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Economic Times 26 June, 2021 - 02:29am 20 views

Is there tuna in Subway sandwiches?

"The fact is Subway restaurants serve 100% wild-caught, cooked tuna, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests," the company said in a statement. CNETSubway tuna sandwich DNA results: The controversy explained

What's in a Subway tuna sandwich?

You'll love every bite of our classic tuna sandwich. 100% wild caught tuna blended with creamy mayo then topped with your choice of crisp, fresh veggies. subway.comTuna Sandwich - Tuna Melt - Sub Sandwiches Menu | SUBWAY®

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Subway is defending its tuna following a wave of accusations that it’s fake calling the claims  "baseless" and "threatening" to its business.

The sandwich chain on Wednesday said a recent New York Times report claiming lab tests found no tuna DNA in its sandwiches is false. 

"A recent New York Times report indicates that DNA testing is an unreliable methodology for identifying processed tuna," a spokesperson for Subway told FOX Business in a statement. "This report supports and reflects the position that Subway has taken in relation to a meritless lawsuit filed in California and with respect to DNA testing as a means to identify cooked proteins. DNA testing is simply not a reliable way to identify denatured proteins, like Subway’s tuna, which was cooked before it was tested." 

The Times had 60 inches of Subway tuna sandwiches from three different restaurants in Los Angeles frozen and sent to a lab in California which determined "no amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA. Therefore, we cannot identify the species," according to the Times. 

A spokesperson for the lab told the Times two potential reasons tuna was not detected in the sample: "One it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification … Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna." 

Subway, however, argued that the testing the Times report referenced "does not show that there is not tuna in Subway’s tuna. All it says is that the testing could not confirm tuna, which is what one would expect from a DNA test of denatured proteins." 

The chain continued to maintain its restaurants "serve 100% wild-caught, cooked tuna, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches wraps and salads." 

Subway continued to call the claims "baseless" and a threat to its franchisees and small business owners.

The food fraud claims brought on against the sandwich chain stem from a class-action suit filed in California in January alleging Subway’s tuna is made from "a mixture of various concoctions," first reported by the Washington Post. 

Subway noted in its statement that the plaintiffs in the California lawsuit "abandoned their original claim that Subway’s tuna product does not contain tuna" and filed an amended complaint alleging its tuna is not 100% tuna and that it's not sustainably caught skipjack and yellowfin tuna. 

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Read full article at Economic Times

Milford-based Subway Responds To New York Times Tuna Test

Patch.com 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

MILFORD, CT - Milford-based Subway, the world's largest sandwich chain, has released a statement in response to last weekend's New York Times article in which laboratory testing of the chain's tuna was unable to identify the product as tuna, though did not conclude that it was not tuna.

In an article, Times reporter Julie Carmel, sent Subway tuna to an unidentified lab, which conducted a PCR test - which rapidly makes millions or billions of copies of a specific DNA sample - to determine if it was tuna.

"No amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA," the lab concluded. 'Therefore, we cannot identify the species."

A lab spokesman continued: "There's two conclusions. One, it's so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn't make an identification. Or, we got some and there's just nothing there that's tuna."

The Times reporter explained that it was not necessarily surprising the DNA test of the cooked and processed fish was somewhat inconclusive.

"Once tuna has been cooked, it's DNA becomes denatured - meaning that the fish's characteristic properties have likely been destroyed, making it difficult, if not impossible, to identify," Carmel wrote.

After the article was published, Subway responded on its website.

"Unfortunately, various media outlets have confused the inability of DNA testing to confirm a specific protein with a determination that the protein is not present," the chain wrote.

"The testing that the New York Times report references does not show that there is not tuna in Subway tuna. All it says is that the testing could not confirm tuna, which one would expect from a DNA test of denatured proteins."

All of this stems from a class-action lawsuit filed in California last January by plaintiffs Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin alleging Subway makes false claims about its tuna.

The plaintiffs did not say what they believe is used instead of tuna.

At the time the suit was filed, Subway responded by saying there was no truth to the allegations.

"Subway delivers 100-percent cooked tuna to its restaurants, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests," the chain said in a statement.

SeafoodSource.com reported this week that the lawsuit was amended earlier this month and now also focuses on the veracity of Subway's marketing and advertising claims that its tuna is 100-percent sustainably-caught skipjack and yellowfin tuna.

