding is a far more urgent problem than previously thought. Cities along coasts should expect a "surge" of flooding as soon as the next decade, the study says.

The dramatic prediction pushes the previous deadline for disastrous coastal flooding forward by about 70 years.

According to NASA, the cause is a perfect storm of global warming and the effect of regular lunar cycles. Of particular note is a dynamic called 'moon wobbling'.

"In the background, we have long term sea level rise associated with global warming. It's causing sea level to increase everywhere," Ben Hamlington, NASA team lead, told Reuters. 

"But when we look at the other factors causing sea level to change, we focused in on one in particular. So what we call 'the nodal cycle', associated with basically the orientation, the relation of the moon relative to Earth. 

"And what happens is that there's this very long period signal, roughly 20 years, and this effect from the moon causes the tides to vary. So what we found is that this effect lines up with the underlying sea level rise, and that will cause flooding specifically in that time period from 2030 to 2040."

"This is eye-opening for a lot of people," Hamlington said. "It's really critical information for planners. And I think there's a great amount of interest in trying to get this information from science and scientists into the hands of planners."

So what can be done? For starters, city planners should plan accordingly in their construction projects, Hamlington said.

"A building or particular piece of infrastructure, you may want to be there for a very long amount of time, whereas something else you may just want to protect or have access to for a few years," he said.

The study, 'Rapid increases and extreme months in projections of United States high-tide flooding' was published in the Nature Climate Change Journal. It was led by members of the NASA Sea Level Change Science Team. The study focused on US coasts but was applicable to the whole world, NASA said.

The NASA study echoes other dire predictions about coastal sea levels.

A study in the journal Nature Communications found that tropical nations in particular will be vulnerable to coastal inundation, in new research that more than doubled the number of people estimated to be impacted.

Using land elevation data gathered by laser pulses beamed by satellite to Earth, scientists identified coastal areas low enough to make them vulnerable to a one-meter rise in sea level - a level the world is on track to see by 2100. Higher water levels will likely lead to more damage and disruption from flooding and storm surges.

The team found that 62 percent of these low-lying areas were located in the tropics, with a third of the total in Asia.

NASA Warns: 'Wobbling' Moon To Exacerbate Devastating Worldwide Flooding - Greek City Times

GreekCityTimes.com 17 July, 2021 - 07:38pm

The report, produced by the NASA Sea Level Change Team at the University of Hawaii and published in the Nature Climate Change journal, predicts a potential rapid increase in the frequency of flooding at high tide along coastal regions.

The study by NASA says that the lunar cycle combined with rising sea levels is set to drive major tidal flooding events.

The report cites the “wobble” of the Moon’s orbit as a contributing factor in potential disastrous flooding.

This wobble, which happens every 18.6 years, causes extremely high and low tides. For half of that time, regular tides on Earth are suppressed, meaning high tides are lower than normal and low tides are higher than normal.

NASA also details an increase in the global sea level as the other attributing factor to the floods which are predicted to sweep the earth in about 15 years’ time.

According to the study, the number of floods could quadruple as the gravitational effects of the lunar cycle combine with climate change to produce “a decade of dramatic increases” in water disasters.

Coastal cities would experience rapidly increasing high-tide floods lasting a month or longer.

“The combination of the moon’s gravitational pull, rising sea levels, and climate change will continue to exacerbate coastal flooding on our coastlines and across the world,” says Bill Nelson, head of the space agency.

“What’s new is how one of the wobble’s effects on the moon’s gravitational pull – the main cause of Earth’s tides – will combine with rising sea levels resulting from the planet’s warming.”

The next ‘lunar assist’ to high tides will be around mid-2030, by which time global sea levels will have been rising for another decade.

“By that time it will have passed a “tipping point” and the result will be a leap in flood numbers on almost all US mainland coastlines.

“Low-lying areas near sea level are increasingly at risk and suffering due to increased flooding,” says Nelson.

According to the UN and numerous reports such as published in Nature Communications Journal, by 2050 coastal cities will see hundreds of millions of people at risk from floods made worse by rising seas..

Study co-author and NASA Sea Level Change Team Leader Ben Hamlington, said that urban planners should prepare for the increase in high-tide floods and extreme weather events and that flooding is more likely because the factors that are making it happen now will only be worse in the future.

