Why do the planets in the solar system orbit on the same plane?

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Livescience.com 19 September, 2021 - 06:00am 19 views

What smashed into Jupiter?

The most famous incident took place in 1994 when fragments of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet collided with Jupiter. ... The fragments smashed into Jupiter with the force of 300 million atomic bombs, according to NASA. The impacts started on July 16, 1994, and ended on July 22, 1994. InverseWhat crashed into Jupiter? Everything you need to know about that impact video

White flash on Jupiter spotted by amateur astronomers

News Nation USA 19 September, 2021 - 10:20pm

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Scientists and astronomers are working to confirm what a handful of stargazers on two continents saw Monday: a bright flash of light in the atmosphere of Jupiter that was likely a space rock impacting our solar system's largest planet.

At least five people in Brazil, Germany, France and Italy independently saw or recorded the white flash, according to amateur planetary observer Marc Delcroix.

A video of the event uploaded by Jose Luis Pereira of Brazil has been viewed 1.2 million times since Tuesday. According to Sky & Telescope, the impact happened at 6:39 p.m. ET Monday. Pereira decided to double-check what he saw with DeTeCt software -- created by Delcroix -- which observers often used to check for things like planetary impacts.

The European Space Agency tweeted out an image from Pereira on its operations account.

Italian Ernesto Guido tweeted out images he said were captured by amateur astronomers in Germany and France.

Impact Flash on Jupiter confirmed by at least 2 amateur astronomers: H. Paleske in Germany & by J.P. Arnould in France. See attached images & for more info about past Jupiter impact events: https://t.co/VIpSt2TQfn #astronomy #jupiter #impact pic.twitter.com/0kMP7iRMao

Paul Byrne, an associate professor of Earth and planetary science at Washington University, reportedly told Inverse that the object could potentially be hundreds of meters in size.

“We do know that it can't have been too big — images of Jupiter since the impact doesn't reveal an impact scar,” Byrne said.

An impact scar is what was famously left in July 1994 when the comet Shoemaker-Levy-9 hit the planet and left a dark feature on Jupiter that was bigger than the Earth.

If Monday's event is confirmed to be a strike, it would be just the eighth recorded event seen from Earth since Shoemaker-Levy-9.

Information and observations continue to be compiled and Delcroix is asking anyone who saw the flash independently to contact him.

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Jupiter explosion captured in video by an amateur astronomy

Ohionewstime.com 19 September, 2021 - 10:20pm

Amateur astronomers on two continents independently observed and recorded a white flash of light in the atmosphere on Jupiter’s Monday.

Scientists and astronomers are working to see what a few stargazers on the two continents saw on Monday: a bright flash of Jupiter’s atmosphere probably affects the largest planet in our solar system. It was a space lock to give.

According to the report, at least five people in Brazil, Germany, France and Italy saw and recorded the white flashes on their own. Amateur Planet Observer Mark Del Croix.

NS Event video Uploaded by Jose Luis Pereira of Brazil, it has been viewed 1.2 million times since Tuesday. According to Sky & Telescope, The impact occurred on Monday at 6:39 pm EST.Pereira decides to reaffirm what he saw DeTeCt software -Created by Delcroy-It was often used by observers to check for planetary effects and more.

The European Space Agency has tweeted an image from Pereira in its operational account.

Light Jupiter! Is there anyone at home? This bright shocking flash was discovered yesterday by astronomer Jose Luis Pereira on a giant planet.

There isn’t much information about the objects that affect it yet, but it can grow or be faster.

Thank you for the hit Jupiter ☄️#PlanetaryDefence pic.twitter.com/XLFzXjW4KQ

— ESA Operations (@esaoperations) September 14, 2021

Ernest Guido of Italy tweeted an image he said was taken by amateur astronomers in Germany and France.

Impact Flash on Jupiter Confirmed by At least Two Amateur Astronomers: H. Paleske of Germany and JP Arnould of France. See below for more information on the attached image and past Jupiter impact events. https://t.co/VIpSt2TQfn #astronomy #Jupiter # Impact pic.twitter.com/0kMP7iRMao

— Ernesto Guido (@ comets77) September 14, 2021

Paul Burn, Associate Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Washington, Reportedly told Inverse The size of the object can be hundreds of meters.

Brazilian astronomer Josel Ispereira detected a shock flash (a subtle white spot on this gif) on a giant planet on September 13.

Do follow-up observations reveal damage to the atmosphere?