Subway also responded to that claim in its recent statement.

"Just like the original claim, the new claims are untrue and have absolutely no merit," the restaurant wrote. "In fact, the amended complaint does not remedy any of the fundamental flaws in the plaintiffs' case that should result in the case being dismissed."

In February, the television show "Inside Edition" sent samples from three Subway locations in New York out for testing, and a lab found that the specimens were tuna.

In the Times story, multiple sources questioned what Subway's motivation would be to swap out its tuna for another product.

"I don't think a sandwich place would intentionally mislabel," Dave Rudie, the president of Catalina Offshore Products in San Diego, told the publication. "They're buying a can of tuna that says 'tuna.' If there's any fraud in this case, it happened at the cannery."

Subway obviously has not been happy with the negative press.

"The taste and quality of our tuna make it one of Subway's most popular products, and these baseless accusations threaten to damage our franchisees, small business owners who work tirelessly to uphold the high standards that Subway sets for all of its products, including its tuna," Subway wrote in its statement.

Subway says it’s off the hook for ‘meritless’ claims that tuna mix doesn’t actually contain tuna

KSAT San Antonio 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

While a lawsuit filed in January over the claims has been slightly reworded, New York Times is now claiming its independent testing also found no tuna DNA.

The original lawsuit was filed on behalf of two residents in California who say they were “tricked into buying food items that wholly lacked the ingredients they reasonably thought they were purchasing.” The lawsuit claimed that the sandwiches did not contain tuna but in June was reworded to say that it did not contain “100% sustainably caught skipjack and yellowfin tuna,” the New York Times reported. A claim that Subway also says is without merit.

A reporter with the paper wrote that she purchased “more than 60 inches of Subway tuna sandwiches” and froze the meat before shipping it to a commercial food testing lab.

According to the New York Times report, the food testing lab found “no amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample.” The lab researchers also stated that they “cannot identify the species.”

In response, Subway posted a lengthy statement on its website stating that Subway restaurants only serve 100% wild-caught tuna.

“A recent New York Times report indicates that DNA testing is an unreliable methodology for identifying processed tuna. This report supports and reflects the position that Subway has taken in relation to a meritless lawsuit filed in California and with respect to DNA testing as a means to identify cooked proteins,” the statement reads in part. “DNA testing is simply not a reliable way to identify denatured proteins, like Subway’s tuna, which was cooked before it was tested.”

The lab spokesperson seems to insinuate that this could indeed be the case. “There’s [sic] two conclusions. One, it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification. Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna,” the article stated.

The New York Times article also mentioned that Inside Edition sent samples from three different Subway locations for testing and the lab did find tuna in those samples.

Officials with Subway took further aim at the New York Times report stating that “all it says is that the testing could not confirm tuna, which is what one would expect from a DNA test of denatured proteins.”

“The taste and quality of our tuna make it one of Subway’s most popular products and these baseless accusations threaten to damage our franchisees, small business owners who work tirelessly to uphold the high standards that Subway sets for all of its products, including its tuna,” Subway continued.

Subway’s website previously listed their tuna mix as flaked tuna blended with creamy mayo but the description now states that the tuna sandwich is “100% wild-caught tuna blended with creamy mayo.”

A tuna industry official came to Subway’s defense in the New York Times saying, “They’re buying a can of tuna that says ‘tuna.’ If there’s any fraud in this case, it happened at the cannery.”

Subway officials ended their statement by saying “the lawsuit constitutes a reckless and improper attack on Subway’s brand and goodwill, and on the livelihood of its franchisees.”

This isn’t the first time Subway has been in hot water before in terms of their sandwiches. Last October, an Irish court said Subway bread wasn’t really bread because it contains too much sugar.

Copyright 2021 by KSAT - All rights reserved.

Mary Claire Patton has been a journalist with KSAT 12 since 2015. She has reported on several high-profile stories during her career at KSAT and specializes in trending news and things to do around Texas and San Antonio.

7 of Seattle's best deli sandwich spots that aren't Subway | Dished

Daily Hive 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

With the rising controversy over whether or not Subway uses real tuna or not, you may be wanting to switch sandwich makers.

Because deli sandwiches are the elite sandwiches, we fully understand why you’d rather have someone else make you a sandwich than put it together at home.