According to NASA’s research, floods will occur in clusters lasting a month or longer, depending on the positions of the Moon, Earth, and the Sun.

NASA says that the study is the first to take into account all known oceanic and astronomical causes for floods.

Professor Mark Howden, Director of the Institute for Climate, Energy & Disaster Solutions at The Australian National University, further explains the lunar phenomenon responsible, known as the Moon’s “nodal cycle”.

“The orbit of the Moon apparently changes from the perspective of Earth,” Professor Howden says.

“Sometimes it’s tilted up one way and sometimes it’s tilted the other way.”

Professor Howden explains that during the amplified part of the cycle, “the Moon lines up with the Sun in terms of gravity” — with the combined effect increasing the height of high tides.

“Those cycles of the Moon have happened for probably billions of years, so they’re just part of the background world we inherit,” he said.

“The problem here is that we’re changing the sea level very quickly, so it’s going up at a record rate at the moment, and what used to be a relatively benign cyclical effect is now a ramping up effect.

“In Florida, they get what they call ‘sunny day flood events’ — it’s a day when there isn’t a storm pushing waves onto the shore, it’s simply that there’s a high tide.”

Scientists explain that although the Moon is currently in a tide-amplifying part of its cycle, the effects are not as environmentally significant as they will be next time around as sea levels continue to rise.

Copyright 2021 Greek City Times

As sea levels rise, B.C. coastal cities could face flooding from moon's 'wobble'

Yahoo News Canada 17 July, 2021 - 06:00am

What some are calling a "moon wobble" means that B.C.'s coastal communities already bracing for flooding from rising sea levels may also have to contend with an added phenomenon.

"Nothing about the moon is changing, this is a totally predictable effect," explained Jess McIver, an assistant professor of astronomy at UBC. "It's been wobbling in this way for millions and millions of years.

"Very, very slowly the axis the moon is orbiting the Earth around is kind of shifting ... and the tides are going to respond."

The issue came to the fore after the release of a new NASA study, published in Nature Climate Change journal earlier this month, "Rapid increases and extreme months in projections of United States high-tide flooding."

Although the study only examines impacts on U.S. coastal communities, the same effects would apply to cities in B.C. as well as other coastal areas in Canada, explained McIver. She added that the effects of moon wobble would vary by location.

She said she hopes further studies can specifically examine how the phenomenon, known formally as a "precession effect" of the lunar cycle, could impact Canadian tides.

The effect will not become significant until the 2030s, according to NASA, but that's exactly when rising sea levels are forecast to worsen.

Cities on B.C.'s coast have already begun preparing for rising sea levels, flooding and extreme tides, in addition to the other climate and weather extremes predicted by climate scientists.

And although they have long known oceans will likely encroach on some urban areas, the addition of the lunar "wobble" at almost exactly the same time could amplify the impact.

"We're going to have this overlap between this very predicted steady creep up in sea level," McIver said. "And when you combine that with this normal 19-year cadence, all of a sudden we're going to reach a point where we start seeing this flooding a lot more often."

The new study is yet another warning to low-lying cities such as Richmond, Delta, Victoria and many First Nations along the coast, said Kees Lokman, chair of landscape architecture at UBC.

Lokman is also principal investigator on a four-year research project, Living With Water, which is examining how cities and First Nations can adapt to climate change and flooding. The project is based out of the University of Victoria's Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

"If we don't really plan ahead, it will impact us pretty drastically, especially with these new findings," Lokman said. "Some of these rises to sea level might happen faster than we originally predicted or anticipated."

The City of Richmond is one municipality that has heavily invested in dikes and flood protections in its climate plan.

The city is built just one metre above sea level, and in 2019 was one of several B.C. municipalities to official declare a climate emergency.

"A considerable amount of upgrades and improvements to the City's flood protection infrastructure have been completed and are planned for the short-, medium-, and long-term to address infrastructure age, growth and climate change," Richmond said on its website.

The province's environment minister, in his most recent mandate letter, was tasked with creating "a coastal strategy to better protect coastal habitat" and protecting the coast's economy.

Lokman says mitigation of B.C.'s contributions to greenhouse gases should be a priority, but also how communities can adapt to rising sea levels from climate change.

