Why Rashford has decided to have surgery eight months after tearing shoulder muscle

Sports

The Athletic 14 July, 2021 - 11:22pm 12 views

Where is Marcus Rashford mural?

The mural, based on a photograph by Daniel Cheetham, is painted on the side of the Coffee House Cafe on Copson Street. Peter Doherty, 46, who has owned the cafe for 12 years, said of the abusive graffiti: "It's not right. BBC NewsMarcus Rashford: Hundreds of messages left on mural

What did they write on Marcus Rashford mural?

The mural, based on a photograph by Daniel Cheetham, was created last November in recognition of Rashford's work to tackle child food poverty. His mother provided the quote on the mural, which reads: “Take pride in knowing that your struggle will play the biggest role in your purpose.” The Independent‘Lost for words’: Marcus Rashford thanks well-wishers after emotional scenes at mural

Why Rashford has decided to have surgery eight months after tearing shoulder muscle

Read full article at The Athletic

Racial abuse of England players exposes deep societal fractures and the need for change

World Economic Forum 15 July, 2021 - 08:28am

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In an Instagram post, Sir Lewis Hamilton, an influential Black sporting figure and Formula 1's seven-time world champion, voiced his condemnation of the attack and the underlying issues faced by minorities in sport: "The pressure to deliver is felt by every sportsperson but when you are a minority representing your country this is a layered experience. Success would feel like a double victory, but a miss feels like a two-fold failure when it's compounded with racist abuse… We must work towards a society that doesn't require Black players to prove their value or place in society only through victory."

Twitter reportedly removed more than 1,000 tweets and permanently suspended accounts that targeted abuse at the England players, as did Facebook/Instagram. A real estate service provider suspended an employee as they looked into racist tweets, and a right wing political commentator and comedian also faced scrutiny following their comments.

But despite this outpouring of support, there is still much to be done to address the larger societal issues of racism in sports and create safe digital spaces.

This is not the first time fans have turned to social media platforms or displayed abhorrent behaviour tied to sporting outcomes. For example, studies have shown that domestic violence surges after a football match ends: one study found that reports of domestic violence in the north-west of England during three football World Cups went up by 26% when the national team won or drew, and by 38% when the team lost.

Sports has also been at the centre of stories about racial profiling and discrimination at all levels. For example, during and before the Euro 2020, the England team kneeled before kick-off in solidarity against racism and inequality while some fans booed this gesture.

In addition, Rashford, who has helped British schools tackle child hunger, has constantly highlighted the racist abuse that continues to be targeted towards him.

A new World Economic Forum report on digital safety outlines how to address such instances of online harassment.

New legislation: While Facebook, Twitter and other platforms can set their own policies about what speech is allowed based on their own terms and values, they must abide by the local laws in which they operate. Different countries have taken varying approaches to the legality of hate speech, and many have called for new legislation to be able to be able to hold perpetrators to account for their comments.

Human rights experts point out that speech should not impede on the human rights of others; targeted harassment is designed to silence or cause victims to self‑censor. Therefore, unabridged speech without regard to harm can actually suppress speech, particularly for vulnerable groups.

Even worse, this speech and the ideology that leads to this expression can fuel attacks on immigrants and other minorities as was seen in the Christchurch terrorist attack. Combatting hate speech and online racial abuse based on characteristics such as race, gender and other identity characteristics is a fundamental step in stopping this violence.

Detection and enforcement: The Metropolitan police are now investigating the perpetrators of the online racial abuse, but this is unlikely to be an easy task. Given that many internet products do not require identity verification, pinpointing the culprits could be complicated. Even when the identities of suspected criminals are discovered, the challenge of prosecution and extradition across regional and national borders can prove defeating.

Closer collaboration between social media companies and law enforcement, as well as a fundamental assessment of the tensions between online privacy and safety, need to be resolved in order to better detect and enforce actions on those responsible for perpetrating harmful content.