Here are seven deli sandwich spots that are great lunchtime hotspots:

Lunchtime is when Schmaltzy’s really shines. With offerings of pastrami, hot dogs, bacon, turkey, fish, and more, you can’t go wrong. They even offer up vegetarian options like the Classic Combo with honeycrisp apple, caramelized onion, sherry vinegar, thyme, spinach, and brie.

Most sandwiches are a great brunch or lunchtime food. HoneyHole will have you rethinking your whole way of life: their sandwiches are so good that you’ll be craving them for dinner.

There are so many components to the perfect banh mi: the bread must be toasty on the outside yet soft on the inside, the veggies have to have a tangy bite that doesn’t sting, there has to be a great house sauce — not too much, not too little — and it needs the perfect ratio of filling to other sandwich components. Lan Hue Banh Mi ticks all of these boxes.

Tat’s Deli is Seattle’s closest thing to a true East Coast deli. Enjoy everything from hoagies to Philly steaks, hot subs, and specials.

Names just can’t get any more creative than My Favorite Deli. That being said, it’s sure to become your favorite deli due to its simplicity and overall greatness.

Layers Sandwich Co. is a food truck that you don’t want to miss. With hilarious names such as Precocious Piggy, Splish Spash beef in a bath, and I’d Date a Jalapeño, you just know that the sandwich wizards don’t take themselves too seriously.

Yes, we know that Potbelly Sandwich Shop is a chain. That being said, their sandwiches taste wonderful and come incredibly fresh.

Subway Finally Responds To Latest Claims That Its Tuna Is Not Tuna

UNILAD 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

The sandwich giant has reportedly dismissed such claims as ‘baseless’ and ‘not reliable’, declaring that the tuna is in fact ‘100% wild-caught’.

These recent comments were made as one of the most unlikely lawsuits of the year continues, with a complaint lodged in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California back in January claiming that an independent test of the sub confirmed the ‘products are made from anything but tuna’.

Reporters for The Times obtained 60 inches worth of tuna subs from three separate LA Subways, which they then froze and sent over to a lab in California.

Scientists at the lab allegedly discovered that ‘no amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample and so we obtained no amplification products from the DNA’, revealing that they were unable to ‘identify the species’.

One it’s so heavily processed that whatever we could pull out, we couldn’t make an identification … Or we got some and there’s just nothing there that’s tuna.

Subway has now come forward to strongly refute the claims made in The Times, stating that these allegations posed a threat to the chain’s franchisees and small business owners.

A recent New York Times report indicates that DNA testing is an unreliable methodology for identifying processed tuna.

This report supports and reflects the position that Subway has taken in relation to a meritless lawsuit filed in California and with respect to DNA testing as a means to identify cooked proteins. DNA testing is simply not a reliable way to identify denatured proteins, like Subway’s tuna, which was cooked before it was tested.

The spokesperson went on to maintain that the franchise serves ‘100% wild-caught, cooked tuna, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches wraps and salads’.

Topics: Food, Now, subway

🐄 Why is beef so expensive?

The Hustle 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

In the latest update to the saga, The New York Times had 60 inches of Subway’s tuna sandwiches tested in a lab and found “no amplifiable tuna DNA” present in the sample.

This means either: 1) whatever Subway uses isn’t tuna, or 2) the tuna they use is so processed that the DNA is untraceable.

Makes you wonder about the meatball subs…

Demand for beef is up and suppliers are struggling to meet it. Since March, wholesale beef prices have increased 40%-70% depending on the cut, causing prices to also surge at restaurants and grocery stores, per The New York Times.

Grocers have responded by increasing beef prices by ~5%-9%. Some restaurants are slightly bumping up prices or 86-ing beef dishes entirely for fear of alienating customers.

But restaurants, grocery stores, and cattle ranchers aren’t seeing those profits. Rather, the meatpackers are.

Known as the Big 4, Cargill, JBS, Tyson Foods, and National Beef control 80%+ of the country’s processed meat market.

Typically, JBS or Cargill might make ~$50 per head, rarely up to $150, per analysts at RaboResearch. These days, they’re pulling in as much as $1k per head.

Cargill is on track to hit its most profitable year ever, profiting $4.3B in the first 9 months of its fiscal year, per Bloomberg.

… including the weather and labor shortages, some are accusing the Big 4 meatpackers of manipulating the supply — which they’ve denied.