He says effects from the moon wobble could also help communities and policy makers address climate change.

"These events kind of give us a peek into the future of what normal sea level rise might look like," he said.

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Firefighters scrambled Friday to control a raging inferno in southeastern Oregon that’s spreading miles a day in windy conditions, one of numerous wildfires across the U.S. West that are straining resources. Crews had to flee the fire lines late Thursday after a dangerous “fire cloud” started to collapse, threatening them with strong downdrafts and flying embers. An initial review Friday showed the Bootleg Fire destroyed 67 homes and 117 outbuildings overnight in one county

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia Premier Iain Rankin has called a provincial election for Aug. 17, saying the campaign will focus on building the economy after the province "crushed" the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. "This province is at a pivotal moment, and we need to continue to make the right decisions for workers, for seniors, for families and for all Nova Scotians," Rankin said Saturday after visiting Lt.-Gov. Arthur LeBlanc to dissolve the legislature. "This election will be about how we best

As Quebec records its lowest number of daily COVID-19 cases, Dr. Isabelle Boucoiran says she's seeing a concerning trend among her pregnant patients. The gynecologist-obstetrician from the CHU Sainte-Justine says patients who were once eager to get their first jab of the COVID-19 vaccine are either waiting until after the delivery to get vaccinated or choosing to skip the shot altogether. "We have to respect their choice, but it's really important that they understand why it is recommended for t

HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Vietnam put its entire southern region in a two-week lockdown starting midnight Sunday, as confirmed COVID-19 cases exceeded 3,000 for the third day in a row. The lockdown order includes the Mekong Delta and Ho Chi Minh City metropolis, the country’s financial and economic hub with over 35 million people — nearly a third of Vietnam's population. Officials say they have to act as the number of infections reached nearly 50,000 since the outbreak reemerged at the end of April

President Vladimir Putin in June offered U.S. counterpart Joe Biden the use of Russian military bases in Central Asia for information gathering from Afghanistan, the Kommersant newspaper reported on Saturday, as American troops leave the country. Taliban fighters have made major advances as U.S. forces pull out after 20 years of war, a security headache for Moscow which fears refugees may be pushed into its Central Asian backyard and its southern defensive flank destabilised.

Paris Saint-Germain wanted an experienced central defender with leadership skills to shore up its defence after losing eight games and the French title last season. So, the club went for Sergio Ramos, handing the former Real Madrid captain a two-year contract at the age of 35. Ramos arrives a year after a bitterly disappointed Thiago Silva left the club, at the age of 35, after talks over a new deal for him collapsed. He had wanted a similar deal, but PSG was reluctant to offer it given his adva

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — Republican House Reps. Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene held a protest Saturday after a third venue in California canceled their event. Instead, they held a protest outside City Hall in Riverside, where one of the events was canceled. An Anaheim spokesman had announced the latest cancellation hours before the rally was scheduled to begin. “Here’s what they need to understand,” Greene told the crowd, according to the Press-Enterprise. “We’re going to put America firs

Canada has gone from a vaccine laggard to a world leader in COVID-19 immunizations in just a few months' time — thanks to an ambitious vaccination campaign that has so far blunted the spread of the much more virulent delta variant. More than 79 per cent of those eligible for a shot have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. While that's a high number, it suggests there are still more than six million people over the age of 12 who have chosen to forgo a shot altogether, or wait for a

WARNING: This story contains distressing details. A weekend of searching for unmarked graves is now underway at the site of the former Delmas Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan. The Battlefords Agency Tribal Chiefs, a council that represents six First Nation communities in the area, announced on Thursday it had partnered with SNC Lavalin to conduct a ground-penetrating radar search of the school site, about 30 kilometres northwest of the Battlefords. According to the National Centre for T

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. humanitarian chief in Afghanistan appealed for $850 million Thursday to help the war-torn country cope with the impact of the Taliban offensive, protracted malnutrition for a third of the country, a severe drought, and the return of 627,000 Afghans this year, most of them deported from neighboring Iran. Ramiz Alakbarov told reporters at U.N. headquarters after a virtual briefing from the capital of Kabul that at least 18 million Afghans are in need of assistance an