(GIF processed by Marc Delcroix, h / t @peachastro). pic.twitter.com/6321pkkPp5

— Paul Byrne (@ThePlanetaryGuy) September 14, 2021

“We know it can’t be too big — an image of Jupiter because the impact doesn’t reveal the scars of the impact,” Burn said.

The impact mark was famously left in July 1994 when Comet Shoemaker-Levy-9 collided with a planet and left a dark feature on Jupiter, which is larger than Earth.

If Monday’s event is confirmed to be a strike, it will be the eighth recorded event from Earth since Shoemaker-Levy-9.

Information and observations continue to be edited, and Delcroy asks the person who saw the flash individually. Contact him..

Source link Jupiter explosion captured in video by an amateur astronomy

Something Large Just Hit Jupiter And Amateur Astronomers Caught It On Camera

IFLScience 19 September, 2021 - 10:20pm

There are many cameras on Earth (professional and amateur) pointing at our Solar System, watching its inhabitants for clues and events that might help us understand our planet's past – and possibly our future. Still, it's particularly joyous when one of those cameras catches something entirely unplanned because it happens to be pointing in the right direction, at the right time, to serendipitously see something rare and exciting.

This is what happened this week when multiple cameras on Earth caught something very large smash into Jupiter on September 13. Amateur photographers around the world caught the bright flash of what appeared to be an impact in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Incredibly, if confirmed, this will be only the eighth impact event observed on Jupiter since comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 collided with the gas giant in 1994 and made history, providing the first-ever direct observation of two bodies colliding in the Solar System.

As the largest planet in the Solar System, Jupiter's gravitational influence means it is also the most impacted, we just rarely see these collisions.

Thankfully, amateur astronomers have their telescopes and cameras pointing to the sky, catching most of the events recorded so far, including an asteroid or comet hitting the gas giant in 2016 and an asteroid collision in 2019.

In fact, it was the 2019 impact that allowed astronomers to calculate just how often Jupiter is hit by something large enough to create a flash visible from Earth. It's thought around 20-60 objects smash into the planet each year, so this new one being the eighth ever recorded shows how rarely we actually catch these events.  

Of course, half of these collisions happen on the far side of the gas giant and are fleeting, lasting mere seconds as the space rocks disappear into Jupiter's atmospheric layers, burning up in a fiery death and producing the telltale flash of light. If we miss the flash, other impact phenomena such as cloud disruption are often masked by the winds and swirling cloud layers around the massive planet.

However, it would appear our rate of detecting them is increasing. From the first seen comet collision in 1994, the next observed was in 2009, and since then they have been documented in 2010, 2012, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2020, and now 2021. 

Due to its massive gravitational pull, Jupiter may act as a shield for Earth, sucking up any stray space rocks that may be heading our way, although there's also a good chance it also helps sling the occasional asteroid or comet towards us too. This time, however, it appears it took one for the team, so thanks, Jupiter!

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Why do the planets in the solar system orbit on the same plane?

Eminetra.com 19 September, 2021 - 06:00am

To answer this question, we have to go back in time.

To answer this question, we have to travel to the very beginning of the solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago.

Back then, the solar system was just a massive, spinning cloud of dust and gas, Nader Haghighipour, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, told Live Science. That massive cloud measured 12,000 astronomical units (AU) across; 1 AU is the average distance between Earth and the sun, or about 93 million miles (150 million kilometers). That cloud became so big, that even though it was just filled with dust and gas molecules, the cloud itself started to collapse and shrink under its own mass, Haghighipour said.

As the spinning cloud of dust and gas started to collapse, it also flattened. Imagine a pizza maker throwing a spinning slab of dough into the air. As it spins, the dough expands but becomes increasingly thin and flat. That's what happened to the very early solar system.

As the sun grew, the cloud continued to collapse, forming "a disk around the star [that] becomes flatter and flatter and expands and expands with the sun at the center," Haghighipour said.

Eventually, the cloud became a flat structure called a protoplanetary disk, orbiting the young star. The disk stretched hundreds of AU across and was just one-tenth of that distance thick, Haghighipour said. 

For tens of millions of years thereafter, the dust particles in the protoplanetary disk gently swirled around, occasionally knocking into each other. Some even stuck together. And over those millions of years, those particles became millimeter-long grains, and those grains became centimeter-long pebbles, and the pebbles continued to collide and stick together. 

How long is a galactic year?

How massive is the Milky Way?

Do other planets have solar eclipses?