The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry discussed consumer cattle prices on Wednesday.

“There is clearly a need for greater transparency and competition in the marketplace,” committee chairwoman Sen. Debbie Stabenow said, noting that the committee is not done with the issue.

In Norway, Tesla will allow other vehicles to use its supercharging stations. This is a big change for the EV maker, which has long held its supercharger network as a business moat. #clean-energy

“Google delays blocking third party cookies in Chrome until 2023”, per The Verge. #privacy

The Long Term Stock Exchange (LTSE) will add Twilio and Asana to its exchange, as it continues to woo companies that value sustainable corporate practices. #emerging-tech

Figma — the design software startup — raised $200m at a bonkers $10B valuation. #emerging-tech

Microsoft’s new Windows 11 operating system is here (yay?). The Verge has a good breakdown. #big-tech

Visa drops $2B+ to acquire European open-banking platform Tink. The move comes not long after US regulators blocked Visa’s acquisition of fintech firm Plaid. #fintech-cryptocurrency

Chainalysis — which provides blockchain analytics — is worth Nabs $4.2B+ raising $100m (it’s now received $365m in total funding). #fintech-cryptocurrency

Nike’s latest quarterly result showed a record revenue of $5.4B in its North America segment (and $12.3B over all). Its Nike Membership program now has 300m+ users. #ecommerce-retail

Founded by London-based artist Stacie McCormick, Fair Art Fair is a new app that directly connects unrepresented artists and buyers.

It essentially cuts out the middleman (the gallery) and allows collectors to match with and buy art they love. It launches on July 31, per NYT.

… and instead uses a subscription model priced at £15 (~$21) per month.

There’s also an “Art Curious” option that lets people browse art for free.

… thanks to a £35k (~$48k) emergency fund from Arts Council England. She used a second £150k (~$209k) infusion to build the app, and says she needs between 1k-1.5k subscribers to cover expenses.

Experts tell the NYT the app could be successful if well curated.

Now to find the perfect piece to hang behind you for your Zoom calls.

At the Jefferies Virtual Consumer Conference earlier this week, Wayfair co-founder Steven Conine predicted that “at some point in the future every home in the US will have a 3D model associated with it.”

… to show customers how furniture would look and fit.

Wayfair previously experimented with AR in its View In Room feature, which lets customers digitally place furniture at scale in their homes.

Other furniture companies have similar tools:

Here’s a party trick for you: Use AR to let the people on 19 Crimes’ wine labels tell you their misdeeds.

And guess what? The next Apple isn’t a phone company.

It’s a health care monitoring device that gives a real-time look into what’s happening in your body.

Buzzfeed plans to go public via a SPAC. Per CNBC, the media brand is targeting a $1.5B valuation. As part of the deal, Buzzfeed will acquire Complex Networks for $300m.

In its investor presentation, the company highlights Buzzfeed, Complex, HuffPost (acquired in 2020), Buzzfeed News, and Tasty as its anchor media assets.

Buzzfeed was founded 15 years ago, initially growing in popularity on Facebook and with clickbait-y “listicles.” Based on its history, we recreated the cover of its investor presentation with a more on-brand title:

The business secrets, tips, and tricks that have helped founders go from zero to millions — and even billions — of dollars.

Want to see ‘em? Just refer {3-referral_count} more friends to The Hustle and we’ll send you our curated set of interviews with founders from brands like Zola, AWAY, Vungle, Bonobos, and more.

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You’re only {5-referral_count} referrals away from your first Hustle swag, Sam’s Stickers. Slap a few of these bad boys on the ol’ laptop and let everyone in the coffee shop know that you know. You know?

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But hey, just because you’re a business nerd doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a cool bevvy. Get {10-referral_count} more referrals and we’ll send you a pint glass etched with The Hustle logo.

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You’re close to the most coveted item in Hustle-land: The Always Be Hustlin Tee.

The fabric? Luxurious. The cut? Relaxed, yet refined. The message? Indisputable.

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Hey, we see you. You’re out there spreading the gospel of The Hustle like it’s nobody’s business. Seems like you might be ready for a little more…

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And no, this ain’t an ad. We just think you’re the kinda person who would thrive in our top-tier community (it’s usually $299) full of founders, investors, and builders (AKA ambitious, no B.S. business folks like you — and enjoy our premium research and content.