Private sector responsibility and safety measures: Social media companies have worked to tackle abuse on their platforms. For example, Instagram rolled out a new tool to automatically filter out abusive DMs, which is targeted at celebrities and public figures. However, current moderation mechanisms, measures for safety and complain protocols do not go far enough in protecting users.

When it comes to harmful content, there is currently no industry‑wide accepted measure of user safety on digital platforms. Measures such as “prevalence”, defined by one product as user views of harmful content as a proportion of all views, does not reflect the important nuance that certain groups – based on their gender, race, ethnicity and other factors – may be more exposed to harmful content. In addition, more emphasis needs to be placed on “Safety By Design” so that tackling abuse and harm is a forethought rather than an afterthought.

New accountability framework: Players and sports personnel have often urged social media platforms to assume more responsibility in combatting these issues, which can have devastating impacts on players’ mental health, and wellbeing in society. Some governments are moving to a “duty of care” framework in order to address the responsibility of digital platforms in the content and activity that is carried out on their sites.

The regulatory framework that is needed to improve responsibility without severely hampering user-generated content, market innovation, and competition, requires further international collaboration.

Sports can be a force for cohesion but the fundamental issues causing fractures in society need to be better addressed. The Power of Media Taskforce on DE&I, comprised of leading sports leagues and media organizations, is committed to fostering industry commitment on the creation and distribution of more inclusive content, and seeks to leverage the reach of media platforms to broadcast important messages that promote equality and bring us together.

While efforts are underway to address online safety in different regions, there is more to be done at a global level to help address all forms of abuse and harmful content online. Effective regulatory frameworks to moderate data and content across social media platforms are required, as well as better education and awareness of the benefits of a more diverse and inclusive environment for society. The recently launched Global Coalition for Digital Safety aims to drive forward work to address these issues.

Sports organizations have a unique opportunity to influence, educate, and express positive views given their emotional connection to fans – doing so in a way that bridges rather than exacerbates divides will be key to ensuring a safer more inclusive future for all.

Farah Lalani, Community Curator, Media, Entertainment and Information Industries, World Economic Forum

Hesham Zafar, Community Curator, Media, Entertainment, and Information Industries, World Economic Forum

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

A weekly update of what’s on the Global Agenda

Manchester United hoping for Marcus Rashford's return for crucial October Premier League run - sources

ESPN 15 July, 2021 - 08:28am

Manchester United are hoping Marcus Rashford will recover from shoulder surgery in time to feature in a crucial run of fixtures for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's side at the end of October, sources have told ESPN.

Rashford is set to undergo surgery on his left shoulder after being hampered by it since November.

The 23-year-old could be ruled out for as long as 12 weeks, but there is hope he could recover in time to play in a tricky stretch of games starting against Leicester in mid-October.

After travelling to the King Power Stadium on Oct. 16, United face Liverpool at Old Trafford on Oct. 23, then Tottenham away on Oct. 30 before a home game with Manchester City on Nov. 6. United are also due to face Chelsea at Stamford Bridge on Nov. 27 and Arsenal at Old Trafford on Nov. 30.

Scans undertaken after Rashford's season ended with England's penalty shootout defeat to Italy in the Euro 2020 final have revealed that his shoulder injury is unlikely to heal sufficiently with rest alone, and an operation could take place before the end of the month.

As well as struggling with his shoulder, Rashford has also been coping with a foot injury picked up in March.

Despite playing through pain, he still managed to score 21 goals in 57 games.

Sources have told ESPN it has been more than two years since Rashford played a game completely pain-free.

The 21-year-old underwent a medical on Tuesday, and his £72.9 million move from Borussia Dortmund has been completed.

Sancho has been granted a three-week holiday after his time with England at the European Championship and is not expected to begin training at Carrington until August.

He could feature in United's final preseason fixture against Everton at Old Trafford on Aug. 7 before the new Premier League season kicks off on Aug. 14.

