Yankees star Derek Jeter inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

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Associated Press 08 September, 2021 - 04:59pm 4 views

Is Derek Jeter in the Hall of Fame?

Former Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter will finally be inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday. His ceremony last year was nixed because of COVID-19. Jeter received 396 of 397 votes in his first year on the ballot. Sports IllustratedThe Only Derek Jeter Take You Need As He Enters the Hall of Fame Is Larry David’s Take: TRAINA THOUGHTS

Who was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame today?

Jeter, Larry Walker, Ted Simmons, and Marvin Miller were enshrined Wednesday afternoon. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum officially welcomed its four newest members Wednesday. This year's induction ceremony honored the 2020 Hall of Fame class, led by Derek Jeter and Larry Walker. CBS sports.comDerek Jeter joins greats as Baseball Hall of Fame's 2020 class finally gets inducted in Cooperstown

When is Derek Jeter's induction ceremony?

Derek Jeter is finally headed to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York as part of the 2020 class of inductees on Wednesday, Sept. 8 (9/8/2021). The National Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony will be broadcast on MLB Network, which can be streamed live on fuboTV, Sling and other live TV services. syracuse.comHow to watch Derek Jeter’s induction in the Baseball Hall of Fame: Time, TV channel, live stream

How many votes did Derek Jeter get for Hall of Fame?

Jeter recorded 396 votes out of the 397 ballots, which kept him from joining former teammate Mariano Rivera as the only first-ballot unanimous pick in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Sports IllustratedDerek Jeter Teases One Writer Who Denied Him a Unanimous Selection in Hall of Fame Speech

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Derek Jeter was simply Derek Jeter on his special day — smooth as silk.

On a Wednesday afternoon that turned cloudy with the temperature in the 70s and a few sprinkles in the air and adoring fans chanting his name, the former New York Yankees star shortstop and captain was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame after a long wait necessitated by the pandemic.

Greeted by raucous cheers in a crowd estimated at 20,000 that included NBA luminaries Michael Jordan and Patrick Ewing, several of his former teammates, and Hall of Fame Yankees manager Joe Torre on the stage behind him, Jeter took his turn after fellow inductees from the class of 2020 Ted Simmons, Larry Walker and the late Marvin Miller were honored. Jeter was touched by the moment and acknowledged how different the ceremony seemed in the wake of the recent deaths of 10 Hall of Famers.

“I’m so honored to be inducted with you guys and linked to you forever,” he said. “The Hall of Fame is special because of those who are in it. We’ve lost way too many Hall of Famers over the last 20 months. These are all Hall of Famers who would have or could have been here, so for that reason it’s not the same.”

What was the same was the adoration displayed by the fans, who always marveled at his consistency.

“I had one goal in my career, and that was to win more than everyone else, and we did that, which brings me to the Yankee fans,” Jeter said as the fans erupted again. “Without question, you helped me get here today as much as any individual I’ve mentioned.”

He gave much of the credit to his parents, who were in the audience with Jeter’s wife, Hannah, and their two young daughters.

“Mom, you taught me any dream is attainable as long as you work harder than everyone else. You drilled that in my head over and over and over and you led me to believe it,” Jeter said. “You told me never to make excuses, you wouldn’t allow me to use the word can’t. Dad, you’ve been the voice of reason. You taught me to be patient, to listen and think before I speak. You’ve always been there for advice and to this day you’re the first person I go to. I know when I retired you said you played every game with me and I know you recall from time to time telling me, ‘You keep building that resume.’ Look where it’s gotten us today.”

The ceremony was delayed a year because of the coronavirus pandemic and it didn’t matter much to Walker, the second Canadian elected to the Hall of Fame. He gave up hockey when he was 16 to focus on baseball. He was selected in his 10th and final year on the writers’ ballot after a stellar career with Montreal, Colorado and St. Louis that included 383 homers and three batting titles.

“It’s taken a little longer to reach this day (but) for all your support I’ve received throughout the years from my home country, I share this honor with every Canadian,” said Walker, who retired in 2005. “I hope that all you Canadian kids out there that have dreams of playing in the big leagues, that see me here today gives you another reason to go after those dreams. To my adopted home, the United States, I thank you for allowing this Canadian kid to come into your country to live and play your great pastime. I think we’re all pretty fortunate to have two amazing countries side by side.”