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Heck, you practically work here anyway. Copy & paste this link to share:

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Fact check: Social media posts on Subway tuna DNA test lack context

USA TODAY 27 June, 2021 - 10:24am

Claims that a new study failed to find tuna in a Subway tuna sandwich fail to mention important factors surrounding the test.

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The lab sample came from Subway tuna sandwiches from three different store locations in Los Angeles. Video Elephant

Subway is facing criticism on social media, where users are highlighting a recent report about how much tuna is actually in the fast-food chain's tuna sandwiches.

The claim comes amid an ongoing lawsuit that alleges Subway's tuna sandwiches do not contain tuna. Online posts claim a new study came to the same conclusion. 

"New study fails to find any tuna DNA inside Subway tuna sandwich: 'We cannot identify the species,'" reads a June 22 Instagram post.

Accompanying the text is a screenshot of a June 22 Complex article headlined, "A Lab Analysis Was Done to Determine Whether a Subway Tuna Sandwich Contained Tuna DNA." 

USA TODAY reached out to the Instagram user for comment. 

While it's true that a recent New York Times analysis found no identifiable tuna DNA in a Subway sandwich, the post fails to mention additional context about the test. 

The claim stems from a lab test commissioned by The New York Times that reportedly detected no tuna DNA in tuna sandwiches collected from three different Subway locations in Los Angeles. 

The Times purchased the Subway sandwiches, removed the tuna, froze it and shipped it to an unidentified commercial food testing lab. The samples were run through a $500 PCR test, which detects genetic material from a specific organism, to look for any of five tuna types out of 15 species

According to the report, the lab said it found "no amplifiable tuna DNA was present in the sample." A lab analyst told the paper that this was because either the tuna was too heavily processed, or there was actually no tuna. 

There are other factors to take into consideration, such as how tuna DNA becomes denatured once it is cooked, making it difficult to identify a fish's characteristics.

The Times also notes that "a handful" of commercial labs declined to test the tuna samples, citing technical limitations and company policies. 

Subway has denied allegations that its sandwiches do not contain tuna, and a different lab test concluded the sandwiches do contain tuna. 

"DNA testing is simply not a reliable way to identify denatured proteins, like Subway’s tuna, which was cooked before it was tested," Lorri Christou, vice president of public relations, communications and public affairs at Subway, told USA TODAY.

"Unfortunately, various media outlets have confused the inability of DNA testing to confirm a specific protein with a determination that the protein is not present," she said in an emailed statement. 

Christou added that the Times report does not show there is not tuna in Subway's tuna, but that the testing could not confirm tuna, "which is what one would expect from a DNA test of denatured proteins." 

The Times article notes that cooking tuna likely destroys the fish's characteristic properties, "making it difficult, if not impossible, to identify." The Instagram post does not mention this.  

Additionally, the Jan. 21 lawsuit filed by plaintiffs Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin does not include specific evidence to support their claim that Subway sandwiches do not contain tuna, according to NBC News. The plaintiffs also did not test tuna in the sandwiches they actually ate. 

Subway issued a statement on Jan. 28 in response to the lawsuit, stating it delivers "100% cooked tuna to its restaurants."

In a June 7 court filing, the plaintiffs amended their original complaint and now accuse the restaurant chain of misleading customers by promoting its product as "100% sustainably caught skipjack and yellowfin tuna," according to TODAY.

"Just like the original claim, the new claims are untrue and have absolutely no merit," Christou told USA TODAY. "In fact, the amended complaint does not remedy any of the fundamental flaws in the plaintiffs’ case that should result in the case being dismissed."

Subway's website says it only sells skipjack and yellowfin tuna "sourced from fisheries with non-threatened stock levels."

In February, Inside Edition reported that it sent tuna samples from three New York Subway stores to a lab in Florida that specialized in conducting DNA testing of fish. The test found tuna in all samples received. 

The claim that a new study failed to find tuna DNA in a Subway tuna sandwich is MISSING CONTEXT, based on our research, because it lacks important details. The claim is based on a New York Times independent analysis, in which a reporter froze and shipped Subway tuna samples to a lab for analysis.. The lab tested for five tuna species (out of 15) and concluded that the tuna was too processed or that there was no tuna DNA. Different tests have detected tuna in Subway sandwiches, and experts say canned tuna becomes denatured when cooked. 

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