Jadon Sancho speaks out about racist abuse sent to him, Rashford and Saka after Euro 2020

Daily Mail 15 July, 2021 - 08:28am

By Jordan Seward For Mailonline

Jadon Sancho has insisted 'we need to do better as a society' and 'hold people accountable' as he spoke out for the first time after he and his 'brothers' Marcus Rashford and Bukayo Saka were racially abused after the Euro 2020 final.

The 21-year-old was a victim of vile racial abuse after he was one of three players to miss from the penalty spot as England suffered an agonising 3-2 shootout defeat against Italy at Wembley on Sunday night.

Sancho, who is on the verge of returning to England in a £73million deal to join Manchester United, admitted missing his penalty was the 'worst feeling in my career' as he issued a long, heartfelt response to the Three Lions' Euro 2020 heartbreak.

Jadon Sancho has spoken out about the racist abuse he received after his penalty miss

The England star condemned the racists who abused him and his team-mates as he penned a long, heartfelt message on Instagram in response to the Three Lions' Euro 2020 heartbreak

Writing on Instagram, Sancho also hit out at the people who racially abused him and his international team-mates Rashford and Saka.

The statement read: 'I’ve had a couple of days to reflect on Sunday's final and still feel a mix of emotions. I would like to say sorry to all my team-mates, coaching staff and most of all the fans who I let down. 

'This is by far the worst feeling I’ve felt in my career. It’s hard to even put into words the real feeling, but there were so many positives to take away from this tournament though the defeat will hurt for a long time. My first thought before going into any football match is always “How can I help my team?, how am I going to assist? how am I going to score? how am I going to create chances?"

'And that’s exactly what I wanted to do with that penalty, help the team. I was ready and confident to take it, these are the moments you dream of as a kid, it is why I play football. These are the pressured situations you want to be under as a footballer. I’ve scored penalties before at club level, I’ve practised them countless times for both club and country so I picked my corner but it just wasn’t meant to be this time.'

19-year-old Bukayo Saka was in tears after missing the decisive penalty in the shootout

Racists bombarded Saka, Marcus Rashford and Sancho with abhorrent abuse after the trio missed their penalties during the Euro 2020 final against Italy last Sunday

Sancho slammed the racists who abused him and his 'brothers' Rashford (pictured) and Saka

It continued: 'I’m not going pretend that I didn’t see the racial abuse that me and my brothers Marcus and Bukayo received after the game, but sadly it's nothing new. As a society we need to do better, and hold these people accountable.

'Hate will never win. To all the young people who have received similar abuse, hold your heads up high and keep chasing the dream. I am proud of this England team and how we have united the whole nation in what has been a difficult 18 months for so many people. Much as we wanted to win the tournament, we will build and learn from this experience going forward.'

Sancho, Saka and Rashford were bombarded with abhorrent abuse on social media after failing to score their spot kicks, while the latter also had his mural in Withington defaced with racist graffiti before fans covered it up with messages of support and street artist Akse repaired the damage. 

Anti-racism campaigners also gathered at Rashford's mural on Tuesday night to take the knee in front of it. The Manchester United star, 23, took to Instagram to share his thanks after fans rushed to cover the offensive message, writing: 'Overwhelmed. Thankful. Lost for words.'

I’ve had a couple of days to reflect on Sunday's final and still feel a mix of emotions. I would like to say sorry to all my teammates, coaching staff and most of all the fans who I let down. 

This is by far the worst feeling I’ve felt in my career. It’s hard to even put into words the real feeling, but there were so many positives to take away from this tournament though the defeat will hurt for a long time. My first thought before going into any football match is always “How can I help my team?, how am I going to assist? how am I going to score? how am I going to create chances? 

And that’s exactly what I wanted to do with that penalty, help the team. I was ready and confident to take it, these are the moments you dream of as a kid, it is why I play football. These are the pressured situations you want to be under as a footballer. I’ve scored penalties before at club level, I’ve practiced them countless times for both club and country so I picked my corner but it just wasn’t meant to be this time.