Eventually, most of the material in the protoplanetary disk stuck together to form huge objects. Some of those objects grew so big that gravity shaped them into spherical planets, dwarf planets and moons. Other objects became irregularly shaped, like asteroids, comets and some small moons. 

Despite these objects' different sizes, they stayed more or less on the same plane, where their building materials originated. That's why, even today, the solar system's eight planets and other celestial bodies orbit on roughly the same level.

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There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.

© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

Why do the planets in the solar system orbit on the same plane?

Yahoo News 19 September, 2021 - 06:00am

To answer this question, we have to go back in time.

To answer this question, we have to travel to the very beginning of the solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago.

Back then, the solar system was just a massive, spinning cloud of dust and gas, Nader Haghighipour, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, told Live Science. That massive cloud measured 12,000 astronomical units (AU) across; 1 AU is the average distance between Earth and the sun, or about 93 million miles (150 million kilometers). That cloud became so big, that even though it was just filled with dust and gas molecules, the cloud itself started to collapse and shrink under its own mass, Haghighipour said.

As the spinning cloud of dust and gas started to collapse, it also flattened. Imagine a pizza maker throwing a spinning slab of dough into the air. As it spins, the dough expands but becomes increasingly thin and flat. That's what happened to the very early solar system.

As the sun grew, the cloud continued to collapse, forming "a disk around the star [that] becomes flatter and flatter and expands and expands with the sun at the center," Haghighipour said.

Eventually, the cloud became a flat structure called a protoplanetary disk, orbiting the young star. The disk stretched hundreds of AU across and was just one-tenth of that distance thick, Haghighipour said. 

For tens of millions of years thereafter, the dust particles in the protoplanetary disk gently swirled around, occasionally knocking into each other. Some even stuck together. And over those millions of years, those particles became millimeter-long grains, and those grains became centimeter-long pebbles, and the pebbles continued to collide and stick together. 

How long is a galactic year?

How massive is the Milky Way?

Do other planets have solar eclipses?

Eventually, most of the material in the protoplanetary disk stuck together to form huge objects. Some of those objects grew so big that gravity shaped them into spherical planets, dwarf planets and moons. Other objects became irregularly shaped, like asteroids, comets and some small moons. 

Despite these objects' different sizes, they stayed more or less on the same plane, where their building materials originated. That's why, even today, the solar system's eight planets and other celestial bodies orbit on roughly the same level.

Thank you for signing up to Live Science. You will receive a verification email shortly.

There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.

© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

Why do the planets in the solar system orbit on the same plane?

ScienceAlert 19 September, 2021 - 06:00am

To answer this question, we have to go back in time.

To answer this question, we have to travel to the very beginning of the solar system, about 4.5 billion years ago.

Back then, the solar system was just a massive, spinning cloud of dust and gas, Nader Haghighipour, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, told Live Science. That massive cloud measured 12,000 astronomical units (AU) across; 1 AU is the average distance between Earth and the sun, or about 93 million miles (150 million kilometers). That cloud became so big, that even though it was just filled with dust and gas molecules, the cloud itself started to collapse and shrink under its own mass, Haghighipour said.

As the spinning cloud of dust and gas started to collapse, it also flattened. Imagine a pizza maker throwing a spinning slab of dough into the air. As it spins, the dough expands but becomes increasingly thin and flat. That's what happened to the very early solar system.

As the sun grew, the cloud continued to collapse, forming "a disk around the star [that] becomes flatter and flatter and expands and expands with the sun at the center," Haghighipour said.

Eventually, the cloud became a flat structure called a protoplanetary disk, orbiting the young star. The disk stretched hundreds of AU across and was just one-tenth of that distance thick, Haghighipour said. 

For tens of millions of years thereafter, the dust particles in the protoplanetary disk gently swirled around, occasionally knocking into each other. Some even stuck together. And over those millions of years, those particles became millimeter-long grains, and those grains became centimeter-long pebbles, and the pebbles continued to collide and stick together. 

How long is a galactic year?

How massive is the Milky Way?

Do other planets have solar eclipses?

Eventually, most of the material in the protoplanetary disk stuck together to form huge objects. Some of those objects grew so big that gravity shaped them into spherical planets, dwarf planets and moons. Other objects became irregularly shaped, like asteroids, comets and some small moons. 

Despite these objects' different sizes, they stayed more or less on the same plane, where their building materials originated. That's why, even today, the solar system's eight planets and other celestial bodies orbit on roughly the same level.

Thank you for signing up to Live Science. You will receive a verification email shortly.

There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.

© Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

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