The 72-year-old Simmons, who starred in a 21-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals, Milwaukee and Atlanta, punctuated his speech to thank four pioneers of free agency — Curt Flood, Catfish Hunter, Andy Messersmith and Marvin Miller — “who changed the lives of every player on this stage today by pushing the boundaries of player rights.”

“Marvin Miller made so much possible for every major league player from my era to the present and the future,” the former catcher said. “I could not be more proud to enter this great hall with this great man. Even though my path has been on the longer side, I wouldn’t change a thing. However we get here, none of us arrives alone. I’m no exception.”

Miller, who transformed baseball on the labor front by building a strong players union and led the charge for free agency in the mid-1970s, was honored posthumously. Four years before he died at 95 in 2012, Miller respectfully asked to be removed from consideration for the Hall of Fame after being passed over several times.

“One thing a trade union leader learns to do is how to count votes in advance. Whenever I took one look at what I was faced with, it was obvious to me it was not gonna happen,” Miller, head of the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966-83, wrote in 2008. “If considered and elected, I will not appear for the induction if I’m alive. If they proceed to try to do this posthumously, my family is prepared to deal with that.”

The family didn’t. Instead, Don Fehr, who was hired by Miller to be the union’s general counsel in 1977 and succeeded him eight years later, had the honor.

“Of all the players I had the privilege to represent, I want to thank you Marvin,” said Fehr, now the head of the National Hockey League Players Association. “Baseball was not the same after your tenure as it was before. It was and is much better for everyone. You brought out the best of us and you did us proud.”

The virus forced the Hall of Fame to cancel last year’s ceremony and this year’s was moved from its customary slot on a Sunday in late July to a midweek date.

More AP MLB: https://apnews.comJ/hub/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Read full article at Associated Press

Derek Jeter calls out the one writer who didn't vote for him during Hall of Fame speech

Yahoo Sports 09 September, 2021 - 09:20pm

Dan Wetzel, Pat Forde, Pete Thamel

Andy Behrens, Dalton Del Don, Matt Harmon, Liz Loza, Scott Pianowski

You Pod to Win the Game

Jeter's status as a Hall of Famer was never in doubt. The instant he retired, it was known Jeter would cruise into the Hall on the first ballot. The only question was whether Jeter would be the second player to receive 100 percent of the vote.

Jeter did make it in on the first ballot, but he wasn't a unanimous selection. Jeter received 99.7 percent of the vote. Of all the writers who voted, only one left Jeter off their ballot.

That still bothers Jeter, who made sure to call out the one voter who believed Jeter wasn't worthy of the Baseball Hall of Fame. 

Jeter didn’t forget 😬 pic.twitter.com/txLt2ILCGA

— B/R Walk-Off (@BRWalkoff) September 8, 2021

The identity of that voter is not known. Baseball writers who are in the Baseball Writers' Association of America for 10 years earn the right to vote on the Baseball Hall of Fame. For many years, votes and ballots were kept private, but the writers now have the option to make their ballots public.

Many do. When Jeter was elected to the Hall, over 315 writers went public with their ballots. There were 397 ballots submitted, meaning only a small portion of the voters opted to keep their ballots private. One of the anonymous voters kept Jeter off their ballot. 

With the snub, Yankees closer Mariano Rivera remains the only player inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame to receive 100 percent of the vote. 

Jeter may have headlined the event, but Simmons and Walker received their fair share of praise and admiration from fans. On Simmons' end, people couldn't stop talking about his voice:

seems like ted simmons has a good voice pic.twitter.com/Ls23XRi5Yj

— Chork (@cdgoldstein) September 8, 2021

For Walker, it was his love of SpongeBob SquarePants.

Larry Walker making his love of Spongebob one of the most prominent parts of Hall-of-Fame induction is the crossover event and recurring bit that I never knew I needed pic.twitter.com/Ft26QbDoNq

— Joon 이준엽 (@joonlee) September 8, 2021

Marvin Miller died in 2012, and was inducted into the Hall on Wednesday by former MLBPA executive director Donald Fehr. Prior to his death, Miller asked to be taken off the Hall of Fame ballot. Though Miller's children didn't object to Miller getting inducted, they did not attend the Hall of Fame ceremony out of respect for their father's wishes. That's why he was inducted by Fehr.

In addition to Fehr's speech, Miller was honored by a number of MLB stars.

— MLBPA (@MLBPA) September 8, 2021

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The epitome of Derek Jeter's excellence was in the numbers all along.