We all had the same ambitions and objectives. We wanted to bring the trophy home.

This has been one of the most enjoyable camps I’ve been part of in my career so far, the togetherness of the team has been unmatched, a real family on and off the pitch.

I’m not going pretend that I didn’t see the racial abuse that me and my brothers Marcus and Bukayo received after the game, but sadly it's nothing new. As a society we need to do better, and hold these people accountable.

Hate will never win. To all the young people who have received similar abuse, hold your heads up high and keep chasing the dream. I am proud of this England team and how we have united the whole nation in what has been a difficult 18 months for so many people. Much as we wanted to win the tournament, we will build and learn from this experience going forward. I want to say a massive thank you for all the positive messages and love and support that far outweighed the negative. It’s been an honour as always representing England and wearing the Three Lions shirt, and I have no doubt we’ll be back even stronger! Stay safe & see you soon

People place messages of support to cover up abuse that was left on a mural of Rashford

Since the shocking abuse of England's black players, a petition to ban racists from football for life has passed one millions signatures.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has also warned social media companies today they will face fines amounting to 10 per cent of their global revenue if they fail to remove hate and racist abuse from their platforms as huge numbers of people continue to urge the government and football authorities to crack down on the problem. 

Sportsmail revealed today that England players were targeted with 12,500 abusive messages during Euro 2020 that had been sent from 10,000 different accounts.

Top-flight clubs, meanwhile, have agreed that fans found to have behaved in an abusive or discriminatory way will be banned from every Premier League ground under new rules for the coming season.   

More than one million people have signed a petition to ban racists from all matches for life

Glamour model Katie Price has backed the petition, which has gained huge traction this week

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England's Marcus Rashford defiant after racist abuse

Times of Oman 15 July, 2021 - 08:28am

Hundreds take the knee in front of Marcus Rashford mural

The Telegraph 15 July, 2021 - 08:28am

Euro 2020: Five people arrested over racist abuse of England players

BBC News 15 July, 2021 - 07:48am

Marcus Rashford, Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sancho were targeted after they missed penalties in the Euro 2020 final.

Chief Constable Mark Roberts said the abuse was "utterly vile".

"If we identify that you are behind this crime, we will track you down and you will face the serious consequences of your shameful actions," he said.

Police said "a torrent of racist comments aimed at some of the team's black players" appeared on social media platforms on Sunday, after England lost on penalties to Italy in the final at Wembley.

The UK Football Policing Unit said its team was working through "a significant number of reports of racist abuse".

The latest arrest was made by Cheshire Police, who have arrested a 42-year-old man from Runcorn on suspicion of displaying threatening, abusive or insulting written material that is likely to stir up racial hatred.

The force said he was arrested as part of an investigation into a racist social media message, which was posted after the Euro 2020 final.

The man has been released under investigation pending further inquiries.

Chief Constable Mark Roberts, National Police Chiefs' Council football policing lead, said the racial abuse "has quite rightly shocked and appalled people across the country".

"Our England team have been true role models during the tournament, conducting themselves with professionalism and dignity. I'm disgusted there are individuals out there who think it's acceptable to direct such abhorrent abuse at them, or at anybody else."

He said the investigation would continue to try to find those responsible and officers were working closely with social media platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

England manager Gareth Southgate has said the racist abuse aimed at Rashford, Sancho and Saka was "unforgivable".

And Prime Minister Boris Johnson has promised to ban people guilty of sending racist abuse to footballers from attending matches.

He said he would ensure the "football banning order regime is changed" to crack down on racism.

The UK Football Policing Unit said, as of 13 July, 897 football-related incidents and 264 arrests had been recorded across the country in the 24-hour period surrounding the final.

Dozens more are missing after some of the worst flooding in years struck the west of the country.

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