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea on Sunday sent military aircraft to replace the entire 301-member crew of a navy destroyer on an anti-piracy mission off East Africa after nearly 70 of them tested positive for the coronavirus, officials said. Two multi-role aerial tankers are bringing the new crew and will then take home 301 sailors aboard the 4,400-ton-class destroyer Munmu the Great, Joint Chiefs of Staff and Health Ministry officials said. They said 68 sailors have so far tested positive

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Haiti's political future on Sunday grew murkier after the surprise return of first lady Martine Moïse, who was released from a hospital in Miami where she was treated for injuries following an attack in which the president was assassinated. Martine Moïse did not make any public statements after she descended a private jet wearing a black dress, a black bulletproof vest, a black face mask and her right arm in a black sling as she mourned for President Jovenel Moïse, w

Ten hot weather records were broken in Saskatchewan on Thursday, and heat warnings are in place for all of the province's south on Saturday, according to Environment Canada. Thursday's hot spot was the Lucky Lake area, 90 kilometres northeast of Swift Current, which hit 36.2 C. That broke the old record for July 15 of 34.4 C, set in 1973. Lucky Lake is having a very hot summer. On July 2, it hit 40 C — which was the hottest day ever recorded in that area, according to Environment Canada. Meanwhi

Osama bin Laden once boasted that, with just a few jihadists, he could draw the United States military to the ends of the Earth, and drag the superpower into suffering economic, political and human losses with no lasting achievements to show for it. Now, two decades later, the United States is pulling out of Afghanistan. Next month, the military will complete its exit from the so-called graveyard of empires, after the longest war in American history — with trillions of dollars spent, thousands o

The warning told residents in Venezuela's capital shooting would not soon stop. By then barrio residents had already been sheltering in place for more than half a day, whole families prone on the floor to avoid unrelenting gunfire. The pitched gun battles between police and a collection of gangs at least 300-strong based in a cluster of barrios in western Caracas are another sign President Nicolas Maduro is losing control over parts of Venezuela, which is suffering from a deep economic crisis and a protracted breakdown of the rule of law.

Billionaire American businessman Jeff Bezos and his three crewmates are engaging in a crash course of training on Sunday in preparation for his company Blue Origin's inaugural flight to the edge of space planned for Tuesday. The suborbital launch from a site in the high desert plains of West Texas marks a crucial test for Blue Origin's New Shepard spacecraft, a 60-foot-tall (18.3 meters) and fully autonomous rocket-and-capsule combo that is central to plans by Bezos to tap a potentially lucrative space tourism market. Joining them for Blue Origin's launch will be Bezos, the founder and current executive chairman https://www.reuters.com/business/media-telecom/whats-next-amazons-bezos-look-his-instagram-2021-07-03 of Amazon.com Inc, and his brother Mark Bezos.

The town of Edson is testing a new emergency shelter that officials hope will translate into a long-term solution to help people without a home in rural Alberta get a good night's sleep. Five small rooms, known as pods, have been carved out of the back of a recycling building in the town 200 kilometres west of Edmonton to accommodate those that need a place to stay overnight. The pods opened a little more than a month ago and since then, the pods have been used about 100 times. The small rooms a

Raul Castro was among thousands who attended a government-organized rally in Havana on Saturday to denounce the U.S. trade embargo and reaffirm their support for Cuba's revolution, a week after unprecedented protests rocked the communist-run country. Government supporters gathered on the city's seafront boulevard before dawn to wave Cuban flags and photos of late revolutionary leader Fidel Castro and his brother Raul. The latter retired as Communist Party leader in April but promised to continue fighting for the revolution as a "foot soldier".

Even before they met, a Saskatchewan couple had a shared dream of renovating a bus and travelling across North America. Then they met, and they've spent their time at home during the pandemic manifesting it. Shanny Kirby and Karlen Janvier have put more hours than they can count into outfitting their 2002 Bluebird passenger bus, called the Muss Bus. It originally had seating for 36 kids when they bought it in December of last year for $5,000, but by the end their "tiny home," currently parked in

Moon 'wobble,' climate change seen as driving coastal flooding in 2030s

KSL.com 17 July, 2021 - 12:00am

A key factor identified by the scientists is a regular "wobble" in the moon's orbit — first identified in the 18th century — that takes 18.6 years to complete. The moon's gravitational pull helps drive Earth's tides.