Derek Jeter Finally Inducted Into HoF

CBS New York 09 September, 2021 - 09:20pm

Hall of Famer Derek Jeter Talks About His Speech - MLB Network

MLB Network 09 September, 2021 - 09:20pm

Jeter enshrined in HOF: 'Been a hell of a ride'

ESPN 08 September, 2021 - 05:19pm

No teams in your favorites yet.

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- On an induction day that seemed for months would never come, New York Yankees great Derek Jeter went into the Hall of Fame on Wednesday with three others in front of a crowd dominated by Yankee colors, logos and his signature uniform No. 2.

"It's been a hell of a ride," Jeter said, closing out a long-overdue afternoon of speeches and remembrance.

Larry Walker, Ted Simmons and late labor pioneer Marvin Miller were honored alongside Jeter, and the career of each provided poignant moments during baseball's first induction ceremony since July 21, 2019. The 2020 ceremony was canceled because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the 2021 ceremony, after initially being slated to be a television-only event, was postponed so that fans would be in attendance.

Most of those fans turned out for Jeter, the celebrated captain of the Yankees who led baseball's most storied franchise to seven pennants and five World Series titles during a 20-year career in which he had 3,465 hits, the sixth-highest total in big league history.

After waiting out his standing ovation and the familiar "DER-EK JE-TER" chants from New York fans spread out along the lawn behind the Clark Sports Complex, Jeter began by thanking his family, saying that his father "was my first idol" and recounting how as a child he would show his early love for the Yankees by playing whiffle ball in the backyard in full pinstripes while imitating former Yankee Dave Winfield.

Winfield, now a Hall of Famer, was sitting on stage behind Jeter.

"When everyone asks about nerves, they assume it's because of a speech, what I may say or not say, how many people are in attendance," Jeter said. "No, no, no. The nerves are because of these people that are behind me now, and all those who are part of the Hall of Fame family. Because the great thing about baseball is its history. That's what makes it so special."

Jeter, who has long said that the only thing he ever wanted to do in baseball was to play shortstop for the New York Yankees, said that doing so was "one of the greatest honors of my life."

He added his goal as a Yankee was to "win more than everybody else -- and we did."

Jeter also poked some fun at the lone unknown sportswriter who did not vote for him in the BBWAA balloting that made him a near-unanimous selection in January 2020.

"Thanks to the writers," Jeter said. "All but one of them."

The ceremony began with a bittersweet video presentation marking the lives of the 10 Hall of Famers who died during the 26 months since the last induction day. The video was narrated by Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench, who was unable to attend after testing positive for COVID-19.

Thirty-one Hall of Famers made the trip to Cooperstown to watch the Hall's membership grow to 333. No one was elected during the BBWAA round of voting in 2021, and the era committees were unable to meet because of the pandemic. So the Class of 2020 had the 2021 induction all to themselves.

Walker gave the most lighthearted speech, recalling the time early in his minor league career when he ran across the diamond without retouching second base on a fly ball because he didn't know the rules.

That's because Walker was born in Canada and grew up playing hockey. He became the second Canadian-born Hall of Famer, joining pitcher Fergie Jenkins, who was in attendance and was recognized by Walker during his speech.

"I honestly see myself as an average guy," Walker said. "And I'm good with average. I've lived my life to never get too high, and never to get too low. But to stand on this stage right now and to tell you I'm feeling average would be a complete lie. My feet have not touched the ground all day."

Walker hit .313 with 383 career homers over a 17-year career and won the 1997 NL MVP award while playing for the Colorado Rockies. He becomes the first Rockies player to go into the Hall with the team's cap emblazoned on his plaque.

Simmons was selected by an era committee during the 2019 winter meetings. The eight-time All-Star catcher retired after the 1988 season before going on to a long post-playing career as a scout and executive.

"My path was long," Simmons said. "But I wouldn't change a thing."

Simmons said that if he could have chosen one person to go into Cooperstown with, it would have been Miller, the legendary head of the Major League Baseball Players Association. Miller died in 2012.

Speaking on behalf of Miller was his successor as the head of the MLBPA, Donald Fehr, who explained the importance of Miller's place in the game. Alas, Fehr might have been a little too detailed in his explanation, as the crowd began to grow restless as his speech went on.

Much of that was because of whom most of the crowd was there to see. At one point, Jeter recalled how during his career, his father frequently reminded him to, "Keep building that resume."

After Wednesday, and the long wait for it come, the resume is now complete for Jeter and the rest of baseball's newest immortals.

Yankees star Derek Jeter inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Fox News 08 September, 2021 - 04:55pm

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Derek Jeter was simply Derek Jeter on his special day — smooth as silk.