In half of this lunar cycle, Earth's regular daily tides are diminished, with high tides lower than usual and low tides higher than usual. In the cycle's other half, the situation is reversed, with high tides higher and low tides lower.

The expected flooding will result from the combination of the continuing sea level rise associated with climate change and the arrival of an amplification part of the lunar cycle in the mid-2030s, the researchers said.

"In the background, we have long-term sea level rise associated with global warming. It's causing sea level to increase everywhere," Ben Hamlington, NASA team leader and one of the study's authors, told Reuters.

"This effect from the moon causes the tides to vary, so what we found is that this effect lines up with the underlying sea level rise, and that will cause flooding specifically in that time period from 2030 to 2040," Hamlington said.

The researchers studied 89 tide gauge locations in every coastal U.S. state and territory aside from Alaska. The effect of the dynamic applies to the entire planet except for far northern coastlines like in Alaska.

The prediction pushes previous estimates for serious coastal flooding forward by about 70 years.

The study, published this month in the journal Nature Climate Change, was led by members of a NASA science team that tracks sea level change. The study focused on U.S. coasts but the findings are applicable to coasts worldwide, NASA said.

"This is eye-opening for a lot of people," Hamlington said. "It's really critical information for planners. And I think there's a great amount of interest in trying to get this information from science and scientists into the hands of planners."

Hamlington said city planners should plan accordingly.

"A building or particular piece of infrastructure, you may want to be there for a very long amount of time, whereas something else you may just want to protect or have access to for a few years."

(Reporting by Dan Fastenberg; Editing by Diane Craft and Will Dunham)

Moon 'wobble,' climate change seen as driving coastal flooding in 2030s By Reuters

Investing.com 16 July, 2021 - 12:00am

(Reuters) - U.S. coastlines will face increasing flooding in the mid-2030s thanks to a regular lunar cycle that will magnify rising sea levels caused by climate change, according to research led by NASA scientists.

A key factor identified by the scientists is a regular "wobble" in the moon's orbit - first identified in the 18th century - that takes 18.6 years to complete. The moon's gravitational pull helps drive Earth's tides.

In half of this lunar cycle, Earth's regular daily tides are diminished, with high tides lower than usual and low tides higher than usual. In the cycle's other half, the situation is reversed, with high tides higher and low tides lower.

The expected flooding will result from the combination of the continuing sea level rise associated with climate change and the arrival of an amplification part of the lunar cycle in the mid-2030s, the researchers said.

"In the background, we have long-term sea level rise associated with global warming. It's causing sea level to increase everywhere," Ben Hamlington, NASA team leader and one of the study's authors, told Reuters.

"This effect from the moon causes the tides to vary, so what we found is that this effect lines up with the underlying sea level rise, and that will cause flooding specifically in that time period from 2030 to 2040," Hamlington said.

The researchers studied 89 tide gauge locations in every coastal U.S. state and territory aside from Alaska. The effect of the dynamic applies to the entire planet except for far northern coastlines like in Alaska.

The prediction pushes previous estimates for serious coastal flooding forward by about 70 years.

The study, published this month in the journal Nature Climate Change, was led by members of a NASA science team that tracks sea level change. The study focused on U.S. coasts but the findings are applicable to coasts worldwide, NASA said.

"This is eye-opening for a lot of people," Hamlington said. "It's really critical information for planners. And I think there's a great amount of interest in trying to get this information from science and scientists into the hands of planners."

Hamlington said city planners should plan accordingly.

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - Talks between Argentina and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are advancing, the Argentine representative to the development bank said on Saturday, a...

(Reuters) - Minneapolis Federal Reserve President Neel Kashkari said many U.S. economic sectors faced rapidly rising prices and were struggling to adjust to reopening after the...

We encourage you to use comments to engage with other users, share your perspective and ask questions of authors and each other. However, in order to maintain the high level of discourse we’ve all come to value and expect, please keep the following criteria in mind:  

Are you sure you want to block %USER_NAME%?

By doing so, you and %USER_NAME% will not be able to see any of each other's Investing.com's posts.

%USER_NAME% was successfully added to your Block List

Since you’ve just unblocked this person, you must wait 48 hours before renewing the block.

I feel that this comment is:

Science Stories

Top Stores