On a Wednesday afternoon that turned cloudy with the temperature in the 70s and a few sprinkles in the air and adoring fans chanting his name, the former New York Yankees star shortstop and captain was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame after a long wait necessitated by the pandemic.

Greeted by raucous cheers in a crowd estimated at 20,000 that included NBA luminaries Michael Jordan and Patrick Ewing, several of his former teammates, and Hall of Fame Yankees manager Joe Torre on the stage behind him, Jeter took his turn after fellow inductees from the class of 2020 Ted Simmons, Larry Walker and the late Marvin Miller were honored. Jeter was touched by the moment and acknowledged how different the ceremony seemed in the wake of the recent deaths of 10 Hall of Famers.

“I’m so honored to be inducted with you guys and linked to you forever,” he said. “The Hall of Fame is special because of those who are in it. We’ve lost way too many Hall of Famers over the last 20 months. These are all Hall of Famers who would have or could have been here, so for that reason it’s not the same.”

What was the same was the adoration displayed by the fans, who always marveled at his consistency.

“I had one goal in my career, and that was to win more than everyone else, and we did that, which brings me to the Yankee fans,” Jeter said as the fans erupted again. “Without question, you helped me get here today as much as any individual I’ve mentioned.”

He gave much of the credit to his parents, who were in the audience with Jeter’s wife, Hannah, and their two young daughters.

“Mom, you taught me any dream is attainable as long as you work harder than everyone else. You drilled that in my head over and over and over and you led me to believe it,” Jeter said. “You told me never to make excuses, you wouldn’t allow me to use the word can’t. Dad, you’ve been the voice of reason. You taught me to be patient, to listen and think before I speak. You’ve always been there for advice and to this day you’re the first person I go to. I know when I retired you said you played every game with me and I know you recall from time to time telling me, ‘You keep building that resume.’ Look where it’s gotten us today.”

The ceremony was delayed a year because of the coronavirus pandemic and it didn’t matter much to Walker, the second Canadian elected to the Hall of Fame. He gave up hockey when he was 16 to focus on baseball. He was selected in his 10th and final year on the writers’ ballot after a stellar career with Montreal, Colorado and St. Louis that included 383 homers and three batting titles.

“It’s taken a little longer to reach this day (but) for all your support I’ve received throughout the years from my home country, I share this honor with every Canadian,” said Walker, who retired in 2005. “I hope that all you Canadian kids out there that have dreams of playing in the big leagues, that see me here today gives you another reason to go after those dreams. To my adopted home, the United States, I thank you for allowing this Canadian kid to come into your country to live and play your great pastime. I think we’re all pretty fortunate to have two amazing countries side by side.”

The 72-year-old Simmons, who starred in a 21-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals, Milwaukee and Atlanta, punctuated his speech to thank four pioneers of free agency — Curt Flood, Catfish Hunter, Andy Messersmith and Marvin Miller — “who changed the lives of every player on this stage today by pushing the boundaries of player rights.”

“Marvin Miller made so much possible for every major league player from my era to the present and the future,” the former catcher said. “I could not be more proud to enter this great hall with this great man. Even though my path has been on the longer side, I wouldn’t change a thing. However we get here, none of us arrives alone. I’m no exception.”

Miller, who transformed baseball on the labor front by building a strong players union and led the charge for free agency in the mid-1970s, was honored posthumously. Four years before he died at 95 in 2012, Miller respectfully asked to be removed from consideration for the Hall of Fame after being passed over several times.

“One thing a trade union leader learns to do is how to count votes in advance. Whenever I took one look at what I was faced with, it was obvious to me it was not gonna happen,” Miller, head of the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966-83, wrote in 2008. “If considered and elected, I will not appear for the induction if I’m alive. If they proceed to try to do this posthumously, my family is prepared to deal with that.”

The family didn’t. Instead, Don Fehr, who was hired by Miller to be the union’s general counsel in 1977 and succeeded him eight years later, had the honor.

“Of all the players I had the privilege to represent, I want to thank you Marvin,” said Fehr, now the head of the National Hockey League Players Association. “Baseball was not the same after your tenure as it was before. It was and is much better for everyone. You brought out the best of us and you did us proud.”

The virus forced the Hall of Fame to cancel last year’s ceremony and this year’s was moved from its customary slot on a Sunday in late July to a midweek date.

More AP MLB: https://apnews.comJ/hub/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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